John 14:13 And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

At the Last Supper, Jesus describes trust to the Apostles.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And whatever when you ask [for it] in this name of mind, this I might produce [it] in order that the Father is recognized in the son.

My Takeaway: 

Recognizing Jesus is more than just praising him.

KJV : 

John 14:13 And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.

NIV : 

John 14:13 And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son.

What is Lost in Translation: 

The first part is not quite the promise that it sounds like. The "ask" here specifically means asking for something, not asking a question. The verb could mean "I will do," as translated, but it might be a subjunctive form, not the future tense, "I might do." This makes it a possibility, not a promise or prediction of the future. The "in the name of" phrase is the most common form of this statement, discussed in detail in this article.

The primary meaning of the word translated as "glorified" is  "to think" or "imagine," but Jesus uses it to mean "recognize" both in the sense of matching a mental picture and in honoring someone. It also has the sense of "promoting" someone's reputation.  See this article. t describes what human's suppose. It comes to its meaning of "magnify" by our tendency to imagine things as bigger than the are. However, the meaning here is somewhat opposite of that tendency. We must imagine here, what we cannot see, the real glory of God.

As Jesus has pointed out in the last several verses, the presence of God is seen in actions and works, the ability to do and say things that no one else can.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

Here, Jesus becomes like Prometheus, bringing fire from the gods, but unlike Prometheus, he isn't punished for this. Instead, the Father is recognized in him. People can imagine the nature of the Divine by seeing Jesus and in seeing the works that his followers do.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ὅτι   [90 verses](pron sg neut nom/acc) "Whatsoever" is hostis, which means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

ἂν [162 verses](conj) Untranslated is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) and an (might), which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. This is how we use the word "when."

αἰτήσητε [28 verses](verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Ask" is from aiteo, which means "to ask for," "to demand," "to beg of," "to postulate or assume [in logic]," "to claim," and "to ask for one's own use." In passive, "to be asked" and "to have a thing begged from one."

ἐν [413 verses](prep) "In" is en, which means, with a dative object, "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," "during,"  and "with." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." Referring to time, it means. "in the course of" or "during." 

τῷ [821 verses](article sg neut dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -

ὀνόματί [47 verses](noun sg neut dat) "Name" is onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative.

μου [239 verses](adj sg masc gen) "My" is from mou (emou), which means "me," and "mine." As a genitive object means movement away from something or a position away from something else.

τοῦτο [93 verses](adj sg neut nom/acc) "That" is touto, which means "from here," "from there," "this [thing] there," or "that [person] here."

ποιήσω,, [168 verses](verb 1st sg fut ind act or verb 1st sg aor subj act) "Will I do" is poieo, which means "to make," "to produce," "to create," "to bring into existence," "to bring about," "to cause," "to perform," "to render," "to consider," "to prepare," "to make ready," and "to do." The accusative object is what is made. Double accusative is to do something to someone. When it has a genitive object, it means "made from." When it doesn't have an object, the verb is translated as  "perform" or simply "do." When used with an accusative infinitive, it means to "cause" or "bring about." A dative object means "made with."

ἵνα [134 verses](adv/conj) "That" is hina, which means "in that place," "there," "where," "when,"  but when beginning a phrase "that," "in order that," "when," and "because."

δοξασθῇ [18 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "Honour" is doxazo, which primarily means "to think", "to expect", "to imagine," or "to suppose." Secondarily, it means "to magnify" or "to extol," which is where we get the "glorify" used most often in NT translation. The English term "to recognize" carries the same sense of both seeing a person in the mind and honoring them. 

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πατὴρ [191 verses](noun sg masc nom) "The Father" is pater, which means "father," "grandfather," "author," "parent," and "forefathers."

ἐν [413 verses](prep) "In" is en, which means, with a dative object, "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," "during,"  and "with." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." Referring to time, it means. "in the course of" or "during." 

τῷ [821 verses](article sg masc dat)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

υἱῷ: [158 verses](noun sg masc dat) "The Son" is huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant.

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

whatsoever -- "Whatsoever" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

missing "when"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "when" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is how we use the word "when."

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates or a verb that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

ask -- The Greek word translated as "asketh" means "ask" but has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim." It means to beg or even to demand something from someone else.

in-- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.  With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

name, -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as it does in English, but it doesn't mean the things themselves, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." See this article for more.

that -- The word translated as "that" means "from here" "from there" or "this/that thing/person here/there." It usually comes after the noun, emphasizing it, with the sense of "this one."

will --  This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. However, the form could also be a subjunctive, an action that "might" or "should" happen.  Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

do,   -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. When it means It describes a productive action.  In English, "do" is also frequently a helper verb. This Greek word is not used as broadly.

that -- The word translated as "that" is a conjunction that starts a subordinate clause  "that," "in order that" or "because."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers." It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

may -- This helping verb "may" indicates that the verb indicates a possibility, the subjunctive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

glorified -- The Greek term translated as "glorify" is a word that primarily means "to imagine" and "to expect." It also means "to honor" in a sense. However, the word that it comes closest to in English is "to recognize" since that word captures both the mental "expectation" and "praising" sense of the word. The verb form also has the sense of spreading someone's good reputation, so "publicized and "proclaimed" also work.  More about this word in this article.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.  With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Son. -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "children." It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

KJV Translation Issues: 

2
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "when" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "name" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense.  However, the form could also be a subjunctive, an action that "might" or "should" happen.Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

do,   -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. When it means It describes a productive action.  In English, "do" is also frequently a helper verb. This Greek word is not used as broadly.

missing "this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "that one" means "from here" "from there" or "this/that thing/person here/there." It usually comes after the noun, emphasizing it, with the sense of "this one."

whatsoever -- "Whatsoever" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

missing "when"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "when" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is how we use the word "when."

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

missing "might"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "might" indicates a verb that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. This wouldn't be needed if the "when" was used because it would be assumed.

ask -- The Greek word translated as "asketh" means "ask" but has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim." It means to beg or even to demand something from someone else.

in-- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.  With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

name, -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as it does in English, but it doesn't mean the things themselves, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." See this article for more.

so that-- The word translated as "that" is a conjunction that starts a subordinate clause  "that," "in order that" or "because."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers." It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

may -- This helping verb "may" indicates that the verb indicates a possibility, the subjunctive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

glorified -- The Greek term translated as "glorify" is a word that primarily means "to imagine" and "to expect." It also means "to honor" in a sense. However, the word that it comes closest to in English is "to recognize" since that word captures both the mental "expectation" and "praising" sense of the word. The verb form also has the sense of spreading someone's good reputation, so "publicized and "proclaimed" also work.  More about this word in this article.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.  With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Son. -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "children." It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

NIV Translation Issues: 

3
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "this" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "when" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "name" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Oct 1 2022