Matthew 10:37 He who loves his father

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

Sending of Apostles, preferenses

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The one preferring a father or a mother instead of me isn't worth as much as me. The one preferring a son or a daughter instead of me isn't worth as much as me.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:37 He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In the Greek, this verse states the obvious: that the apostles must prefer Jesus if they are going to leave their families to go out on the road to preach as Jesus did. The key to this verse is the specific meaning of the Greek word translated as "love." The word used here is NOT the word usually used for the love of parents and children (see this article of the meaning of the two Greek words translated as "love").  The verb used here means the "liking" we have toward friends. The Greek word can mean "prefer." The Greek terms for "love" and "hate" do not describe raw emotions, but they are comparisons of types of preferences, so "prefer" works well here.

As in all discussions of the term translated as "worthy" or "deserving," the focus in Greek is one of balance.  Jesus is saying that those who love him less the parents and children are not his "counterbalance" or, more generally, not his equal. When putting the "my" before the adjective as it is here, the adjective should be treated like a noun form.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:37  Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.

3rd Translation: 

Matthew 10:37 If you love your father or mother more than you love me, you are not worthy of being mine; or if you love your son or daughter more than me, you are not worthy of being mine.

Wordplay: 

 One of Christ's parallel phrases where the world play is in the differences between the two. Here, the contrast is between the past (parents) and the future (children). 

My Takeaway: 

The decisions in life are based on our priorities.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

(article sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

φιλῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "Loveth" is from phileo, which means "to love", "to regard with affection", "to kiss," and "to approve of."

πατέρα (noun sg masc acc) "The Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." -

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

μητέρα (noun sg fem acc) "Mother" is from mêtêr (meter), which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin."

ὑπὲρ (prep) "Over" is from hyper (huper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure."

ἐμὲ (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔστιν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

μου (pron 1st sg masc gen) "Of me" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

ἄξιος: (adj sg masc nom) "Worthy" is from axios, which means "counterbalancing", "weighing as much", "of like value", "worth as much as", "worthy", "goodly", "deserved", "due", "worthy", "estimable", "worthy of", "deserving", "fit", "due," and "as deserved."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

(article sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

φιλῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "Loveth" is from phileo, which means "to love", "to regard with affection", "to kiss," and "to approve of."

υἱὸν (noun sg masc acc) "Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

θυγατέρα (noun sg fem acc) "Daughter" is the Greek, thygater, which is generally a female descendant, "maidservant", "female slave," and "villages dependent on a city."

ὑπὲρ (prep) "Over" is from hyper (huper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure."

ἐμὲ (pron 1st sg masc acc ) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔστιν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

μου (pron 1st sg masc gen) "Of me" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

ἄξιος: (adj sg masc nom) "Worthy" is from axios, which means "counterbalancing", "weighing as much", "of like value", "worth as much as", "worthy", "goodly", "deserved", "due", "worthy", "estimable", "worthy of", "deserving", "fit", "due," and "as deserved."

KJV Analysis: 

He that -- (WW) The word translated as "he that"  is the Greek definite article, "the"which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun as here, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

loveth -- (WF) "Loveth" is the Greek verb that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. It implies preferring to spend time with someone, enjoying their company. More on the two Greek words Christ uses that get translated as "love" in this article. The form of the verb is not an active verb, as translated, but a participle, acting as an adjective.

father -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor. It is not "the father" but "a father".

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something. Again, it is "a mother" not "the mother".

more than -- "More than" is a preposition that means "over" "beyond",  and "instead of."

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object ofthe verb or preposition.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

worthy -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing,"  "weighing as much, " "of like value," and "worth as much as." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. 

me:  -- "Of me" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun precedes the noun so "my."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

He that -- (WW) The word translated as "he that"  is the Greek definite article, "the"which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun as here, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

loveth -- (WF) "Loveth" is the Greek verb that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. It implies preferring to spend time with someone, enjoying their company. More on the two Greek words Christ uses that get translated as "love" in this article. The form of the verb is not an active verb, as translated, but a participle, acting as an adjective.

son -- The word translated as "son" primarily means "son" but the word is used to indicate a child or any descendant.

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

daughter -- The word translated as "daughter" means any female descendant and was used to address female servants and slaves.

more than -- "More than" is a preposition that means "over" "beyond",  and "instead of."

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the clause's object.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

worthy -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing,"  "weighing as much, " "of like value," and "worth as much as." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. 

me:  -- "Of me" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun precedes the noun so "my."

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "He that" should be "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "loveth" is not an active verb but a participle, "loving" or "liking."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "He that" should be "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "loveth" is not an active verb but a participle, "loving" or "liking."

NIV Analysis: 

Anyone who loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.

Anyone who -- (WW) The word translated as "anyone who"  is the Greek definite article, "the"which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun as here, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

loves -- (WF) "Loves" is the Greek verb that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. It implies preferring to spend time with someone, enjoying their company. More on the two Greek words Christ uses that get translated as "love" in this article. The form of the verb is not an active verb, as translated, but a participle, acting as an adjective.

their -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "their" in the Greek source.

father -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor. It is not "the father" but "a father".

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something. Again, it is "a mother" not "the mother".

more than -- "More than" is a preposition that means "over" "beyond",  and "instead of."

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the clause's object.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

worthy -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing,"  "weighing as much, " "of like value," and "worth as much as." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. 

me:  -- "Of me" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun precedes the noun so "my."

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

anyone who -- (WW) The word translated as "anyone who"  is the Greek definite article, "the"which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun as here, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

loves -- (WF) "Loves" is the Greek verb that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. It implies preferring to spend time with someone, enjoying their company. More on the two Greek words Christ uses that get translated as "love" in this article. The form of the verb is not an active verb, as translated, but a participle, acting as an adjective.

their -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "their" in the Greek source.

son -- The word translated as "son" primarily means "son" but the word is used to indicate a child or any descendant.

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

daughter -- The word translated as "daughter" means any female descendant and was used to address female servants and slaves.

more than -- "More than" is a preposition that means "over" "beyond",  and "instead of."

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the clause's object.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

worthy -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing,"  "weighing as much, " "of like value," and "worth as much as." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. 

me:  -- "Of me" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun precedes the noun so "my."

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  •  
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "Anyone who" should be "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "loves" is not an active verb but a participle, "loving" or "liking."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "their" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "Anyone who" should be "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "loves" is not an active verb but a participle, "loving" or "liking."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "their" doesn't exist in the source.

3rd Analysis: 

If -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "their" in the Greek source.

you -- (WW) The word translated as "you"  is the Greek definite article, "the"which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun as here, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

love -- (WF) "Love" is the Greek verb that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. It implies preferring to spend time with someone, enjoying their company. More on the two Greek words Christ uses that get translated as "love" in this article. The form of the verb is not an active verb, as translated, but a participle, acting as an adjective.

your -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "your" in the Greek source.

father -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor. It is not "the father" but "a father".

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something. Again, it is "a mother" not "the mother".

more than -- "More than" is a preposition that means "over" "beyond",  and "instead of."

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the clause's object.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

worthy -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing,"  "weighing as much, " "of like value," and "worth as much as." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. 

being -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "being" in the Greek source.

mine:  -- (WF) "Mine" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun precedes the noun so "my." "Mine" would require the adjective form, not the possessive.

or -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "or" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

If -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "their" in the Greek source.

you -- (WW) The word translated as "you"  is the Greek definite article, "the"which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun as here, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

love -- (WF) "Love" is the Greek verb that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. It implies preferring to spend time with someone, enjoying their company. More on the two Greek words Christ uses that get translated as "love" in this article. The form of the verb is not an active verb, as translated, but a participle, acting as an adjective.

your -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "your" in the Greek source.

son -- The word translated as "son" primarily means "son" but the word is used to indicate a child or any descendant.

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

daughter -- The word translated as "daughter" means any female descendant and was used to address female servants and slaves.

more than -- "More than" is a preposition that means "over" "beyond",  and "instead of."

me -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the clause's object.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

worthy -- The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing,"  "weighing as much, " "of like value," and "worth as much as." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. 

being -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "being" in the Greek source.

mine:  -- (WF) "Mine" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun precedes the noun so "my." "Mine" would require the adjective form, not the possessive.

3rd Issue Count: 

11
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "if" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "you" should be "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "love" is not an active verb but a participle, "loving" or "liking."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "your" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "being" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "mne" requires an adjective form not a possessive.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" should be "and."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "if" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "you" should be "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "love" is not an active verb but a participle, "loving" or "liking."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "your" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "being" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "mne" requires an adjective form not a possessive.

The Spoken Version: 

“You yourself, however,” Scribbler objected, “have always taught people honoring our father’s and mothers.”
“But several of us have parents who don’t approve of our leaving home and following the Master,” noted Ben Simon.
“If our parents disagree with the spirit of the Divine,” responded Wine Bag, “they don’t deserve you.”
“Nor does anyone who sides with the family against the Divine,” added Ben Simon.
“Is that true, Master? asked Johnny Boy
“The one liking of a father or a mother above me?” responded the Master. “No, he isn’t really deserving of me.  
“What about children?” asked the Rock. “My children adore you, but they don’t want me leaving them for weeks being a herald.”  
“Also the one liking a son or a daughter above me,” added the Master, “doesn’t deserve me.”

evidence: 

142.00

Front Page Date: 

Sep 21 2020