Matthew 10:27 What I tell you in darkness, you speak in light:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

What I teach you in the dark, speak into the light. As you hear into your ear, you announce on the housetops.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:27 What I tell you in darkness, that speak ye in light: and what ye hear in the ear, that preach ye upon the housetops.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The two prepositions translated as "in" here are different words with different meanings. The difference relates to the secondary meanings of "the dark" and "the light" as "ignorance" and "knowledge." The double meaning is that they heard "within" their ignorance, but that they are speak "in regards to" their knowledge. "Light" also has the third meaning of "into public" but that is more obvious.

The phrase, "hear in the ear" is a way of expressing "hear whispered in your ear".

NIV : 

Matthew 10:27 What I tell you in the dark, speak in the daylight; what is whispered in your ear, proclaim from the roofs.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:27 What I tell you now in the darkness, shout abroad when daybreak comes. What I whisper in your ear, shout from the housetops for all to hear!

Wordplay: 

 The double meanings of light and darkness connect this verse to the previous ones. 
 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

(pron sg neut acc) "What" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is from humin, z form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τῇ (article sg fem dat) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

σκοτίᾳ, [5 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Darkness" is skotia, which means "darkness", "dark", "gloomy," [of persons] "in the dark", "in secret," and "secret." It is a metaphor for "obscure," and "the nether world," and was used as the opposite the Greek word gnome, γνώμη, meaning judgment, opinion, purpose and therefore also a metaphor for "ignorance."

εἴπατε (2nd pl aor imperat act) "Speak ye" is from eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τῷ (article sg neut dat) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

φωτί: (noun sg neut dat) "Light" is from phos, which means "light", "daylight [primarily], "illumination [of things and of the mind]", "light [of the eyes], "window", "opening", "public visibility," and "publicity." Jesus uses it as a metaphor for "knowledge," but in Greek it is also a metaphor for "deliverance", "happiness", "victory," and "glory."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

(pron sg neut acc ) "What" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

εἰς (prep) "In" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὸ (article sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."  

οὖς (noun sg neut acc) "Ear" is from ous, which means "ear" and things that resemble an ear, such as a handle on pitchers, cups, etc.

ἀκούετε, (2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye hear" is from akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

κηρύξατε (2nd pl aor ind act or 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Preach ye" is from kerysso, which means "to be a herald", "to summon by a herald", "proclaim", "call upon", "announce", "declare," and "command publicly." Only in the NT is it translated as "preach" or "teach publicly."

ἐπὶ (prep) "Unto" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

τῶν (article pl neut gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δωμάτων. [7 verses] (noun pl neut gen) "Housetops" is doma, which means a "a house", "a hall", "housetop", "chief room", "household," or "a family."

KJV Analysis: 

What The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

tell The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you  -- The "you" here is plural, indirect object, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "surrounded by," and "among."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

darkness, -- "Darkness" is translated from a Greek word that means both "darkness" and "in secret," but it is not the word for "secret" in the previous verse. This is a metaphor for "ignorance." Since Christ is clearly using it in opposition to "the light", so only "the dark" works here, but the other contrasts between "in secret/in public" "ignorance/knowledge" are implied. The previous verse used a different word that also means "secret" and "hidden".

that -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is the source of the "that" that appears here.

speak -- "Speak" is another common Greek word that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

in -- (CW)  The word translated as "in" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

light: -- "Light" is a Greek word that means both "light" and "in public." It is a metaphor for "knowledge."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." Here "and" words, but "as" adds another level of meaning.

what -- The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

hear -- The word translated as "ye hear" means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

in -- The word translated as "in" in this part of the verse is a different word than the previous "in." This one means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

ear, -- "Ear" is the word that means "ear" and things resembling ears.

that -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is the source of "that."

preach -- "Preach" is translated from a Greek word that means to "act as a herald" and "to make a proclamation." This is the same word Christ used at the beginning of this section sending the Apostles out.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

upon -- The word translated as "upon" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

housetops. -- "Housetops" is translated from a Greek word that is the source of our word "domicile." It has most of the same meanings as the word Jesus usually uses for "house," but it also means the chief room of a house and the housetop.

KJV Translation Issues: 

5
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "in" referring to the light is a different word than the "in" referring to the darkness.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.

NIV Analysis: 

What The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

tell The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you  -- The "you" here is plural, indirect object, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "surrounded by," and "among."

the --  This word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

dark, -- "Dark" is translated from a Greek word that means both "darkness" and "in secret," but it is not the word for "secret" in the previous verse. This is a metaphor for "ignorance." Since Christ is clearly using it in opposition to "the light", so only "the dark" works here, but the other contrasts between "in secret/in public" "ignorance/knowledge" are implied. The previous verse used a different word that also means "secret" and "hidden".

speak -- "Speak" is another common Greek word that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

in -- (CW)  The word translated as "in" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the  --This word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

daylight: --"Daylight" is a Greek word that means both "light" and "in public." It is a metaphor for "knowledge."

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." Here "and" words, but "as" adds another level of meaning.

what -- (WF) The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause. It is not in the form of the subject of the verb but its object.

is whispered  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "I whisper" in the Greek source.

untranslated "hear"-- (MW) The untranslated word "hear" means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." It is the second-person plural form, present tense,  so "you hear." The meaning of "whispered" does come from the following phrase "in the ear," but the form should be "what you hear whispered."

in -- The word translated as "in" in this part of the verse is a different word than the previous "in." This one means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

your -- (WW) The word translated as "you" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

ear, -- "Ear" is the word that means "ear" and things resembling ears.

proclaim -- "Proclaim" is translated from a Greek word that means to "act as a herald" and "to make a proclamation." This is the same word Christ used at the beginning of

from -- (WW) The word translated as "from" means"upon."  "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on." This is not a preposition that means "from."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

rooftops . -- "Rooftops" is translated from a Greek word that is the source of our word "domicile." It has most of the same meanings as the word Jesus usually uses for "house," but it also means the chief room of a house and the housetop.

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "in" referring to the light is a different word than the "in" referring to the darkness.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "what" is not the subject but the object of the verb.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is whispered" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "hear" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "your" means "the."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "from" means "upon."

NLT Analysis: 

What The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

tell The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you  -- The "you" here is plural, indirect object, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "surrounded by," and "among."

the --  This word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

darkness, -- "Darkness" is translated from a Greek word that means both "darkness" and "in secret," but it is not the word for "secret" in the previous verse. This is a metaphor for "ignorance." Since Christ is clearly using it in opposition to "the light", so only "the dark" works here, but the other contrasts between "in secret/in public" "ignorance/knowledge" are implied. The previous verse used a different word that also means "secret" and "hidden".

shout -- (WW)  "Shout" is another common Greek word that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

abroad --  (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "abroad" in the Greek source.

when -- (WW)  The word translated as "when" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

daybreak : -- (WW) "Daybreak" is a Greek word that means both "light" and "in public." It is a metaphor for "knowledge." It is not the word for "daybreak."

comes --  (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "comes" in the Greek source.

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." Here "and" words, but "as" adds another level of meaning.

what -- The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

I whisper  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "I whisper" in the Greek source.

untranslated "hear"-- (MW) The untranslated word "hear" means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." It is the second-person plural form, present tense,  so "you hear." The meaning of "whispered" does come from the following phrase "in the ear," but the form should be "what you hear whispered."

in -- The word translated as "in" in this part of the verse is a different word than the previous "in." This one means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

your -- (WW) The word translated as "you" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

ear, -- "Ear" is the word that means "ear" and things resembling ears.

shout -- "Shout" is translated from a Greek word that means to "act as a herald" and "to make a proclamation." This is the same word Christ used at the beginning of

from -- (WW) The word translated as "from" means"upon."  "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on." This is not a preposition that means "from."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

rooftops . -- "Rooftops" is translated from a Greek word that is the source of our word "domicile." It has most of the same meanings as the word Jesus usually uses for "house," but it also means the chief room of a house and the housetop.

for all to hear!  -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "for all to hear" in the Greek source.

NLT Translation Issues: 

12
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "shout" should be "speak."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "abroad" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "when" should be "into."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "daybreak" should be "light."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "comes" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "I whisper" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "hear" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "your" means "the."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "from" means "upon."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "for all to hear" doesn't exist in the source.

The Spoken Version: 

“But everyone keeps secrets,” observed Judge. “You explain things to us at night that you don’t explain to others in your public teaching. This meeting is an example. Isn’t this meeting secret?”
The teacher smiled, but shook his head, no, indicating the person recording the meetings notes.
‘What I teach you in the dark,” the teacher responded. “Speak in the daytime.”
“What about things you whisper privately in our ears?” Asked John.
“As you hear into that ear,” the teacher answered, playfully boxing the young man’s ear. Then turning to them all, he said, “You all announce on the housetops.”

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Mar 19 2020