John 16:13 Howbeit when he,

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

After the Last Supper, after Jesus says there are things the Apostles don't have the power to understand right now.

KJV : 

John 16:13 Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will show you things to come.

Literal Verse: 

When that one there, shows up then the spirit of the truth will guide you towards the whole truth. Because he will not relay out of himself. Instead, as much as he hears he will relay, and he will transmit to you the things starting .

What is Lost in Translation: 

Again, the word for "spirit" means "the breath" in the sense of the breath of life. Here, it is phrased as "the breath of the truth. "Truth" in Greek means "not hidden." Thus, "unveiling" and "revelation" capture some of that feeling. The phrase translated as "into all truth," means "toward the whole truth." The preposition means "into a place, but "towards" describing a relationship. The word translated as "speak" means "relay," that is to "pass on" information from a source. The idea of relaying "out of himself" is something of a contradiction, a humorous one.  The Greek word translated as "to come" doesn't have the same sense of the future that the English words do. The primary meaning of the verb is "to start" so its sense is "the things starting."
 

My Takeaway: 

The spirit tells us what it starting, not how it ends.

Greek : 

Original Word Order: 

When, however, it shows up, that one there. The spirit of the truth will guide you towards the truth, all of it. No, consequently, he will not relay from himself. Instead, as much as he hears he will relay and the things starting for you he will transmit.

Wordplay: 

 The verb in the first phrase translated as "to come" is the same verb participle translated as "things to come" in the final phrase." 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὅταν [70 verses](adv/conj) "When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)."

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be an explanation of indirect cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). In an  "if" (εἰ ) clause or temporal "when" (ὅταν) clause the sense is "if/when... then." In a series begun by men, its means "on the other hand."

ἔλθῃ [198 verses](3rd sg aor subj act) "Is come" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ἐκεῖνος [107 verses](adj sg masc nom) "That" is ekeinos, which means "the person there," "that person," "that thing," and, in the form of an adverb, "in that case," "in that way," "at that place," and "in that manner."

τὸ [821 verses](article sg neut nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

πνεῦμα [40 verses](noun sg neut nom) "Spirit" is pneuma, which means "blast," "wind," "breath," "the breath of life," "divine inspiration," "a spiritual or immaterial being," and "the spirit" of a man.

τῆς [821 verses](article sg fem gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -

ἀληθείας, [19 verses] (noun sg fem gen) "Truth" is aletheia, which means literally "the state of not being hidden," "truth," and "reality." It was also applied to "real events" and "the realization of a dream." Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.  The Greek concept of truth was that it was defined by its opposition to that which is concealed. This goes back to a daughter of Zeus, Aletheia, whose opposites were Dolos (Trickery), Apate (Deception) and the Pseudologoi (Lies).

ὁδηγήσει [3 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "He will guide"is the verb hodêgeô, which means "to lead one upon his way," and "to guide." These concepts were also used for those who helped those ignorant of a given area. 

ὑμᾶς [210 verses](pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural objective form of the second-person pronoun, "you."

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν [821 verses](article sg fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -

ἀλήθειαν [19 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Truth" is aletheia, which means literally "the state of not being hidden," "truth," and "reality." It was also applied to "real events" and "the realization of a dream." Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.  The Greek concept of truth was that it was defined by its opposition to that which is concealed. This goes back to a daughter of Zeus, Aletheia, whose opposites were Dolos (Trickery), Apate (Deception) and the Pseudologoi (Lies).

πᾶσαν, [212 verses](adj sg fem acc) "All" is pas, which means "all," "the whole," "every," "anyone," "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way," "on every side," "in every way," and "altogether."

οὐ [269 verses](partic) "Not" is ou , the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences.  The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

γὰρ [205 verses](partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

λαλήσει [49 verses](3rd sg fut ind act) "He shall...speak" is laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle," "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech. However, Jesus seems to use in in the sense of "relaying" information gained from another. 

ἀφ᾽ [190 verses]​(prep) "From" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. It also means the instrument "by" which a thing is done.  Usually takes the genitive object.

ἑαυτοῦ,  [75 verses](adj sg neut/masc gen) "Himself" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself," "herself," "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is not the common pronoun meaning simply "he," "she," "them," etc.

ἀλλ᾽ [154 verses](conj) "But" is alla, which means "instead," "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay."

ὅσα [28 verses](adj sg masc gen) "Whatsoever" is hosos, which means "as many," "as much as," "as great as," "as far as," and "only so far as."

ἀκούει [95 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "He shall hear" is akouo,  which means "hear of," "hear tell of," "what one actually hears," "know by hearsay," "listen to," "give ear to," "hear and understand," and "understand." The accusative object is the person/thing heard about, while the genitive is the person/thing heard from.  However, two genitives can be used with the sense of "hear of a thing from a person." -

λαλήσει, [49 verses](3rd sg fut ind act) "He shall...speak" is laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle," "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech. However, Jesus seems to use in in the sense of "relaying" information gained from another. 

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

τὰ [821 verses](article pl neut nom/acc)  "Things" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἐρχόμενα [198 verses](part pl pres mp neut nom/acc) "To come" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ὑμῖν [289 verses](pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἀναγγελεῖ [5 verses](3rd sg fut ind act) "Show" is from anaggello, which means "carry tidings of", "report", "tell of," and "proclaim."

KJV Analysis: 

Howbeit -- The Greek word translated as "howbeit" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. When used with a conditional starting a clause, as it is here, the sense is "if/when...then."

when -- The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

he, -- (CW) The word translated as "he" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." Used a pronoun, the sense is "that one there" or "this one here."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Spirit  -- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath," "wind," a "non-material being," and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical." Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

truth, .-- The literal meaning of the Greek word for "truth" is "not hidden," and it means what is real as opposed to how things seem. Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.

is -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source. It was added because the previous verb was translated as active rather than a participle.

come, -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

guide - The word translated as "guide" is the verb form of the noun "leaders" used before. It means "to lead one upon his way," and "to guide." These concepts were also used for those who helped those ignorant of a given area.

you -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition.

into -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "as much as (of measure or limit)," "in regards to" a subject,"up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose or object.

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way," "on every side," and "altogether."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

truth: -- The literal meaning of the Greek word for "truth" is "not hidden," and it means what is real as opposed to how things seem. Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.

for --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause." 

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. 

speak -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "speak" is not the ordinary "to say," "to talk," "to tell," or "to speak" in Greek. This word means "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Jesus uses it to capture the idea of "passing on." "conveying,"  or "relaying" information.  When there isn't an object, "transmit" captures the idea of being a conduit rather than a source of information.

of --- (CW) The word translated as "of" means "from" in both locations and when referring to a source or a cause. It also means the instrument "by" which a thing is done and "away from." It is not the word form  usually translated as "of."

himself; -- "Himself" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself," "herself," and so on. " When used in the possessive, it has the sense of "his own."

but -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "instead" or "rather." It is not the common word usually translated as "but." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, "not this," with a positive one, "instead this."

whatsoever -- (CW) The adjective translated as "whatsoever" means "as great as," "as much as," and similar ideas of comparison. It is not the word that means "what."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- -- (WT) This helping verb "shall" indicates the future tense, but the verb is not the future.

hear, -- "Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.   It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent." The accusative object is the person/thing heard about, while the genitive is the person/thing heard from.  However, two genitives can be used with the sense of "hear of a thing from a person."

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek sourceIW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.

shall -- This helping verb "shall " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

speak: -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "speak" is not the ordinary "to say," "to talk," "to tell," or "to speak" in Greek. This word means "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Jesus uses it to capture the idea of "passing on." "conveying,"  or "relaying" information.  When there isn't an object, "transmit" captures the idea of being a conduit rather than a source of information.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

show - "Show" is a verb that means to "carry back tidings", "to report", "tell," and "proclaim." From the Greek word for "angels" that means "messengers." This is uncommon verb that Jesus only uses five times.

you  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. As the object of a preposition, this form implies no movement, but in a fixed position or events occur at a specified time or while action was being performed.

things -- (MW) The word translated as "things" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. The form is plural neutral so the sense is "the things."

to -- (WF) This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

come. -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

KJV Translation Issues: 

13
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "he" is not the common word usually translated as "he."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "truth" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "truth" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speak" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "of" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "but" is not the common word usually translated as "but."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "whatsoever" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "shall" indicates the future tense, but that is not the tense here.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speak" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "things" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an infinitive but a participle, "showing up."

NIV : 

John 16:13 But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you into all the truth. He will not speak on his own; he will speak only what he hears, and he will tell you what is yet to come.

NIV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. When used with a conditional starting a clause, as it is here, the sense is "if/when...then."

when -- The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

he, -- (CW) The word translated as "he" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." Used a pronoun, the sense is "that one there" or "this one here."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Spirit  -- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath," "wind," a "non-material being," and "blast." Like "spirit" in English, it can also mean "attitude" or "motivation.' It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical." Read more about this word in this article on the holy spirit.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

truth, .-- The literal meaning of the Greek word for "truth" is "not hidden," and it means what is real as opposed to how things seem. Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.

comes, -- The word translated as "comes" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

guide - The word translated as "guide" is the verb form of the noun "leaders" used before. It means "to lead one upon his way," and "to guide." These concepts were also used for those who helped those ignorant of a given area.

you -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition.

into -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "as much as (of measure or limit)," "in regards to" a subject,"up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose or object.

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way," "on every side," and "altogether."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

truth: -- The literal meaning of the Greek word for "truth" is "not hidden," and it means what is real as opposed to how things seem. Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.

missing "for"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause."

He -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. 

speak -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "speak" is not the ordinary "to say," "to talk," "to tell," or "to speak" in Greek. This word means "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Jesus uses it to capture the idea of "passing on." "conveying,"  or "relaying" information.  When there isn't an object, "transmit" captures the idea of being a conduit rather than a source of information.

on --- (CW) The word translated as "on " means "from" in both locations and when referring to a source or a cause. It also means the instrument "by" which a thing is done and "away from." It is not the word form  usually translated as "of."

his own; -- "His own" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself," "herself," and so on. " When used in the possessive, it has the sense of "his own."

missing "instead"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "instead" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "instead" or "rather." It is not the common word usually translated as "but." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, "not this," with a positive one, "instead this."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

speak: -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "speak" is not the ordinary "to say," "to talk," "to tell," or "to speak" in Greek. This word means "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Jesus uses it to capture the idea of "passing on." "conveying,"  or "relaying" information.  When there isn't an object, "transmit" captures the idea of being a conduit rather than a source of information.

only -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "only" in the Greek sourceIW - Inserted Word -- The word "only" doesn't exist in the source.

what -- (CW) The adjective translated as "whatsoever" means "as great as," "as much as," and similar ideas of comparison. It is not the word that means "what."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

hears -- "Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.   It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent." The accusative object is the person/thing heard about, while the genitive is the person/thing heard from.  However, two genitives can be used with the sense of "hear of a thing from a person."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

tell - (CW) "Tell" is a verb that means to "carry back tidings", "to report", "tell," and "proclaim." From the Greek word for "angels" that means "messengers." This is uncommon verb that Jesus only uses five times.It is not the common word usually translated as "tell."

you  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. As the object of a preposition, this form implies no movement, but in a fixed position or events occur at a specified time or while action was being performed.

what -- (CW) The word translated as "things" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

is yet-- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "is yet" in the Greek source. to come.

to -- (WF) This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

come. -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

NIV Translation Issues: 

14
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "he" is not the common word usually translated as "he."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "truth" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "for" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speak" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "on" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "instead" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" indicates the future tense, but that is not the tense here.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speak" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "only" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "what" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "tell" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "what" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  •  IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "is yet" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an infinitive but a participle, "showing up."

Related Verses: 

Unimportant Opinions and Imaginings: 

In the previous verse, Christ also said that they didn't have to power to hear these things now. This power comes through the go-between, the breath of truth. However, as Christ said in John 14:17 , the word doesn't have the power to connect to that spirit because they don't trust in Christ.

As we have also said before, Christ consistently describes this spirit in Greek words that describe a connection, but here this is made even more plain. This spirit does not speak on his own but communicate what is heard.

Again, this verse answers a question about power and how spiritual abilities are acquired. In John 13:36, As Christ describes himself as a path maker, leading where the apostles (and we) cannot yet go. Here he says something similar about learning. The apostles (and we) do not have the power to learn more now, but we will get that power when we connect to the spirit of truth, who will be sent from beside the Father.

Front Page Date: 

Nov 27 2022