Matthew 10:40 He that receives you receives me

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The one welcoming you for himself is welcoming me. And the one welcoming me for himself is welcoming the One sending me.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:40 He that receiveth you receiveth me, and he that receiveth me receiveth him that sent me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word translated as "receive" means "welcome" when applied to people. It is not the word commonly translated as "receive." This concept of "welcoming" is the topic of the next two verses, but the common word for "receive" is combined with it. The word here for "sent" is the same word that Jesus uses in "sending" out the apostles. It is actually the source of our word, "apostle."

This is an example of a verse that seems to appear both in Matthew and in John, but does it?  In translation, it looks very like John 13:20, but the Greek is different. In John's version, a different word is used as "receive," one that does not mean "welcome" in this sense. It is a more common word that means "to get" or "to take". In John, a shorter and more common is also used as "sent".

NIV : 

Matthew 10:40  Anyone who welcomes you welcomes me, and anyone who welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:40 Anyone who receives you receives me, and anyone who receives me receives the Father who sent me.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

(article sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δεχόμενος (part sg pres mp masc nom) "Receiveth " is from dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is from humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐμὲ (pron 1st sg acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

δέχεται, (3rd sg pres ind mp) "Receiveth " is from dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

(article sg masc nom) "He" is from which is the singular, masculine article (nominative) or neuter demonstrative pronoun (nom. or acc.), "the", "he," and "that" referring to a noun.

ἐμὲ (pron 1st sg acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

δεχόμενος (part sg pres mp masc nom) He that receiveth " is from dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

δέχεται (3rd sg pres ind mp) "Receiveth " is from dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "He that" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀποστείλαντά (part sg aor act masc acc) "Him that sent" is from apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch." -

με. (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

KJV Analysis: 

He that -- The word translated as "he that" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

receiveth -- (CW, WF) "Receiveth"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

you  -- The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners. Since this is hidden in English, we use "you all" to distinguish plural "you's".

receiveth -- (CW) "Receiveth"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is also in a form that indicates someone acting by or for himself.

me,  -- The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

he that -- The word translated as "he that" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

receiveth -- (CW, WF) "Receiveth"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

me -- The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

receiveth -- (CW) "Receiveth"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is  also in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

him that  -- The word translated as "him that" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."  Here, it is in the form of an object. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

sent -- (WF) The "Sent" here is a verb that means "to send off" and "dispatch." This word is the source of our word "apostle." It is in the form of an adjective, "sending", again, used as a noun, "the one sending."

me. - The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the normal verb translated as receive, but one that means "welcome."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "receive" is not an active verb but a participle, "welcoming."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the normal verb translated as receive, but one that means "welcome."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the normal verb translated as receive, but one that means "welcome."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "receive" is not an active verb but a participle, "welcoming."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."

NIV Analysis: 

Anyone who -- The word translated as "anyone who " is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

welcomes -- (WF) "Welcomes "  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

you  -- The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners. Since this is hidden in English, we use "you all" to distinguish plural "you's".

welcomes -- "Welcomes"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is also in a form that indicates someone acting by or for himself.

me,  -- The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

anyone who  -- The word translated as "anyone who " is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

welcomes -- (WF) "Welcomes "  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

me -- The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

welcomes -- "Welcomes "  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is  also in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

the one who  -- The word translated as "the one who" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."  Here, it is in the form of an object. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

sent -- (WF) The "Sent" here is a verb that means "to send off" and "dispatch." This word is the source of our word "apostle." It is in the form of an adjective, "sending", again, used as a noun, "the one sending."

me. - The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

NIV Translation Issues: 

3
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "welcome" is not an active verb but a participle, "welcoming."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "welcome" is not an active verb but a participle, "welcoming."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."

NLT Analysis: 

Anyone who -- The word translated as "anyone who " is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

receives -- (CW, WF) "Receives"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

me -- The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

receives -- (CW) "Receives"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is  also in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

me,  -- The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

anyone who  -- The word translated as "anyone who " is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

receives -- (CW, WF) "Receives"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

me -- The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

receives -- (CW) "Receives"  is translated from a Greek word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. This is not an active verb, but a participle, "receiving." It is  also in a form which indicates someone acting by or for himself.

the   -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."  Here, it is in the form of an object. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father who -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "Father who " in the Greek source.

sent -- (WF) The "Sent" here is a verb that means "to send off" and "dispatch." This word is the source of our word "apostle." It is in the form of an adjective, "sending", again, used as a noun, "the one sending."

me. - The "me" is the object form of the singular first-person pronoun.

NLT Translation Issues: 

7
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the normal verb translated as receive, but one that means "welcome."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "receive" is not an active verb but a participle, "welcoming."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the normal verb translated as receive, but one that means "welcome."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the normal verb translated as receive, but one that means "welcome."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "receive" is not an active verb but a participle, "welcoming."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "Father who" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."

The Spoken Version: 

“The real question is why should those good people we meet out on the road,” he said, “welcome those Jakob and Jon into their households?”
This got the crowd laughing again. Jon was Judas’s best friend.
“The one welcoming you all,” said the teacher smiling, “is welcoming me. And the one welcoming me is welcoming the one sending me.”
Judas pointed to the sky, copying the gesture the teacher uses at meetings.

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Apr 1 2020