John 16:5 But now I go my way to him that sent me;

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

After the Last Supper, after Jesus says the Apostles should remember what he is saying.

KJV : 

John 16:5 But now I go my way to him that sent me; and none of you asks me, Whither go thou?

Literal Verse: 

Now, however, I go away to the one sending me, and none from among you should ask me: Where are you going?

What is Lost in Translation: 

This verse seems meaningless. Jesus tells the Apostles where he is going, then he tells then that none ask where he is going. However, it is actually Jesus teasing the Apostles. He tells them where he is going in a vague way, "to the one sending me." And it should be clear to them that he means back to his father. But some of them seem a little slow so he teases their intelligence, saying "None from among you, should ask me, "Where are you going?" It is the "should ask" that makes this line funny. The "should" comes from the verb's mood, which suggest a possibility.

My Takeaway: 

We shouldn't be as dumb as we are, but sometimes we are.

Greek : 

Greek Vocabulary: 

νῦν [31 verses](adv) "Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now," "at the present moment," "at the present time," "just now," "presently," and "as it is."

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). With the Greek word for "if" the sense is "if...than."

ὑπάγω [47 verses](verb  [47 verses](verb 1st sg pres ind act) "I go" is hypago, which means "to lead under," "to bring under," "to bring a person before judgment," "to lead on by degrees," "to take away from beneath," "to withdraw," "to go away," "to retire," "to draw off," and "off with you."

πρὸς [92 verses](prep)  "To" is from pros, which means "from (place)," "on the side of," "toward," "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "before (supplication, a judge, a witness)," "near" a time, "for" the moment, "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable," "in comparison with," "becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before."  It also means "dependent upon."

τὸν [821 verses](article sg masc acc)  "Him" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

πέμψαντά [39 verses](part sg aor act masc acc) "That sent me" is pempo, which means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort."

με [49 verses](pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which is the objective first-person, objective, singular pronoun that means  "me."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

οὐδεὶς [69 verses](adj sg masc nom) "None" is oudeis which means "no one," "not one," "nothing," "naught," "good for naught," and "no matter."

ἐξ [121 verses] (prep) "Of" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from;" 6) cause, instrument, or means "by."

ὑμῶν [168 verses](pron 2nd pl gen) "Your/you" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." It is either a possessive pronoun or the object of a preposition.

ἐρωτᾷ  [17 verses](verb  2nd sg pres ind/subj act) "Asks" is from erotaowhich means "to ask," "beg," or "to question." 

με [49 verses](pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which is the objective first-person, objective, singular pronoun that means  "me."

Ποῦ [12 verses] (pron or adv) "Wither" is pou, which means as a pronoun "where?", "at what point," and [of manner] "how." As an adverb. it means "somewhere", "anywhere", "doubtless," and "perhaps." The forms are the same.

ὑπάγεις [47 verses](verb 2nd sg pres ind) "Goest thou" is hypago, which means "to lead under," "to bring under," "to bring a person before judgment," "to lead on by degrees," "to take away from beneath," "to withdraw," "to go away," "to retire," "to draw off," and "off with you."

KJV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

now -- The Greek word translated as "now" means "now," "at the present moment,""presently," and "as it is."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

go -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart." is hypago, which means "to lead under," "to bring under," "to bring a person before judgment," "to lead on by degrees," "to take away from beneath," "to withdraw," "to go away," "to retire," "to draw off," and "off with you." -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

my way -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "my way" in the Greek source.

to -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

him -- (CW) The word translated as "him" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

sent -- (WF) "Sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort." This is the second most common word Jesus uses that is translated as "send out," but this one doesn't have the prefix that has the sense of "out." This is not an active verb, but a participle.

me; -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

none -- The Greek adjective translated as "no man" also means "no one," "nothing," and other negative pronouns. It is used by Jesus more like a negative pronoun than an adjective.  However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

of -- (CW) The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." The word has a number of different meanings based upon its context. However, in Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases that are translated into English "of" phrases.

you -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. Here, it is the object of the previous preposition. As an object of a preposition, the genitive indicates movement away or a position away from something.

asks-- The word translated as "ask" means "to ask"  "to beg," or "to question."  It means to "ask about a thing" or "the question a person." This verb has more the sense of asking a question than asking for something.  It could be a declaration of a subjunctive, an action that "might" or "should" happen.

me, -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

Whither -- The word translated as "whither" means as a pronoun "where?", "at what point," and [of manner] "how." As an adverb, it means "somewhere," "anywhere," and "perhaps." Jesus always seems to use it as "where."

go -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart." is hypago, which means "to lead under," "to bring under," "to bring a person before judgment," "to lead on by degrees," "to take away from beneath," "to withdraw," "to go away," "to retire," "to draw off," and "off with you." -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

thou?-- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

KJV Translation Issues: 

5
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "your way" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "him" is not the common pronoun usually translated as "him."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "of" does not capture the word's specific meaning.

NIV : 

John 16:5 but now I am going to him who sent me. None of you asks me, ‘Where are you going?’

NIV Analysis: 

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

now -- The Greek word translated as "now" means "now," "at the present moment,""presently," and "as it is."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

am -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb. It is used here to form the present, progressive tense, which doesn't exist in Greek but which can smooth the flow of English sentences.

going -- "Going" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart." is hypago, which means "to lead under," "to bring under," "to bring a person before judgment," "to lead on by degrees," "to take away from beneath," "to withdraw," "to go away," "to retire," "to draw off," and "off with you." -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

to -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

him -- (CW) The word translated as "him" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who" in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

sent -- (WF) "Sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort." This is the second most common word Jesus uses that is translated as "send out," but this one doesn't have the prefix that has the sense of "out." This is not an active verb, but a participle.

me; -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

missing "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation. "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

none -- The Greek adjective translated as "no man" also means "no one," "nothing," and other negative pronouns. It is used by Jesus more like a negative pronoun than an adjective.  However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

of -- (CW) The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." The word has a number of different meanings based upon its context. However, in Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases that are translated into English "of" phrases.

you -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. Here, it is the object of the previous preposition. As an object of a preposition, the genitive indicates movement away or a position away from something.

asks-- The word translated as "ask" means "to ask"  "to beg," or "to question."  It means to "ask about a thing" or "the question a person." This verb has more the sense of asking a question than asking for something.  It could be a declaration of a subjunctive, an action that "might" or "should" happen.

me, -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement. ‘are you going?’

Where -- The word translated as "where" means as a pronoun "where?", "at what point," and [of manner] "how." As an adverb, it means "somewhere," "anywhere," and "perhaps." Jesus always seems to use it as "where."

are -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb. It is used here to form the present, progressive tense, which doesn't exist in Greek but which can smooth the flow of English sentences.

you-- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

going -- "Going" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart." is hypago, which means "to lead under," "to bring under," "to bring a person before judgment," "to lead on by degrees," "to take away from beneath," "to withdraw," "to go away," "to retire," "to draw off," and "off with you." -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

NIV Translation Issues: 

5
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "him" is not the common pronoun usually translated as "him."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "of" does not capture the word's specific meaning.

Related Verses: 

Front Page Date: 

Nov 19 2022