Matthew 6:10 Your kingdom come...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Let it show up, this realm of yours. Let it happen, that desire of yours, as in sky also on earth.

KJV : 

Matthew 6:10 Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

All English translations follow the KJV and copy its many problems. The translation of the Greek verb as "come" loses its primary meaning, which fits better with the context of a "kingdom" since kingdoms do not move.  The translation of the next verb as "done" is even worse because this is not the verb translated as "do" in the Bible. The third verb, "it is" doesn't exist in the Greek at all. However, the biggest problem is that the final two phrases "upon earth" and "in sky" are reversed, the "as"  appears before them, not between, and an "and" or "also" that does appear between them isn't translated.

So, what is this kingdom of the Divine that Jesus also called the realm of the skies?  We cannot know it directly, but we can know it by way of analogy. What is the realm of a father when compared to the realm of a child? Fathers live in a bigger universe than their children. (See this article) The "skies" is the way this realm is described in the prayer, but let us think about it as the world of adulthood, the realm of maturity from a spiritual perspective. We hope that the world of that spiritual maturity is arriving for us or at least showing up. We as asking to glimpse our spiritual maturity by the "realm of the skies" showing up.

NIV : 

Matthew 6:10  your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

NLT : 

Matthew 6:10 May your Kingdom come soon. May your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.

Wordplay: 

The "reign" of God is equated with the coming into being of his will both in the universe and on our planet. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἐλθάτω (3rd sg aor imperat act) "Come" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

(article sg fem nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom ) "Kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," "being ruled by a king (passive)," and "a reign."

σου, (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

γενηθήτω (3rd sg aor imperat pass) "Be" is from ginomai), which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

τὸ (article sg neut nom/acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

θέλημά (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Will" is from the noun, thelema, which means "will" and "pleasure."

σου, (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

ὡς (conj) "As" is from hos, which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that.

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

οὐρανῷ (noun sg masc dat) "Heaven" is from ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate." See this article for more perspective on the word and how Christ uses it.

καὶ (conj/adv) Untranslated is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐπὶ (prep) "Against" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

γῆς: (noun sg fem gen) "Earth" is from ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet.

KJV Analysis: 

Thy --The "thy" appears after the word rather than before. The form is "the kingship of yours" or "that kingship of your" since the article, "the", is closer to a demonstrative, "this" or "that". 

- untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

kingdom -- The word translated as "thy kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Though it is the subject of the verb, in the Greek, it follows it, meaning it is less important. In English, our word "kingship" comes closest to the bread of this idea since it encompasses the realm, the power, and the reign of a king. 

come. --  (CW) The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. "Show up" is also a good fit because Jesus's central message is that "the realm of the skies has neared." If we cannot see it, it is not because it is far away. It is because it is not that visible from our perspective. This word is in the form of a command addressed to a third partyt, which is a form we don't have in English. This is usually translated as a command to "let" something occur, but "it must" occur also works.

Thy -- The "thy" is the second person pronoun in a possessive form. It appears after the word rather than before so "of yours." The form is "the kingship of yours" or "that kingship of your" since the article, "the", is closer to a demonstrative, "this" or "that". 

- untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

will -- The word translated as "will" means what someone wants or desires. It also means a desire or a choice. If God did not restrict his powers, he would have no desires, but since he restricts himself to allow for human freedom of choice, his desires are  restricting to the realm of free will: that is, he desire for us to make the right choices just like any father desires his children to make the right choices.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

done -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "done" means "to become" and "to come into being," not "to do." In other words, it is not the Greek word usually translated as "to do" in the KJV. It again a command to an object, God's will. It is also in the passive so it means "let come into being" or "it must come into being." However, for events, it means "let it happen", which is the sense here.

in -- (WWThe preposition used to introduce "in earth" is different from the preposition used for "in heaven". It is the preposition that means "on", "upon", or "against". This is the preposition that Jesus usually used to refer to things on this planet or on the ground.

earth, -- The word used for "earth" is the word that Christ uses tor refer to the planet, that is, the physical world, but this word also simply means "ground" or simply "dirt". See this article for more perspective on both this word and the word "heaven". Again, no article is used to introduce the word.

as -- (WP) The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words. It  precedes both the "in heaven" phrase and "in earth" phrases. This word does not separate or compare these two phrases. Instead, it sets both phrases off as examples of the same thing.

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").  It appears before the "upon earth," but that phrase appears at the end of the verse. 

it is -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "it is" in the Greek source.

in -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "in" means "in", "on", or "within". This is the usual preposition Jesus uses to refer to what takes place "in the skies". This phrase appears before "upon earth."

heaven. -- The Greek word translated as "heaven" means "sky". This word is singular. However, in the previous verse, Mat 6:9, the same word was plural though introduced by the same preposition but referring to the Father. See this article for more perspective on this word and how Christ uses it. Also, unlike the previous verse, there is no article, "the", introducing this word.

KJV Translation Issues: 

9
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "come" is just one meaning of this word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "done" means "happen."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "in" means "upon."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "as" doesn't appear here but before the verb for rest.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "in heaven" appears before "upon earth."

NIV Analysis: 

your --The "your" appears after the word rather than before. The form is "the kingship of yours" or "that kingship of your" since the article, "the", is closer to a demonstrative, "this" or "that". 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

kingdom -- The word translated as "thy kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Though it is the subject of the verb, in the Greek, it follows it, meaning it is less important. In English, our word "kingship" comes closest to the bread of this idea since it encompasses the realm, the power, and the reign of a king. 

come. --  (CW) The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. "Show up" is also a good fit because Jesus's central message is that "the realm of the skies has neared." If we cannot see it, it is not because it is far away. It is because it is not that visible from our perspective. This word is in the form of a command addressed to a third partyt, which is a form we don't have in English. This is usually translated as a command to "let" something occur, but "it must" occur also works.

your -- The "your" is the second person pronoun in a possessive form. It appears after the word rather than before so "of yours." The form is "the kingship of yours" or "that kingship of your" since the article, "the", is closer to a demonstrative, "this" or "that". 

- untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

will -- The word translated as "will" means what someone wants or desires. It also means a desire or a choice. If God did not restrict his powers, he would have no desires, but since he restricts himself to allow for human freedom of choice, his desires are  restricting to the realm of free will: that is, he desire for us to make the right choices just like any father desires his children to make the right choices.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

done -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "done" means "to become" and "to come into being," not "to do." In other words, it is not the Greek word usually translated as "to do" in the KJV. It again a command to an object, God's will. It is also in the passive so it means "let come into being" or "it must come into being." However, for events, it means "let it happen", which is the sense here.

on --The preposition means "on", "upon", or "against". This is the preposition that Jesus usually used to refer to things on this planet or on the ground.

earth, -- The word used for "earth" is the word that Christ uses tor refer to the planet, that is, the physical world, but this word also simply means "ground" or simply "dirt". See this article for more perspective on both this word and the word "heaven". Again, no article is used to introduce the word.

as -- (WP) The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words. It  precedes both the "in heaven" phrase and "in earth" phrases. This word does not separate or compare these two phrases. Instead, it sets both phrases off as examples of the same thing.

it is -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "it is" in the Greek source.

in -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "in" means "in", "on", or "within". This is the usual preposition Jesus uses to refer to what takes place "in the skies". This phrase appears before "upon earth."

heaven. -- The Greek word translated as "heaven" means "sky". This word is singular. However, in the previous verse, Mat 6:9, the same word was plural though introduced by the same preposition but referring to the Father. See this article for more perspective on this word and how Christ uses it. Also, unlike the previous verse, there is no article, "the", introducing this word.

NIV Translation Issues: 

8
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "come" is just one meaning of this word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "done" means "happen."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "as" doesn't appear here but before the verb for rest.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "in heaven" appears before "upon earth."

NLT Analysis: 

May -- (IW) There is no Greek word or verb form that can be translated as "may" in the Greek source.

your --The "your" appears after the word rather than before. The form is "the kingship of yours" or "that kingship of your" since the article, "the", is closer to a demonstrative, "this" or "that". 

- untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Kingdom -- The word translated as "thy kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Though it is the subject of the verb, in the Greek, it follows it, meaning it is less important. In English, our word "kingship" comes closest to the bread of this idea since it encompasses the realm, the power, and the reign of a king. 

come. --  (CW) The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. "Show up" is also a good fit because Jesus's central message is that "the realm of the skies has neared." If we cannot see it, it is not because it is far away. It is because it is not that visible from our perspective. This word is in the form of a command addressed to a third partyt, which is a form we don't have in English. This is usually translated as a command to "let" something occur, but "it must" occur also works.

soon -- (IW) There is no Greek word  that can be translated as "soon" in the Greek source.

May -- (IW) There is no Greek word or verb form that can be translated as "may" in the Greek source.

your -- The "your" is the second person pronoun in a possessive form. It appears after the word rather than before so "of yours." The form is "the kingship of yours" or "that kingship of your" since the article, "the", is closer to a demonstrative, "this" or "that". 

- untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

will -- The word translated as "will" means what someone wants or desires. It also means a desire or a choice. If God did not restrict his powers, he would have no desires, but since he restricts himself to allow for human freedom of choice, his desires are  restricting to the realm of free will: that is, he desire for us to make the right choices just like any father desires his children to make the right choices.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

done -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "done" means "to become" and "to come into being," not "to do." In other words, it is not the Greek word usually translated as "to do" in the KJV. It again a command to an object, God's will. It is also in the passive so it means "let come into being" or "it must come into being." However, for events, it means "let it happen", which is the sense here.

on --The preposition means "on", "upon", or "against". This is the preposition that Jesus usually used to refer to things on this planet or on the ground.

earth, -- The word used for "earth" is the word that Christ uses tor refer to the planet, that is, the physical world, but this word also simply means "ground" or simply "dirt". See this article for more perspective on both this word and the word "heaven". Again, no article is used to introduce the word.

as -- (WP) The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words. It  precedes both the "in heaven" phrase and "in earth" phrases. This word does not separate or compare these two phrases. Instead, it sets both phrases off as examples of the same thing.

it is -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "it is" in the Greek source.

in -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "in" means "in", "on", or "within". This is the usual preposition Jesus uses to refer to what takes place "in the skies". This phrase appears before "upon earth."

heaven. -- The Greek word translated as "heaven" means "sky". This word is singular. However, in the previous verse, Mat 6:9, the same word was plural though introduced by the same preposition but referring to the Father. See this article for more perspective on this word and how Christ uses it. Also, unlike the previous verse, there is no article, "the", introducing this word.

NLT Translation Issues: 

11
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "may" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "come" is just one meaning of this word.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "soon" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "may" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "done" means "happen."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "as" doesn't appear here but before the verb for rest.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "in heaven" appears before "upon earth."

The Spoken Version: 

“It is starting—that reign of Yours.
“It is coming into being—that purpose of Yours, as much as possible in sky and on earth.

evidence: 

57.00

Front Page Date: 

Feb 12 2020