Matthew 6:5 And when you pray,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, debts and repayment, virtue and virtue signaling

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Also, when you all pray for yourselves. No, you will not be like those actors because they prefer, in the meeting places and in the corners of the broadways, having stood to offer prayers for themselves. This is so they might be shining among the people. Truly, I tell you: they have received that compensation of theirs.

KJV : 

Matthew 6:5 And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There is a lot of interesting and fun ideas here that are lost in translation. This verse echoes Matthew 6:2 in its reference to hypocrites and it ends in that same catchphrase, "they have their reward," used here for the second time. But Matthew 6:2 was spoken to an individual and this verse is spoken to the crowd.  So Jesus takes ideas developed in individual encounters and works them into his lessons. He uses repetition for humor. One change from the earlier version is that a different word for "streets" is used tp reference "actors" on "Broadway".

This is the first use by Jesus of one of two Greek words that are translated as "love."  These words mean different things bit those differences are lost in Biblical translation, which seems tragic. The verb here expresses a preference or a liking for something or someone.  It's meaning is more similar to the English "like" or "prefer" than "love." More on the two types of "love" in this article. All earlier verses use the other terms for "love" not this one.

This is also the first use of a word mistranslated as "seen" here, which actuall means "to shine." This word has the same root as the word "prophet," which really means "shining light" and "enlightened." The image here is of actors wanting to shine among men. This is a pretty good description of what actors want.

NIV : 

Matthew 6:5  And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by others. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward in full.

Wordplay: 

 Saying that actors love to stand on Broadway and "shine." 

My Takeaway: 

Virtue signaling fills up your visible ego, but it starves the hidden Divine within you.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὅταν (conj) "When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)."

προσεύχησθε, (2nd pl pres subj mp) "Thou prayest" is from proseuchomai which means "to offer prayers or vows", "to worship," and "to pray for a thing." It is the combination of two Greek word, pros, meaning "towards" or "by reason of," and euchomai, meaning "to pray to God."

οὐκ (adv) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔσεσθε (2nd pl fut ind mid) "Thou shalt" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai.)

ὡς (adv) "As" is from hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that."

οἱ (article) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

ὑποκριταί: (noun sg masc dat) "The hypocrites" is hypokrites means "interpreter" or "actor."

ὅτι (conj) "For" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

φιλοῦσιν (3rd pl pres ind act) "They love" is from phileo , which means "to love", "to regard with affection", "to kiss," and "to approve of."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ταῖς (article pl fem dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

συναγωγαῖς (noun pl fem dat ) "Synagogue" is from synagoge, which means a "bringing together", "assembly", "place of assembly", "contracting", "collection", "combination", "conclusion," and "demonstration." It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐν (prep) In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ταῖς (article pl fem dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

γωνίαι  [4 verses](adj pl fem dat) "The corners" is gonia, which means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people."

τῶν (article pl fem gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

πλατειῶν (adj pl fem gen) "Of the streets" is from plateia, which is an adjective that means "wide", "broad", "over a wide area", "broad shouldered [of a man]", "far advanced [of seasons]", "strong [oath]", "widespread", "flat of the hand", "frequent," and "street."

ἑστῶτες (part pl perf act masc nom) "Standing" is from histemi, which means "to make to stand", "to stand", "to set up", "to bring to a standstill", "to check", "to appoint", "to establish", "to fix by agreement", "to be placed", "to be set", "to stand still", "to stand firm", "to set upright", "to erected", "to arise," and "to place." Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

προσεύχεσθαι, (pres inf mp) "To pray" is from proseuchomai which means "to offer prayers or vows", "to worship," and "to pray for a thing." It is the combination of two Greek word, pros, meaning "towards" or "by reason of," and euchomai, meaning "to pray to God."

ὅπως (conj) "That" is from hopos, which is a conjunction that means "in such a manner as", "in order that", "in the manner in which", "how," [with negative] "there is no way that," and [in questions] "in what way."

φανῶσιν (3rd pl aor subj pass) "They...be seen" is from phaino , which means "to shine", "to give light," and "to appear." In its transitive form, not used here, it means "bring to light."

τοῖς (article pl masc dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

ἀνθρώποις: (noun pl masc dat) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "man" in the plural means "people" and "humanity" in general.

ἀμὴν (exclam) "Verily" is from amen, which is from the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek before the NT.

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is from llego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl ) "To you" is from hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. -- The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

ἀπέχουσι (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "They have"" is from apecho, which means "to keep off or away from", "to hold one's hands off or away from", "to hold oneself off a thing", "to abstain or desist from it," "to project", "to extend", "to be far from," and "to receive payment in full."

τὸν (article sg masc acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

μισθὸν (noun sg masc acc) "Reward" is from misthos, which means "wages" in the sense of compensation for work done, "pay", "hire", "fee", "recompense," and "reward."

αὐτῶν. (adj pl masc gen) "Their" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

when -- The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition. The issue is time as much as a set of conditions.

thou  -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

prayest, -- The verb translated as "prayest" means both offering worship and making a request of the divine. The two concepts were closely tied in the Greek.

thou -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shalt -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. This is not the usual negative Christ uses in prohibitions. To capture is sense adding the word "really" captures it. This is not the negative used with commands or requests.

be -- (WF) The  verb "be" is from the verb "to be" in the future tense, but it is not a command, but a description of a future activity.

as -- The Greek word translated as "as" is an adverb that has the sense here of "just as" and "like".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

hypocrites -- (UW) The Greek word translated as "the hypocrites" is a great example of a word that has taken its English meaning from how it is used in the Bible rather than the original Greek. It means "actor" from its literal meaning, "under separation," which describe the separation between what is said and reality. Interesting enough, it also means "interpreter," which is another separation between what is said and reality.

are:  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "are" in the Greek source.

for"For" is another adverb meaning "seeing that" and "because".

they  -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

love -- (WW)  "They love" is one of two Greek words that are translated as "love" but mean different things. The verb expresses a preference or a liking for something or someone.  It's meaning is more like "like" than "love" in English. More on the two types of "love" in this article.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

pray -- The Greek word translated as "to pray" is the same as the word used at the beginning of this verse meaning "to pray" and "to worship". However, the word follows "standing" not "love" so the sense is "standing to pray" not "love to pray". It is in a form that the activity is done to or for those doing to it, so the sense is "praying for themselves".

missing "by/for themselves"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the previous word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for themselves" or "pray by themselves."

standing -- (WT) The word translated as "standing" means "to stand" and "to set up". However, it appears later in the Greek verse, after the "in the meeting places and in the corners" phrase. The specific description is of "standing to pray".

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within", "with," or "among" with a dative object as the one here. 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

synagogues -- (UW) The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word but it simply means an assembly or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can means "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

corners --  "The corners" is a noun that means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

streets, -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "street" is actually an adjective meaning "broad." This is  a different word that the one in the earlier version of this verse in  Matthew 6:2. It is means "street" in the exact same way as "Broadway" means a "main street." However, in an interesting coincidence, the verse puts actors on "Broadway" seems too perfect. It seems Jesus though that the word from street based on "broad" fit better than the one based on "rush" when describing actors.

that -- The word translated as "that" is one of those Greek words that introduce a new phrase that offers an explanation. It can be translated as a dependent clause, but if we start a new sentence with it, we get fewer run-on sentences.

they -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

may-- This helping verb "may" indicates that the verb indicates a possibility. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

seen --  (WW) The Greek word translated as "may be seen" is not a verb normally translated as "to see." It primarily means "to shine." The image is of actors wanting to shine among men. This is still a pretty good description of what actors want.

of --  (WW) This word "of" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "by" for agents works best here. This is not the preposition mistranslated as "of" in in  Matthew 6:2.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

men. The Greek word for "man" in the plural means "people" and "humanity" in general.

Verily -- The word translated as "verily" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap." See this article discussing this "amen phrase."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

you,  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc.

They -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

have -- (WW)  The Greek word translated as "have" is not the Greek word meaning "to have." This verb literally means "to have from" or "to keep from." The "have from" meaning in business translations becomes "to receive payment in full." The sense of "keep from" means  "to keep off or away from" or "to hold away from." So this word not only has a double meaning but , amusingly,  almost contradictory meanings. 

their -- The word translated as "their" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.   This pronoun follows the noun so "of theirs."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

reward. -- The Greek word translated as "reward" really means "compensation," what you receive for doing work. In Christ's teaching, there is spiritual compensation and worldly compensation.

KJV Translation Issues: 

14
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "be" is not a command, but part of a statement. The negative used with it is not the negative used with commands.
  • CW -- Confusing Word -- The "love" is a Greek word that is more like "like" than "love" in English.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "hypocrites" means "actors." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "are" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "love" should be "prefer" or "like."
  • WV - Wrong Voice - The verb "to pray: here is translated as active, but it is the middle form so the sense is "by or for themselves."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "standing" is the tense where something is completed in the past, "having stood."
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "synagogues" means "meeting." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "street" is not the "street" in the earlier template for this verse.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "seen" should be "shine."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "of" should be "by."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "men" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The verb translated as "have" should be "collect."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "reward" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

when -- The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition. The issue is time as much as a set of conditions.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

pray, -- The verb translated as "pray" means both offering worship and making a request of the divine. The two concepts were closely tied in the Greek.

do -- (WT) This helping verb is used to create commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement. Since the verb is the future tense, the helper verb should be "will.?

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. This is not the usual negative Christ uses in prohibitions. To capture is sense adding the word "really" captures it. This is not the negative used with commands or requests.

be -- (WF) The  verb "be" is from the verb "to be" in the future tense, but it is not a command, but a description of a future activity.

like -- The Greek word translated as "as" is an adverb that has the sense here of "just as" and "like".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

hypocrites -- (UW) The Greek word translated as "the hypocrites" is a great example of a word that has taken its English meaning from how it is used in the Bible rather than the original Greek. It means "actor" from its literal meaning, "under separation," which describe the separation between what is said and reality. Interesting enough, it also means "interpreter," which is another separation between what is said and reality.

for -- "For" is another adverb meaning "seeing that" and "because".

they  -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

love -- (WW)  "They love" is one of two Greek words that are translated as "love" but mean different things. The verb expresses a preference or a liking for something or someone.  It's meaning is more like "like" than "love" in English. More on the two types of "love" in this article.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

pray -- The Greek word translated as "to pray" is the same as the word used at the beginning of this verse meaning "to pray" and "to worship". However, the word follows "standing" not "love" so the sense is "standing to pray" not "love to pray". It is in a form that the activity is done to or for those doing to it, so the sense is "praying for themselves".

missing "by/for themselves"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the previous word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for themselves" or "pray by themselves."

standing -- (WT)  The word translated as "standing" means "to stand" and "to set up". However, it appears later in the Greek verse, after the "in the meeting places and in the corners" phrase. The specific description is of "standing to pray".

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within", "with," or "among" with a dative object as the one here. 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

synagogues -- (UW) The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word but it simply means an assembly or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

on -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can means "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near." Though technically it shouldn't be "on" because of the form fo the word, but this is how we say it in English.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the" before "streets." The Greek article is much closer

street, -- (CW, WN) The Greek word translated as "street" is actually an adjective meaning "broad." This is  a different word that the one in the earlier version of this verse in  Matthew 6:2. It is means "street" in the exact same way as "Broadway" means a "main street." However, in an interesting coincidence, the verse puts actors on "Broadway" seems too perfect. It seems Jesus though that the word from street based on "broad" fit better than the one based on "rush" when describing actors.

corners --  "The corners" is a noun that means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people."

untranslated "that"-- (MW) The untranslated word "that" is one of those Greek words that introduce a new phrase that offers an explanation. It can be translated as a dependent clause, but if we start a new sentence with it, we get fewer run-on sentences.

to -- (WF) This helping verb "to" indicates that the verb is an infinitive, but it isn't. The verb is active and indicates a possibility. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

seen --  (WW) The Greek word translated as "may be seen" is not a verb normally translated as "to see." It primarily means "to shine." The image is of actors wanting to shine among men. This is still a pretty good description of what actors want.

by -- This word "of" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "by" for agents works best here. This is not the preposition mistranslated as "of" in in  Matthew 6:2.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

others. -- (WW)  The Greek word for "man" in the plural means "people" and "humanity" in general.

Truly -- The word translated as "truly " is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap." See this article discussing this "amen phrase."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

tell -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you,  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. This is the first time Jesus addresses an individual with his catch phrase.

they -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

have received -- The Greek word translated as "have" is not the Greek word meaning "to have." This verb primarily means "to keep off or away from." It is a compound word "To have/hold from/away from". The "hold away from" means to "keep off", but the "to have from" means to be paid. Christ uses it here because it has the special meaning in business translations of "to receive payment in full." This is the sense that it is used here. The "to have from" or "to hold away from" and, amusingly,  almost contradictory meanings. 

their -- The word translated as "their" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.   This pronoun follows the noun so "of theirs."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

reward. -- The Greek word translated as "reward" really means "compensation," what you receive for doing work. In Christ's teaching, there is spiritual compensation and worldly compensation.

in full. -- These words are part of the concept of the verb.

NIV Translation Issues: 

17
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "do"  should be "will" to indicate the future tense of the verb.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "be" is not a command, but part of a statement. The negative used with it is not the negative used with commands.
  • CW -- Confusing Word -- The "love" is a Greek word that is more like "like" than "love" in English.
  • WV - Wrong Voice - The verb "to pray: here is translated as active, but it is the middle form so the sense is "by or for themselves."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "standing" is the tense where something is completed in the past, "having stood."
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "hypocrites" means "actors." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "are" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "love" should be "prefer" or "like."
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "synagogues" means "meeting." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "street" is not the "street" in the earlier template for this verse.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "street" is translated as singular but it is plural, "streets."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "to" should not indicate an infinitive.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "seen" should be "shine."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "men" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "others" should be "men."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "reward" is not shown in the English translation.

The Spoken Version: 

“But why shouldn’t we pray for ourselves in front of others,” moaned the mule-faced man.  “People should know that we are pious men.”
“No!” the Master responded to us all. “You are not going to want to be like those actors!”
He used using the same aristocratic tone saying, “those actors,” that he had used when speaking to Abbiah.
This drew a fresh laugh.
“No?” the Mule asked, sounding confused. “Why not?”
“Because they prefer,” he continued, tipping his nose up with his finger in a haughty way, “in those meetings and on those corners of the streets having stood up to pray for themselves.”
With his nose in the air, he raised his arms out to his sides in the Judean attitude of prayer. Then he move his lips and if praying and bowed quickly, in a perfunctory manner, as the Judeans do in prayer.  He repeated this bow over and over again, more and more quickly.  With his comic exaggeration, it was clear that the praying and bowing was less about reverence that it was getting attention.
We began laughing.
“So that they might be shining,” he explained, waving his outstretched hands as if calling for attention, “to those people!”
He said “those people” again mimicking Abbiah’s earlier tone.
We laughed louder.
“Honestly, I am talking to you all,” the Teacher continued confidently, putting his hand to his heart.
The familiar line and gesture drew another laugh.
“They are getting paid in full that reward of theirs,” he announced happily.

evidence: 

52.00

Front Page Date: 

May 28 2020