John 14:18 I will not leave you comfortless:

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

At the Last Supper, Jesus gives his final message to the apostles.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

No, I won't let you go orphaned. I show up before you.

My Takeaway: 

It is hard to know when Jesus is coming and going.

KJV : 

John 14:18 I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.

NIV : 

John 14:18 I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you.

What is Lost in Translation: 

The word translated as "come" is not in the future tense. It is in the present tense. The verb  can mean either coming or going but it is best understood without a sense of direction. The primary meaning of the verb is "start." The direction of movement is further confused by the preposition in the phrase,"to you."  That can mean "toward" or "from", which doesn't help here at all. However, it also means "before" as a position (not of time).

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐκ [269 verses](partic) "Not" is ou , the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences.  The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἀφήσω [73 verses](verb 1st sg fut ind act) "Leave" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall," "to send away," "give up," "hand over," "to let loose," "to get rid of," "to leave alone," "to pass by," "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

ὑμᾶς [210 verses](pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural objective form of the second-person pronoun, "you."

ὀρφανούς, [1 verse](adj pl masc acc) "Comfortless" is from orphanos, which means "orphaned," "bereft," and "lacking parents."

ἔρχομαι [198 verses](verb 1st sg pres ind mp) "Come" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

πρὸς [92 verses](prep)  "To" is from pros, which means "from (place)," "on the side of," "toward," "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "before (supplication, a judge, a witness)," "near" a time, "for" the moment, "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable," "in comparison with," "becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before."  It also means "dependent upon."

ὑμᾶς [210 verses](pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural objective form of the second-person pronoun, "you."

KJV Analysis: 

I --This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. 

leave -- The word translated as "leave" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." It has the sense of leaving something alone and letting it drop. This same word is usually translated as "leave," "forgive," "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. See this article for more.

you -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition.

comfortless: -- "Comfortless" is from  a Greek adjective that is our source for the word "orphan." It means "orphaned," "bereft," and "lacking parents." Jesus only uses this word in this verse.

I --This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will  -- (WT) This helping verb "will" indicates the future tense, but the verb is not the future.

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

to -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

you -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition. An accusative object of a preposition indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

KJV Translation Issues: 

1
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" indicates the future tense, but that is not the tense here.

NIV Analysis: 

I --This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. 

leave -- The word translated as "leave" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." It has the sense of leaving something alone and letting it drop. This same word is usually translated as "leave," "forgive," "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. See this article for more.

you -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition.

as -- (IW) There is nothing in the Greek that can be translated as "as" in the Greek source.

orphans; --  (WF) "Orphans" is from  a Greek adjective that is our source for the word "orphan." It means "orphaned," "bereft," and "lacking parents." Jesus only uses this word in this verse. This is not a noun but an adjective

I --This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will  -- (WT) This helping verb "will" indicates the future tense, but the verb is not the future.

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

to -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

you -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition. An accusative object of a preposition indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

NIV Translation Issues: 

3
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "as" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "orphans" is not a noun but an adjective, "orphaned."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" indicates the future tense, but that is not the tense here.

Front Page Date: 

Oct 6 2022