John 14:21 He that has my commandments,

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

At the Last Supper, Jesus gives his final message to the apostles.

KJV : 

John 14:21 He that has my commandments, and keeps them, he it is that loves me: and he that loves me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him.

Literal Verse: 

The one having these commands of mine and taking care of them, that person there is the one caring for me. The one, then, caring for me, will be cared for by that Father of mine. And I myself will care for him and will explain myself to him.

What is Lost in Translation: 

The verb translated as "manifest" and "show" is only used by Jesus here. While it means "show forth," it also means "show clearly," make plain," and from that sense "explain." These "explain" myself seems to make more sense given that Jesus is talking to his Apostles who can see him physically but who often need to ask him to explain what he means.

The verb translated as "have" also means "to keep" as in holding onto something. The verb translated as "keep," however, means "keeping" in the sense of taking care of something. This is the only verse in which these two verbs are used together despite the Greek verb translated as "have" is one of the most common verbs.

Many of the subjects in this verse are the participle forms of verbs, used as nouns, not active verbs. These include "has," "keep," and several of the "loves." Jesus  said "the one having," "the one keeping," and "the one loving" and so on. By using participles, Jesus is defining people by what they do, by their actions. The translators of the Bible do not like Jesus's frequent use of participles changes them to active verbs by making the verbs dependent clauses, "he that has" or "whoever has."

The word repeatedly translated as "love" in this verse expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus, however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another Greek verb, also translated as "love," is used for affectionate friendships that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating this verb as "cares for" seems to work best. This works especially well in this verse because the word translated as "keeps" also means "takes care of." This word for "love" is used three times with the verb translated as "keep," which is interesting because neither word is that common.   See this article on love for more information.

My Takeaway: 

We must hold onto and guard Jesus's words if we want him to explain them to us.

Greek : 

Wordplay: 

The meaning of the verb translated as  "keeps" as "take care of" plays agains the meaning of the verb translated as "love" as "care for." The one taking care of these commands of mine cares for me.
 

Greek Vocabulary: 

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "He" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἔχων [181 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) "Has" is echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to have due to one," "to maintain," "to hold fast," "to hold in," "to bear," "to carry," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." In aorist, it can mean "acquire," or "get." The main sense when it has an object is "to have" or "to hold." It can also mean "to without" or "keep back" a thing. 

τὰς [821 verses](article pl fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -

ἐντολάς [23 verses](noun pl fem acc) "Commandments" is entole which means "injunction," "order," and "command."

μου [239 verses](adj sg masc gen) "Me" is from mou (emou), which means "me," and "mine." As a genitive object means movement away from something or a position away from something else.

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

 τηρῶν [17 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) "Keeps" is tereo, which means "to watch over," "to guard," "to take care of," "to give heed to," "to keep," "to test by observation or trial," and "to observe." 

αὐτὰς [720 verses](adj pl fem acc) "Them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." In the plural, "they," "them," and "their." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

ἐκεῖνός [107 verses](adj sg masc nom) "That" is ekeinos, which means "the person there," "that person," "that thing," and, in the form of an adverb, "in that case," "in that way," "at that place," and "in that manner." -

ἐστίν.[614 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen,"  and "is possible." With the genitive object, the sense is "belongs to." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "That" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἀγαπῶν [32 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) "Loves" is agapao, which means "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," "to caress," "to prize," "to desire," "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with."  This love is more associated with affection in relationships where we are obligated. Jesus uses another word. Jesus uses another word, phileô, which means "to love," "to like," "to be fond of doing," and "to show affection" to express "love" in the sense of like and dislike.He never uses the word eros, which describes romantic, sexual love.

με: [49 verses](pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which is the objective first-person, objective, singular pronoun that means  "me."

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "He" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). With the Greek word for "if" the sense is "if...than."

ἀγαπῶν  [32 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) "Loves" is agapao, which means "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," "to caress," "to prize," "to desire," "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with."  This love is more associated with affection in relationships where we are obligated. Jesus uses another word. Jesus uses another word, phileô, which means "to love," "to like," "to be fond of doing," and "to show affection" to express "love" in the sense of like and dislike.He never uses the word eros, which describes romantic, sexual love.

με [49 verses](pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which is the objective first-person, objective, singular pronoun that means  "me."-

ἀγαπηθήσεται [32 verses](3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be loved" is agapao, which means "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," "to caress," "to prize," "to desire," "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with."  This love is more associated with affection in relationships where we are obligated. Jesus uses another word. Jesus uses another word, phileô, which means "to love," "to like," "to be fond of doing," and "to show affection" to express "love" in the sense of like and dislike.He never uses the word eros, which describes romantic, sexual love.

ὑπὸ [29 verses](prep) "Of" is hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)," "down under," under, beneath," "by" in the sense of a cause or agency, "under," or "with," "under the cover or protection of," "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate," "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection," "control," "dependence," of Time, "in the course of," "during," "about," as an adverb, "under," "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by," "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause).

τοῦ [821 verses](article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -

πατρός [191 verses](noun sg masc gen) "The Father" is pater, which means "father," "grandfather," "author," "parent," and "forefathers."

μου [239 verses](adj sg masc gen) "Me" is from mou (emou), which means "me," and "mine." As a genitive object means movement away from something or a position away from something else

κἀγὼ [31 verses](pron 1st sg masc nom ) "And...I" is kago, a contraction of kai-ego. "And" is kai-, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." "I" is -ego, which is the first-person singular pronoun meaning "I." It also means "I at least," "for my part," "indeed," and "for myself." --

ἀγαπήσω [32 verses](verb 1st sg fut ind act) "Will love" is agapao, which means "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," "to caress," "to prize," "to desire," "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with."  This love is more associated with affection in relationships where we are obligated. Jesus uses another word. Jesus uses another word, phileô, which means "to love," "to like," "to be fond of doing," and "to show affection" to express "love" in the sense of like and dislike.He never uses the word eros, which describes romantic, sexual love.

αὐτὸν [720 verses](adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." In the plural, "they," "them," and "their." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἐμφανίσω [1 verse](verb 1st sg fut ind act)  "Manifest" is from emphanizō, which means "show forth", "manifest", "exhibit", "to make clear", "to make plain", "to declare", "to explain,"

αὐτῷ [720 verses](adj sg masc dat) "To him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." In the plural, "they," "them," and "their." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

ἐμαυτόν. [15 verses] (pron sg masc acc)  "Myself" is emautou, which means "of me," and "of myself".

KJV Analysis: 

He -- (CW) The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

has -- (WF) The word translated as "has" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "keep close," "hold in," "have means to do,"  "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses. This is not an active verb but a participle, "the one having."

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine." 

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

commandments, -- The word translated as "commandments" has the sense of a direct "order" or "command" given by someone as opposed to a body of law or tradition in society. Jesus uses it to refer to the written Law, his lessons, and the commands given by someone in authority.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

keeps - (WF) The word translated as "keep" means "to watch over," "to guard," "to take care of," "to give heed to," "to keep," "to test by observation or trial," and "to observe." Jesus uses this word seventeen times, almost always with the idea of "keeping" in one commandment or another. "Keep" works best because it combines the idea of "guarding" and "observing." However,  the use of this verb with to "care for" verb translated as "love" emphasizes this verb's meaning as "tales care of." This is not an active verb but a participle, "keeping."

them, -- The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

he - (CW) The word translated as "he" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." Used a pronoun, the sense is "that one there" or "this one here."

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

that -- The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. It could also be the demonstrative pronoun, except that precedes a participle.

loves -- (WF) The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information. This is not an active verb but a participle, "caring."

me: -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

and -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

he  -- The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

loves - (WF) The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information. This is not an active verb but a participle, "caring."

me: -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

loved -- The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information.

of -- (CW) The word translated as "of" primarily means "by," "under," or "with." Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion. It is not the possessive "of."

my .-- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine." 

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers." It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

and I -- This is from a contraction of the conjunction "and" and the subject pronoun "I". Since the verb is already in the first person, that addition of the pronoun is like saying "and I myself," emphasizing the first- person speaker.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subjective pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

love-- The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information.

him, -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

manifest   - "Manifest" is a Greek verb that Jesus only uses here that means "show forth", "manifest", "exhibit", "to make clear", "to make plain", "to declare", "to explain,"

myself -- The Greek reflexive pronoun is translated as "myself." It is used primarily as the object of a preposition but here it is the object of the verb.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

him. -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. 

KJV Translation Issues: 

13
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "he" is not the common word usually translated as "but."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "has" is not an active verb but a participle, "having."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "commandments" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "keeps" is not an active verb but a participle, "keeping."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "he" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "loves" is not an active verb but a participle, "caring for."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" should be something more like "but."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "loves" is not an active verb but a participle, "caring for."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "of" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "father" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

NIV : 

John 14:21Whoever has my commands and keeps them is the one who loves me. The one who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I too will love them and show myself to them.”

NIV Analysis: 

Whoever -- (CW) The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

has -- (WF) The word translated as "has" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "keep close," "hold in," "have means to do,"  "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses. This is not an active verb but a participle, "the one having."

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine." 

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

commandments, -- The word translated as "commandments" has the sense of a direct "order" or "command" given by someone as opposed to a body of law or tradition in society. Jesus uses it to refer to the written Law, his lessons, and the commands given by someone in authority.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

keeps - (WF) The word translated as "keep" means "to watch over," "to guard," "to take care of," "to give heed to," "to keep," "to test by observation or trial," and "to observe." Jesus uses this word seventeen times, almost always with the idea of "keeping" in one commandment or another. "Keep" works best because it combines the idea of "guarding" and "observing." However,  the use of this verb with to "care for" verb translated as "love" emphasizes this verb's meaning as "tales care of." This is not an active verb but a participle, "keeping."

them, -- The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

missing "the one there"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "the one there" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." Used a pronoun, the sense is "that one there" or "this one here."

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

the one -- The word translated as "the one" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. It could also be the demonstrative pronoun, except that precedes a participle.

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

loves -- (WF) The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information. This is not an active verb but a participle, "caring."

me: -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

missing "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "and" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

the one -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

loves - (WF) The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information. This is not an active verb but a participle, "caring."

me: -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

loved -- The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information.

by -- The word translated as "of" primarily means "by," "under," or "with." Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion. It is not the possessive "of."

my .-- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine." 

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers." It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father.

and I -- This is from a contraction of the conjunction "and" and the subject pronoun "I". Since the verb is already in the first person, that addition of the pronoun is like saying "and I myself," emphasizing the first- person speaker.

too -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "to" in the Greek source.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subjective pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

love-- The word translated as "love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of," "to greet with affection," "to persuade," and "to be contented with." Jesus however, applies it to relationships where we have a duty to care for others: family, God, etc. Another word, also translated as "love," is used to for relationships of affectionate friendship that are more voluntary. To distinguish this word, translating it as "cares for" seems to work best. See this article on love for more information.

them , --  (WN) The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. This word is singular, not plural.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

show - "Show" is a Greek verb that Jesus only uses here that means "show forth", "manifest", "exhibit", "to make clear", "to make plain", "to declare", "to explain,"

myself -- The Greek reflexive pronoun is translated as "myself." It is used primarily as the object of a preposition but here it is the object of the verb.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

them . -- (WN) The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. 

NIV Translation Issues: 

15
  1. CW - Confusing Word -- The "whoever" is not the common word usually translated as "whoever."
  2. WF - Wrong Form -  The "has" is not an active verb but a participle, "having."
  3. MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "commandments" is not shown in the English translation.
  4. WF - Wrong Form -  The "keeps" is not an active verb but a participle, "keeping."
  5. MW - Missing Word -- The word "this one there" is not shown in the English translation.
  6. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" doesn't exist in the source.
  7. WF - Wrong Form -  The "loves" is not an active verb but a participle, "caring for."
  8. MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  9. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" doesn't exist in the source.
  10. WF - Wrong Form -  The "loves" is not an active verb but a participle, "caring for."
  11. MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "father" is not shown in the English translation.
  12. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "too" doesn't exist in the source.
  13. MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  14. .WN  - Wrong Number- The word "them" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.
  15. .WN  - Wrong Number- The word "to  them" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.

Related Verses: 

Front Page Date: 

Oct 9 2022