Matthew 5:30 And if your right hand offend you,

Spoken to: 

an individual

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, adultery and sacrifice,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And if it is that right hand of yours, a hand and forearm, that trips you up, you should cut it out and toss away from you! Because it helps you when it destroys itself, one of those members of yours, and you don't want all that body of yours into Gehenna to depart [into death].

KJV : 

Matthew 5:30 And if thy right hand offend thee, cut it off, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

We can read this verse  as a series of humorous exaggerations to make his point. A number of subtle and not so subtle  differences distinguish it from the previous verse that looks similar.

The word translated as "right" here is different than the "right" in the previous verse. It means "right hand" so the word hand is repetitious, emphasizing it. The word translated as "cut it off" also means "cut it out" in the sense of stopping something. Since the context is sex and looking at a woman, we can easily imagine the humor about what the right hand should be stopped from doing.

The word translated as "cast/go/throw" into hell here is a different then the word translated as "cast/throw" into hell in the previous verse. It is also in a different place. The word means "depart" and "go away, but it is also  the word  used to mean "depart from life" as we say "the dear departed." This word is at the end of the verse because it is the verse's punchline, making Jesus's meaning clear.

NIV : 

Matthew 5:30  And if your right hand causes you to stumble, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to lose one part of your body than for your whole body to go into hell.

NLT : 

Matthew 5:30 And if your hand—even your stronger hand—causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to lose one part of your body than for your whole body to be thrown into hell.

Wordplay: 

 Double meaning of the word meaning "to cut it out" and to "knock it off." 

My Takeaway: 

What you do visibly leads to how you do eventually.

Related Verses: 

Mat 5:29 And if your right eye offend you,

Mat 5:30 And if your right hand offend you,

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἰ (conj) "If" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

 (article sg fem nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

δεξιά [unique](noun sg fem nom) "Right" is dexia, which means "the right hand". It also means a salute with a hand as a sign or "assurance," "pledge," or "treaty."  This is a noun form of the adjective "right", dexios. We know this is a noun not an adjective because it is followed by the word meaning "of yours" separating it from the "hand" below.

σου (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

χεὶρ (noun sg fem nom) "Hand" is from cheir which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

σκανδαλίζει (3rd sg pres ind act) "Offend" is from skandalizo, which means "to cause to stumble", "to give offense," and "to scandalize."

σε, (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from su which means "you" and "your."

ἔκκοψον (2nd sg aor imperat act) "Cut...off" is from ekkopto, which means "to cut out", "to knock off", "to beat off [in battle]", "to hinder", "to break open", "to win [in throwing dice]", "to erase [an inscription]," "to come to a stop", "to stamp a coin", "to pause," or "to cut off." It is also a metaphor for "to make an end of."

αὐτὴν (adj sg fem acc) "It" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

βάλε (2nd sg aor imperat act) "Cast" is from ballo (ballo), which means "to throw", "to let fall", "to put", "to pour," or "to cast."

ἀπὸ (prep) "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

σοῦ, (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thee" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

συμφέρει (3rd sg pres ind act) "It is profitable " is from symphero, which means "to bring together", "to gather", "collect", "to confer a benefit", "to be useful", "work with", "be with," and "agree with." In the passive, it means "to come together", "to engage", "to battle," [of events] "to occur", "to happen," and [literally] "to be carried along with."

γάρ (partic) "For" comes gar, which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

σοι (pron 2nd sg dat) "For you" is from su which means "you" and "your."

ἵνα (conj) "That" is from hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

ἀπόληται (3rd sg aor subj mid) "Should perish" is from apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone."

ἓν (noun sg neut nom) "One" is from heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

τῶν (article pl neut gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

μελῶν (noun pl neut gen)"Members" is from melos, which means "limb", "feature", "form", "a musical phrase," and "the music to which a song is set."

σου (pron 2nd pl gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ὅλον (adj sg neut nom/acc) "Whole" is from holos (holos), which means "the whole", "entire", "the universe," and "safe and sound."

τὸ  (article sg neut nom/acc) "That" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

σῶμά (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Body" is soma, which is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people.

σου (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

γέενναν: (noun sg fem acc) "Hell" is geenna, which is Greek for Gehenna, the valley of Hinnom (the Hebrew word), south of Jerusalem where trash, including diseased animals and human corpses was burned. A constant fire was kept burning there. This area was originally where children were sacrificed to Baal, and Baal (Beelzebub, "lord of the flies") is the name that Christ says others call him as the personification of evil.

ἀπέλθῃ. (3rd sg aor subj act) "Cast" is aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

KJV Analysis: 

And  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

right -- (MW) The word translated as "right" actually means "right hand." It is not the adjective "right" that we saw in the previous verse, but the noun, "right hand." It also means a salute with a hand as a sign or "assurance," "pledge," or "treaty." Unlike the word below, it only refers to the hand not to the hand and forearm. We know this is a noun not an adjective because it is followed by the word meaning "of yours" separating it from the "hand" below.

hand -- Another Greek word for "hand" appears here, meaning "hand and forearm". This word acts as a clarification. It has a number of the same shades of meaning. Some are the same as English. For example, it means giving aid in the sense of "giving someone a hand." It also means an act or deed, as we might say "having a hand in doing something." However, those don't seem to come into play here. Notice how this repetition echoes a different from of repetition of "eye" in the previous verse. Again, this seems largely for humorous affect.

offend -- (WW)  "Offend" is a verb that means "to cause to stumble" or "to trip up." From there it is assumed by its translators to mean "to give offense" and "to scandalize." Our word "scandalize" come directly from the Greek. However, this interpretation of the word only comes from the translators of the Gospels. Literally, it is a made up word like "stumblize."

thee, -- The word for "thee" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

cut --  The word translated in KJV as "cut it off" means "cut it out" and "knock it off." In Greek, this word is even broader than in English. It shares meaning with its English counterpart of stopping doing something. Since we are talking about doing something with one hand in an erotic context, it is not hard to imagine the humor here.

it -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

off,  -- This is from the prefix of the previous verb that means "from" or "out of." It is the same prefix as used in the "pluck out" verb in the previous verse.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

cast -- The Greek word translated as "cast" means "to throw" or "to toss." Christ uses it most commonly in the sense of "tossing out" something from demons to trash. Like our word, "to toss" it takes on a humorous feeling the way Jesus uses it.

it  -- This English objective pronoun is added and not in the Greek source.   In Greek, pronoun objects are not repeated after each verb because they are implied by their first occurrence.

from  -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

thee: -- The word translated as "thee" is the form of the second person pronoun required by the preposition to show motion.

for  --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause". 

it -- - This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb, which is expressed here as an adjective.

profitable -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "profitable" is a verb that primarily means "bring together" and "to gather." In English, we use "assist" in the same sense. So it also means to "work with", "help", or "be useful" in the sense of conferring a benefit. In an adjective form (not used here), it has the sense of "fitting" and "useful". The sense is that "it is good for one."

for - This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use. That preposition could be a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on," depending on the context. 

thee  -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

that -- The word translated as "that" is an adverb or conjunction that starts a subordinate clause "there", "where," and "in order that."

one -- The Greek word translated as "one thing" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."The word the subject of the word translated as "perish."

 of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

thy    -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

members -- The word translated as "member" primarily means "limb." However, it also means a "feature," that is, a part of the whole. However, coupled with the one, it suggests a double entendre for another part of the body that is more like a limb.

should -- The helping verb here is from the form of the verb that often requires a "should" or "might" because it indicates a possibility.

perish, -- (WW) The word translated as "perish" also means "to lose." Jesus often uses it to mean "to destroy", but in a form where the thing (here the number "one") acts on itself, so "destroy itself."

missing "by/for itself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act for, or, or by itself.

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

not -- (CW) The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true  With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. Here, it precedes "whole."

that   -- The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

thy    -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

whole  -- The word translated as "whole" means something that is "complete" or "the whole" of something, and can mean "the whole universe" as well as being "safe and sound" in being kept "whole."

body -- The word translated as "body" means "body", either living or dead, but it also means anything physical or solid. Like our word "body" it has special meanings such as "body" of proof and the "body" of a document. It is the opposite of "spirit" but more connected to the "soul" because it is part of this life. It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. See this article for more.

should -- The helping verb here is from the form of the verb that often requires a "should" or "might" because it indicates a possibility.

be -- (WV) This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive, but the verb is active. In this verseHelping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

cast -- (OS) The Greek verb translated as  "cast" means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."  The final keyword here describes what happens to the whole body. In the source for the KJV, the verb seems the same as the previous verse, but in the Greek sources that we use today, it is a different word, one meaning to "go away" and "to depart." It is a metaphor from departing from life.

into  -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

hell. -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "hell" refers to the trash dump outside of Jerusalem. See this article on the words for "hell". 

KJV Translation Issues: 

11
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "right" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "hand" is not shown as repeated in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "offend" should be "trip up."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "profitable" should be "helps."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "members" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "perish" should be "lose" or "destroy."
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "itself" as its object.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" here is not the simple negative but one the refers to desire or thought.
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is not passive as indicated by the "be" here.
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "cast" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hell" should be "Gehenna," the name of a trash dump.

NIV Analysis: 

And  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

your -- The word translated as "your" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

right -- (MW) The word translated as "right" actually means "right hand." It is not the adjective "right" that we saw in the previous verse, but the noun, "right hand." It also means a salute with a hand as a sign or "assurance," "pledge," or "treaty." Unlike the word below, it only refers to the hand not to the hand and forearm. We know this is a noun not an adjective because it is followed by the word meaning "of yours" separating it from the "hand" below.

hand -- Another Greek word for "hand" appears here, meaning "hand and forearm". This word appears after the word meaning "right hand" and acts as a clarification. It has a number of the same shades of meaning as English. For example, it means giving aid in the sense of "giving someone a hand." It also means an act or deed, as we might say "having a hand in doing something." However, those don't seem to come into play here. Notice how this repetition echoes a different from of repetition of "eye" in the previous verse. Again, this seems largely for humorous effect.

causes --  "Causes" is the verb part of the phrase "to cause to stumble" or "to trip up." , it is a made up word like "stumblize."

you, -- The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English. The Greek verb is not an infinitive but needed for the way the verb is translated into English. 

stumble, "Stumble" is the intransitive verb part of the phrase "to cause to stumble" or "to trip up." From there it is assumed by its translators to mean "to give offense" and "to scandalize." Our word "scandalize" come directly from the Greek. However, this interpretation of the word only comes from the translators of the Gospels. Literally, it is a made-up word like "stumblize."

cut --  The word translated in KJV as "cut it off" means "cut it out" and "knock it off." In Greek, this word is even broader than in English. It shares meaning with its English counterpart of stopping doing something. Since we are talking about doing something with one hand in an erotic context, it is not hard to imagine the humor here.

it -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

off,  -- This is from the prefix of the previous verb that means "from" or "out of." It is the same prefix as used in the "pluck out" verb in the previous verse.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

throw -- The Greek word translated as "throw" means "to throw" or "to toss." Christ uses it most commonly in the sense of "tossing out" something from demons to trash. Like our word, "to toss" it takes on a humorous feeling the way Jesus uses it.

it  -- This English objective pronoun is added and not in the Greek source.   In Greek, pronoun objects are not repeated after each verb because they are implied by their first occurrence.

away-- The word translated as "away" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

untranslated "you"-- (MW) The untranslated word "you" is the form of the second person pronoun required by the preposition to show motion.

untranslated "because"-- (MW) The untranslated word "because" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause". 

it -- - This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb, which is expressed here as an adjective.

better -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "better" is a verb that primarily means "bring together" and "to gather." In English, we use "assist" in the same sense. So it also means to "work with", "help", or "be useful" in the sense of conferring a benefit. In an adjective form (not used here), it has the sense of "fitting" and "useful". The sense is that "it is good for one."

for - This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use. That preposition could be a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on," depending on the context. 

you -- The word translated as "you" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

to -- (WF) The helping verb here indicates an infinitive verb, but the form of the verb is one that often requires a "should" or "might" because it indicates a possibility.

lose --  The word translated as "perish" also means "to lose." Jesus often uses it to mean "to destroy", but in a form where the thing (here the number "one") acts on itself, so "destroy itself."

missing "by/for itself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act for, or, or by itself.

untranslated "where"-- (MW) The untranslated word "where" is an adverb or conjunction that starts a subordinate clause "there", "where," and "in order that."

one -- The Greek word translated as "one" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."The word the subject of the word translated as "perish."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

part -- The word translated as "part" primarily means "limb." However, it also means a "feature," that is, a part of the whole. However, coupled with the one, it suggests a double entendre for another part of the body that is more like a limb.

untranslated "of yours "-- (MW) The untranslated word "of yours" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

of your body than -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "of your body than" in the Greek source.

for -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

untranslated "not want"  -- (MW) The untranslated word here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true  With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. Here, it precedes "whole."

your     -- The word translated as "your" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

whole  -- The word translated as "whole" means something that is "complete" or "the whole" of something, and can mean "the whole universe" as well as being "safe and sound" in being kept "whole."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more.

body -- The word translated as "body" means "body", either living or dead, but it also means anything physical or solid. Like our word "body" it has special meanings such as "body" of proof and the "body" of a document. It is the opposite of "spirit" but more connected to the "soul" because it is part of this life. It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. See this article for more.

to -- (WF) The helping verb here indicates an infinitive verb, but the form of the verb is one that often requires a "should" or "might" because it indicates a possibility.

go -- (CW)The Greek verb translated as  "go" means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."  The final keyword here describes what happens to the whole body. In the source for the KJV, the verb seems the same as the previous verse, but in the Greek sources that we use today, it is a different word, one meaning to "go away" and "to depart." It is a metaphor from departing from life.

into  -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

hell. -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "hell" refers to the trash dump outside of Jerusalem. See this article on the words for "hell". 

NIV Translation Issues: 

17
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "right" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "hand" is not shown as repeated in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "better" should be "helps."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "to lose" is not an infinitive but a subjective, "should lose."
  • WV - Wrong Voice -- The word translated as "lose" should be "lose itself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "where" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "members" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of yours" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "of your body than" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for" should be "and."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "not want" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "body" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "to" is not an infinitive but a subjective, "should."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "go" is not the common go, but a word meaning "go away."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hell" should be "Gehenna," the name of a trash dump.

NLT Analysis: 

And  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

your -- The word translated as "your" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

hand -- (WP) A Greek word for "hand" appears later in verse, meaning "hand and forearm" though it is usually translated simple as "hand." This word appears after the word translated as "stronger hand" and acts as a clarification. It has a number of the same shades of meaning as English. For example, it means giving aid in the sense of "giving someone a hand." It also means an act or deed, as we might say "having a hand in doing something." However, those don't seem to come into play here. Notice how this repetition echoes a different from of repetition of "eye" in the previous verse. Again, this seems largely for humorous effect.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

even your -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "even you" in the Greek source.

stronger hand -- (CW) The word translated as "stronger hand" actually means "right hand." It is not the adjective "right" that we saw in the previous verse, but the noun, "right hand." It also means a salute with a hand as a sign or "assurance," "pledge," or "treaty." Unlike the word above, it only refers to the hand not to the hand and forearm. We know this is a noun not an adjective because it is followed by the word meaning "of yours" separating it from the "hand" below.

causes --  "Causes" is the verb part of the phrase "to cause to stumble" or "to trip up." , it is a made up word like "stumblize."

you, -- The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English. The Greek verb is not an infinitive but needed for the way the verb is translated into English. 

sin -- (WW) "Sin" is the intransitive verb part of the phrase "to cause to stumble" or "to trip up." From there it is assumed by its translators to mean "to give offense" and "to scandalize." Our word "scandalize" come directly from the Greek. However, this interpretation of the word only comes from the translators of the Gospels. Literally, it is a made-up word like "stumblize."

cut --  The word translated in KJV as "cut it off" means "cut it out" and "knock it off." In Greek, this word is even broader than in English. It shares meaning with its English counterpart of stopping doing something. Since we are talking about doing something with one hand in an erotic context, it is not hard to imagine the humor here.

it -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

off,  -- This is from the prefix of the previous verb that means "from" or "out of." It is the same prefix as used in the "pluck out" verb in the previous verse.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

throw -- The Greek word translated as "throw" means "to throw" or "to toss." Christ uses it most commonly in the sense of "tossing out" something from demons to trash. Like our word, "to toss" it takes on a humorous feeling the way Jesus uses it.

it  -- This English objective pronoun is added and not in the Greek source.   In Greek, pronoun objects are not repeated after each verb because they are implied by their first occurrence.

away-- The word translated as "away" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

untranslated "you"-- (MW) The untranslated word "you" is the form of the second person pronoun required by the preposition to show motion.

untranslated "because"-- (MW) The untranslated word "because" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause". 

it -- - This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb, which is expressed here as an adjective.

better -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "better" is a verb that primarily means "bring together" and "to gather." In English, we use "assist" in the same sense. So it also means to "work with", "help", or "be useful" in the sense of conferring a benefit. In an adjective form (not used here), it has the sense of "fitting" and "useful". The sense is that "it is good for one."

for - This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use. That preposition could be a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on," depending on the context. 

you -- The word translated as "you" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

to -- (WF) The helping verb here indicates an infinitive verb, but the form of the verb is one that often requires a "should" or "might" because it indicates a possibility.

lose --  The word translated as "perish" also means "to lose." Jesus often uses it to mean "to destroy", but in a form where the thing (here the number "one") acts on itself, so "destroy itself."

missing "by/for itself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act for, or, or by itself.

untranslated "where"-- (MW) The untranslated word "where" is an adverb or conjunction that starts a subordinate clause "there", "where," and "in order that."

one -- The Greek word translated as "one" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."The word the subject of the word translated as "perish."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

part -- The word translated as "part" primarily means "limb." However, it also means a "feature," that is, a part of the whole. However, coupled with the one, it suggests a double entendre for another part of the body that is more like a limb.

untranslated "of yours "-- (MW) The untranslated word "of yours" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

of your body than -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "of your body than" in the Greek source.

for -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

untranslated "not want"  -- (MW) The untranslated word here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true  With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. Here, it precedes "whole."

your     -- The word translated as "your" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more.

whole  -- The word translated as "whole" means something that is "complete" or "the whole" of something, and can mean "the whole universe" as well as being "safe and sound" in being kept "whole."

body -- The word translated as "body" means "body", either living or dead, but it also means anything physical or solid. Like our word "body" it has special meanings such as "body" of proof and the "body" of a document. It is the opposite of "spirit" but more connected to the "soul" because it is part of this life. It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. See this article for more.

to -- (WF) The helping verb here indicates an infinitive verb, but the form of the verb is one that often requires a "should" or "might" because it indicates a possibility.

be -- (WV) This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive, but the verb is active. In this verseHelping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

thrown -- (WW) The Greek verb translated as  "thrown" means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."  The final keyword here describes what happens to the whole body. In the source for the KJV, the verb seems the same as the previous verse, but in the Greek sources that we use today, it is a different word, one meaning to "go away" and "to depart." It is a metaphor from departing from life.

into  -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

hell. -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "hell" refers to the trash dump outside of Jerusalem. See this article on the words for "hell". 

NLT Translation Issues: 

20
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "hand" doesn't appear here but after the other "hand."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "right" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "even your" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "stronger hand" is really "right hand."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "sin" should be "trip up."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "better" should be "helps."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "to lose" is not an infinitive but a subjective, "should lose."
  • WV - Wrong Voice -- The word translated as "lose" should be "lose itself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "members" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "where" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of yours" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "of your body than" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for" should be "and."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "not want" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "body" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "to " is not an infinitive but a subjective, "should."
  • WV - Wrong Voice - The verb "be" here is makes the verb  passive but it is active.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "thrown" should be "depart."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hell" should be "Gehenna," the name of a trash dump.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

It is easier to stop thoughts than it is to stop physical practices, but the spiritual is more important than the physical. What Jesus is saying, however, is that this is serious businesses, a matter of life and death, and a matter that transcends physical death. In that perspective, giving up a part of our life, something we enjoy. However, as Jesus says, it is better to lose a part of our body than all of our life. The whole is greater than the parts.

The Spoken Version: 

“My little member isn’t bothered by my right eye,” I called out, “but by my right hand and forearm here!”
Much to my embarrassment now, I bared and raised my right hand with its fingers curved, bared my arms, and made a pumping motion.
There was laughter, but mostly I heard the moans and boos.
The Master rolled his eyes up to the sky and shook his head sadly.
Then he smiled at me, looking directly into my eyes. His gaze made me feel warm and happy despite being drunk.
“And if,” he responded patiently, holding up his own right hand, “that right of yours—”
He thought for a moment.
“A hand and forearm,” he said correcting himself, pulling his sleeve up further to show his forearm.
The crowd laughed remembering my earlier demonstration.
“Trips you up,” he continued, pretending to trip himself with his arm and repeating his exaggerated stumble for the crowd.
The crowd laughed appreciatively.
“Lop it off!” he commanded me in a mock serious tone.
The Master held out his bare right hand and forearm and pretended to chop it off with his left. As he did, he pulled his hand and forearm up his sleeve and waved the floppy cuff as though he had chopped off his hand.
“And toss it away from you!” he continued, performing his tossing-out-the-trash gesture with one hand and a floppy sleeve. “Because it helps you when it destroys itself, one of those...”
He pushed his right hand out of its sleeve and held it up, wiggling his fingers.
“Members of yours,” he said to me with a big smile. This time, the word actually applied to the body part that was being tossed out.
The crowd laughed harder and started applauding.
“And you don’t want all that body of yours,” he said, indicating my body from head to toe and pretending to pick up something heavy again.
The crowd laughed in anticipation.
“Into Gehenna!” he shouted, repeating his throwing-out-the-trash gesture and again holding his nose.
Everyone laughed and cheered.
Then he spread his arms as if in prayer and solemnly intoned a phrase from Judean funerals, “Away it goes.”

evidence: 

29.00

Front Page Date: 

May 6 2020