John 11:25 I am the resurrection,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I am the awakening and the existence. The one putting his trust in me, even though he might have died will exist. >

KJV : 

Jhn 11:25 I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live:

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

While the Greek word translated as "resurrection" is understood that way today, during Christ's time, it would have meant simply "a rising up" or "awakening." It was used to indicate someone standing up especially when awakening from sleep.

Many Greek words are translated as "live" and "to live." This is the word that is use in the phrase "perpetual life," but it isn't the word used in the phrase, "lay down his life for his friends." Christ seem to used this word to generally mean "existence."

The Greek word translated as "believe" primarily means trusting in someone's character and their words.

The verb translated as "were dead" means "to die." It is in the aorist tense, indicating an action that takes place at a specific point in time.

The verb translated as "shall live" is the verb form of the word translated as "life."

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἐγώ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

εἰμι 1st pres ind act) "Am" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ἀνάστασις "The resurrection" is from anastasis, which means, "a standing up", "removal", "a rising up", "a setting up," and "rising from a seat." It is the noun form of anistêmi, which means "to make stand up", "to raise", "to wake up", "to build up", "to restore", "to rouse to action", "to stir up," and "to make people rise."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ζωή: "The life" is from zôê (zoe), which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

πιστεύων (part sg pres act masc nom) "He that believeth" is from pisteuô (pisteuo), which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person", "to believe in someone's words", "to comply", "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing."

εἰς "In" is from eis (eis), which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

ἐμὲ "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

κἂν "Though" is from kan, which means "and if", "even if," and "although." It is a conjunction of kai an. Kai is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." An, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

ἀποθάνῃ (3rd sg aor subj act) "He were dead" is from apothnesko, which means "to die" and "to die off."

ζήσεται, (3rd sg fut ind mid) "Yet he shall live" is from zaô (zao), which means "to live", "the living," and "to be alive." It is a metaphor for "to be full of life", "to be strong," and "to be fresh."