Matthew 6:9 Therefore you should pray like this...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

In this way, then, you yourselves pray for yourselves: Father of ours, that one in the heavens, let it be sanctified, this name of yours.

KJV : 

Matthew 6:9 After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

One thing that is always lost in translation is how Jesus continually switches back and forth from addressing the crowd generally with the plural "you" and addressing individual people with the singular "you".  Here, Jesus accentuates the plural you, using a pronoun subject that gives the sense of "you yourselves" to the subject of praying. The "praying" is also in the middle voice which has the sense of "for/by yourselves."

The next line in the Greek is simpler than the English translations. It means simply, "in the skies." The word "skies" doesn't refer to our relgious  concept of "heaven." It couldn't. The word is plural, "skies."  There isn't more than one "heaven" so Biblical translated never translate it in the plural. The Greek word is also introduced by a definite article, which, in Greek, is more like our demonstrative article, "these," so "these skies."  We don't use a definite article with "heaven" because there is only one heaven from a religious concept, but there are many different skies: the sun-lit sky, the night sky, the cloudy sky, the night sky in winter, the night sky in summer, and so on.

However, there is more to these skies than a vault overhead. The skies are the source of light, heat, and water from clouds. Most importantly these skies are also the source of information. They provide us information about our place in space and time. In the ancient world, the sky was the only way to tell time. It was also the source of information about direction. It provided information about the coming weather. The skies were envisioned as a higher plane of existence that provided information and the other necessities of life.

NIV : 

Matthew 6:9 This, then, is how you should pray: “ ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name,

NLT : 

Matthew 6:9 Pray like this: Our Father in heaven, may your name be kept holy.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὕτως (adv) "After this manner" is from houtos, which, as an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

οὖν (partic) "Therefore" is from oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore."

προσεύχεσθε (2nd pl pres imperat mp or verb 2nd pl pres/imp ind mp ) "Pray" is from proseuchomai, which means "to offer prayers or vows", "to worship," and "to pray for a thing. It is the combination of two Greek word, pros, meaning "towards" or "by reason of," and euchomai, meaning "to pray to God."

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "You" is from hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

Πάτερ (noun sg masc voc) "Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

ἡμῶν (pron 1st pl masc/fem gen) "Our" is from hemon, which is the plural possessive (genitive) form of the first personal pronoun.

(article sg masc nom) "Which" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".\

τοῖς (article pl masc dat)   Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, withThout a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --" is from ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate."

οὐρανοῖς (noun pl masc dat) "Heaven" is the Greek ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate."

Ἁγιασθήτω {ἁγίζω}(3rd sg aor imperat pass) "Hallowed be" is from is hagiazo, which means "to separate from profane things and dedicate to God", "to dedicate people to God", "to purify," and "to cleanse externally or internally." This may be a special form of hagizo which means "to hallow", "to dedicate," and "to make sacred," commonly by burning a sacrifice.

τὸ (article sg neut nom "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ὄνομά (noun sg neut nom) "Name" is from onoma, which means "name", "fame", "a name and nothing else [as opposed to a real person]", "a phrase", "an expression", "a technical term", "a word," and, in expressions indicating doubt, "a false name", "a pretense," or "a pretext".

σου, (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

KJV Analysis: 

After this manner -- The Greek word translated as 'After this manner" can also mean "therefore." Here, the same word could serve both purposes: offering the "therefore" and the "in this manner" ideas in one convenient package.

therefore -- While Christ might have repeated the concept "therefore" with a different Greek word here, it is also possible that the next Greek word was used to mean "certainly" or "really."

pray -- The verb "pray" is in a form that could be a command or a simple statement. The verb is plural, which is a change from the previous verb ("ask") at the end of the last verse, Mat 6:8, which was singular. In this speech, we see Jesus switching The verb is in a form where the subject acts on themselves or for their own benefit, so "pray for yourselves" or "you pray for yourselves".

ye: - This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

missing "by/for yourself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "pray by yourself."

Our -- Translated the "our" as "of ours" to better represent its form in Greek. In Greek, the possessive pronoun can come before or after the word it modifies. Christ usually chooses to put it afterward and translation into English can reflect this.

Father - "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

which -- The word translated as "which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). 

art -- (IW)There is no verb here to translate as "art". 

in -- The word translated as "in" can also be translated as "among" or "surrounded by."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

heaven, --(WN) The Greek word translated as "heaven" means "sky". In Greek, it also had the sense of the home of the gods, but not in the sense that we use "heaven" to mean the place of the afterlife. This was also not the traditional idea in the Jewish faith. The word is plural. So it is, "in the skies". Jesus uses this word more in the sense of "the universe" meaning the creation outside of the planet on which we live.  It is also a metaphor for the highest spiritual things. The use of the plural is especially interesting. See this article for more perspective on the word and how Jesus uses this word.

Hallowed --  The Greek verb translated as "hallowed be" means "to dedicate to God". "to purify", and "to sanctify" usually by burning an offering. In this sense, this can mean holy or sacred, but it also means accursed. Another way to think about this word is that it describes something set apart only for God. It is a passive form, so "be sanctified". It is in a form that commands that something happen, which is usually translated with "let" in English as in, "let it be sanctified" but most English speakers use the verb "must" to capture this idea, so "it must be purified".  The concept of sanctifying or purifying something is also attached to both washing and sacrifice.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

thy -- The form of the "thy" pronoun is possessive. Jesus uses it in his "the name of yours" or "that name of yours" since the article "the" in Greek is a form of the word "this" or "that". It appears after the name.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

name. -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." In relationship to any organization, from a family to a state, Jesus uses it to refer to the authority of the leader, the head of the family or the the state.  In places in John, such as John 17:6, Christ describes himself as "manifesting" God's name. He also describes himself as "keeping" his followers in God's name, John 17:12. In both cases, the idea is that he is acting in the name of the leader.

KJV Translation Issues: 

5
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "art" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

This, -  (WF) The Greek word translated as 'this" means "this" as an adjective, but here it is in the form of an adverb.  can also mean "therefore." Here, the same word could serve both purposes: offering the "therefore" and the "in this manner" ideas in one convenient package.

then -- While Jesus might have repeated the concept "therefore" and "then" with a different Greek word here, it is also possible that the next Greek word was used to mean "certainly" or "really."

is how -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "is how" in the Greek source.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

should -- (WF) This indicates that the following verb is a subjunctive but it isn't that form.

pray -- The verb "pray" is in a form that could be a command or a simple statement. The verb is plural, which is a change from the previous verb ("ask") at the end of the last verse, Mat 6:8, which was singular. In this speech, we see Jesus switching The verb is in a form where the subject acts on themselves or for their own benefit, so "pray for yourselves" or "you pray for yourselves".

missing "by/for yourself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "pray by yourself."

Our -- Translated the "our" as "of ours" to better represent its form in Greek. In Greek, the possessive pronoun can come before or after the word it modifies. Christ usually chooses to put it afterward and translation into English can reflect this.

Father - "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

untranslated "the one"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the  one" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those").

in -- The word translated as "in" can also be translated as "among" or "surrounded by."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

heaven, --(WN) The Greek word translated as "heaven" means "sky". In Greek, it also had the sense of the home of the gods, but not in the sense that we use "heaven" to mean the place of the afterlife. This was also not the traditional idea in the Jewish faith. The word is plural. So it is, "in the skies". Jesus uses this word more in the sense of "the universe" meaning the creation outside of the planet on which we live.  It is also a metaphor for the highest spiritual things. The use of the plural is especially interesting. See this article for more perspective on the word and how Jesus uses this word.

Hallowed --  The Greek verb translated as "hallowed be" means "to dedicate to God". "to purify", and "to sanctify" usually by burning an offering. In this sense, this can mean holy or sacred, but it also means accursed. Another way to think about this word is that it describes something set apart only for God. It is a passive form, so "be sanctified". It is in a form that commands that something happen, which is usually translated with "let" in English as in, "let it be sanctified" but most English speakers use the verb "must" to capture this idea, so "it must be purified".  The concept of sanctifying or purifying something is also attached to both washing and sacrifice.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

your -- The form of the "your" pronoun is possessive. Jesus uses it in his "the name of yours" or "that name of yours" since the article "the" in Greek is a form of the word "this" or "that". It appears after the name.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

name. -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." In relationship to any organization, from a family to a state, Jesus uses it to refer to the authority of the leader, the head of the family or the the state.  In places in John, such as John 17:6, Christ describes himself as "manifesting" God's name. He also describes himself as "keeping" his followers in God's name, John 17:12. In both cases, the idea is that he is acting in the name of the leader.

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  •  
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "this" indicates an adjective but the form is an adverb, "in this manner."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "is how" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "should" indicates an subjunctive verb form, but the verb is not subjunctive.
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

Pray  -- The verb "pray" is in a form that could be a command or a simple statement. The verb is plural, which is a change from the previous verb ("ask") at the end of the last verse, Mat 6:8, which was singular. In this speech, we see Jesus switching The verb is in a form where the subject acts on themselves or for their own benefit, so "pray for yourselves" or "you pray for yourselves".

missing "by/for yourself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "pray by yourself."

like this:  - The Greek word translated as 'like this" can also means "therefore" and the "in this manner."

untranslated "therefore"-- (MW) The untranslated word t "therefore" and "then" with a different Greek word here, it is also possible that the next Greek word was used to mean "certainly" or "really."

Our -- Translated the "our" as "of ours" to better represent its form in Greek. In Greek, the possessive pronoun can come before or after the word it modifies. Christ usually chooses to put it afterward and translation into English can reflect this.

Father - "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

untranslated "the one"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the  one" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those").

in -- The word translated as "in" can also be translated as "among" or "surrounded by."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

heaven, --(WN) The Greek word translated as "heaven" means "sky". In Greek, it also had the sense of the home of the gods, but not in the sense that we use "heaven" to mean the place of the afterlife. This was also not the traditional idea in the Jewish faith. The word is plural. So it is, "in the skies". Jesus uses this word more in the sense of "the universe" meaning the creation outside of the planet on which we live.  It is also a metaphor for the highest spiritual things. The use of the plural is especially interesting. See this article for more perspective on the word and how Jesus uses this word.

may -- (WF) This indicates that the following verb is a subjunctive but it isn't that form.

your -- The form of the "your" pronoun is possessive. Jesus uses it in his "the name of yours" or "that name of yours" since the article "the" in Greek is a form of the word "this" or "that". It appears after the name.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

name. -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." In relationship to any organization, from a family to a state, Jesus uses it to refer to the authority of the leader, the head of the family or the the state.  In places in John, such as John 17:6, Christ describes himself as "manifesting" God's name. He also describes himself as "keeping" his followers in God's name, John 17:12. In both cases, the idea is that he is acting in the name of the leader.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

kept -- (WW) The sense of the following verb is "to make holy"  not "to keep holy."

holy. --   This s not an adjective but a verb. Thee Greek verb translated as "holy"means "to dedicate to God". "to purify", and "to sanctify" usually by burning an offering. In this sense, this can mean holy or sacred, but it also means accursed. Another way to think about this word is that it describes something set apart only for God. It is a passive form, so "be sanctified". It is in a form that commands that something happen, which is usually translated with "let" in English as in, "let it be sanctified" but most English speakers use the verb "must" to capture this idea, so "it must be purified".  The concept of sanctifying or purifying something is also attached to both washing and sacrifice.

NLT Translation Issues: 

8
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "therefore" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "may" indicates an subjunctive verb form, but the verb is not subjunctive.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "kept" doesn't exist in the source.

The Spoken Version: 

“In this way, then, you pray for yourselves,” he announced in a rich baritone that the crowd had not heard before. “All of you!”
He looked to the sky and spread his arms.
“Father of ours—the one in the skies,
“It must be made sacred—that name of Yours.

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Feb 11 2020