John 16:7 Nevertheless I tell you the truth;

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

After the Last Supper, after Jesus says the Apostles they are in pain because of what he has told them.

KJV : 

John 16:7 Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you.

Literal Verse: 

Instead, I myself tell you the truth. It brings you together because I myself should depart. Because when I do not depart, the summoned assistant never might show up before you. When, however, I am made to go, I will send him before you.

What is Lost in Translation: 

First, the Greek word for "truth" means literally "not hidden."

The word translated as "it is expedient" primarily means "to collect" or "bring together." One of its secondary meanings is "to confer a benefit." It was used like we use the phrase "getting it together" to mean making an improvement. The humor is the idea that they will get together because he leaves them.

More interesting is the fact that the word translated as "I depart," is a passive verb. Jesus is not saying simply that he "is going" but that he "is being made to go. Also note that the verb used to express the idea of Jesus's "going away" is different than the one translated as "go/depart" at the end of the verse. The first word, going away, also means "depart from life," so "depart works best.

My Takeaway: 

We are given an opportunity to get it together when torn away from those we depend upon.

Greek : 

Original Word Order: 

Instead, I myself the truth tell you. It brings you together because I myself should depart. When, consequently, I don't depart, the summoned assistant might never show up before you. When, however, I am made to go, I will send him before you.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀλλ᾽ [154 verses](conj) "Nevertheless" is alla, which means "instead," "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay."

ἐγὼ [162 verses](pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first-person singular pronoun meaning "I." It also means "I at least," "for my part," "indeed," and for myself.

τὴν [821 verses](article sg fem acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἀλήθειαν [19 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Truth" is aletheia, which means literally "the state of not being hidden," "truth," and "reality." It was also applied to "real events" and "the realization of a dream." Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.  The Greek concept of truth was that it was defined by its opposition to that which is concealed. This goes back to a daughter of Zeus, Aletheia, whose opposites were Dolos (Trickery), Apate (Deception) and the Pseudologoi (Lies).

λέγω  [264 verses](1st sg pres ind act) "Tell" is lego, which means "to recount," "to tell over," "to say," "to speak," "to teach," "to mean," "boast of," "tell of," "recite," nominate," and "command." When used with an object is has the sense of "call by name."  It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself," "pick up," "gather," "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay," "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." Since this is the most common such word Jesus uses, perhaps translating it consistently as "say" works best. 

ὑμῖν [289 verses](pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." 

συμφέρει [5 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "It is expedient" is symphero, which means "to bring together," "to gather," "collect," "to confer a benefit," "to be useful," "work with," "be with," and "agree with." In the passive, it means "to come together," "to engage," "to battle," [of events] "to occur," "to happen," and [literally] "to be carried along with." 

ὑμῖν [289 verses](pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἵνα [134 verses](adv/conj) "That" is hina, which means "in that place," "there," "where," "when,"  but when beginning a phrase "so that," "in order that," "when," and "because."

ἐγὼ [162 verses](pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first-person singular pronoun meaning "I." It also means "I at least," "for my part," "indeed," and for myself.

ἀπέλθω. [22 verses](verb 1st sg aor subj act) "Go away" is aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from," "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

ὰν [162 verses](conj) "If" is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) and an (might), which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. This is how we use the word "when."

γὰρ [205 verses](partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

μὴ [447 verses](partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. With pres. or aor. subj. used in a warning or statement of fear, "take care" It can be the conjunction "lest" or "for fear that." Used before tis with an imperative to express a will or wish for something in independent sentences and, with subjunctives, to express prohibitions.

ἀπέλθω, [22 verses](verb 1st sg aor subj act) "Go away" is aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from," "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

παράκλητος [4 verses](adj sg masc nom) "Comforter" is from parakletos, which is an adjective that means "called to one's aid", "assisting in legal matters", "acting as an advocate", and "summoned." It is from the root, kletos (κλητός) which means "invited." The prefix primarily generally means "from."

οὐ μὴ [39 verses](partic) "Never" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἔλθῃ [198 verses](3rd sg aor subj act) "Come" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

πρὸς [92 verses](prep)  "Unto" is from pros, which means "from (place)," "on the side of," "toward," "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "before (supplication, a judge, a witness)," "near" a time, "for" the moment, "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable," "in comparison with," "becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before."  It also means "dependent upon."

ὑμᾶς [210 verses](pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural objective form of the second-person pronoun, "you."

ὰν [162 verses](conj) "If" is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) and an (might), which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. This is how we use the word "when."

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). With the Greek word for "if" the sense is "if...than."

πορευθῶ[54 verses](verb 1st sg aor subj pass) "Depart" is poreuomai (poreuo) which means "make to go," "carry," "convey," "bring," "go," "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT.

πέμψω [39 verses](1st sg fut ind act) "I will send"is pempo, which means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort."

αὐτὸν [720 verses](adj sg masc gen) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." In the plural, "they," "them," and "their." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

πρὸς [92 verses](prep)  "Unto" is from pros, which means "from (place)," "on the side of," "toward," "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "before (supplication, a judge, a witness)," "near" a time, "for" the moment, "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable," "in comparison with," "becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before."  It also means "dependent upon."

ὑμᾶς [210 verses](pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural objective form of the second-person pronoun, "you."

KJV Analysis: 

Nevertheless -- The Greek word translated as "nevertheless" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "instead" or "rather." It is not the common word usually translated as "but." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, "not this," with a positive one, "instead this."

I -- The pronoun "I" is used here.  When it has no verb, the verb "is" or the previous verb is assumed. When the subject of the sentence is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subject pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

tell -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," "to tell," and "to speak,"  but when used with an objective noun or pronoun, the sense is "say of" or "speak of."  However, this is the first time it has been used in this part of John, where a lot of different Greek words have been translated as "tell." When two accusative objects are used, the sense is  "say of him this," or "call him this." The form Jesus uses to describe his own speaking can be either indicative, "I say/tell" or subjunctive, "I should/could say/tell."  It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself."

you -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

truth; -- The literal meaning of the Greek word for "truth" is "not hidden," and it means what is real as opposed to how things seem. Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance.

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb.

expedient  -  (CW) The verb translated as "expedient" means "to bring together," "work with," and "agree with." The word translated as "it is expedient" primarily means "to collect" or "bring together." One of its secondary meanings is "to confer a benefit." It was used like we use the phrase "getting it together" to mean making an improvement. Jesus always uses it humorously playing on the "getting it together" sense of improvement.

for -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context.

you  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc.

that -- The word translated as "that" is a conjunction that starts a subordinate clause  "that," "in order that" or "because." It is used as an introduction to a command, where it isn't translated. -- The word translated as "there" is an adverb "in that place," "there," "where," or "when."

I -- The pronoun "I" is used here.  When it has no verb, the verb "is" or the previous verb is assumed. When the subject of the sentence is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subject pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

go -- The Greek verb translated as  "go" means "to go away," "to depart from," "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

away: - This completes the meaning of the verb. It is from the prefix, which means "out of."

for --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause."

if -- (CW) The Greek word meaning "when" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is how we use the word "when." This is not the simple "if."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

go -- The Greek verb translated as  "go" means "to go away," "to depart from," "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

not --  The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" or "think" something, not that it isn't done or thought. Used in negative "when" and "if" clauses. 

away: - This completes the meaning of the verb. It is from the prefix,  which means "out of."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Comforter -- (CW) "Comforter" is an adjective that means "called to one's aid", "assisting in legal matters", "acting as an advocate", and "summoned." Its acts like a noun when introduced by the definite article. Its sense is "the assistant" but since it root is "invited" perhaps "summoned assistant" is more complete.

will -- (WW) This helping verb indicates that the verb is the future tense, but it isn't. It is in the form of possibility so it needs a "should" or "might."

not -- (CW) The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying, "never" or literally, "you cannot really think." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

unto  -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

you; -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

if -- (CW) The Greek word meaning "when" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is how we use the word "when." This is not the simple "if."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

depart, -- The Greek verb translated as "go" is the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT. This word means "to lead over," "depart," and "to carry over." However, this word uniquely means "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." In the active voice, it means "made to go" or "carried over" but in the passive or middle,its normal form, the subject is either being taken or taking himself and means "going," "crossing over," or "departing" more directly.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

send -- "Send" is from a Greek verb that means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort." This is the second most common word Jesus uses that is translated as "send out," but this one doesn't have the prefix that has the sense of "out."

him -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

unto -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

you. -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

KJV Translation Issues: 

8
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "expedient" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "comforter" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "will" should be something more like "should."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" does not capture the word's specific meaning.

NIV : 

John 16:7 But very truly I tell you, it is for your good that I am going away. Unless I go away, the Advocate will not come to you; but if I depart, I will send him to you.

NIV Analysis: 

But -- (CW)  The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "instead" or "rather." It is not the common word usually translated as "but." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, "not this," with a positive one, "instead this."

I -- The pronoun "I" is used here.  When it has no verb, the verb "is" or the previous verb is assumed. When the subject of the sentence is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

very -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "very" in the Greek source.

truly ; -- (WF) The literal meaning of the Greek word for "truth" is "not hidden," and it means what is real as opposed to how things seem. Applied to people, it means "truthfulness" and "sincerity." The opposite of a lie or appearance. This is not an adverb but a noun.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subject pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

tell -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," "to tell," and "to speak,"  but when used with an objective noun or pronoun, the sense is "say of" or "speak of."  However, this is the first time it has been used in this part of John, where a lot of different Greek words have been translated as "tell." When two accusative objects are used, the sense is  "say of him this," or "call him this." The form Jesus uses to describe his own speaking can be either indicative, "I say/tell" or subjunctive, "I should/could say/tell."  It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself."

you -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc.

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb.

for -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context.

your  -- (WF) The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. This is not a possessive form.

good -  -  (WF, WW) The verb translated as "good" means "to bring together," "work with," and "agree with." Itis a verb, not a noun. It is not the word "good." The word translated as "it is expedient" primarily means "to collect" or "bring together." One of its secondary meanings is "to confer a benefit." It was used like we use the phrase "getting it together" to mean making an improvement. Jesus always uses it humorously playing on the "getting it together" sense of improvement.

that -- The word translated as "that" is a conjunction that starts a subordinate clause  "that," "in order that" or "because." It is used as an introduction to a command, where it isn't translated. -- The word translated as "there" is an adverb "in that place," "there," "where," or "when."

I -- The pronoun "I" is used here.  When it has no verb, the verb "is" or the previous verb is assumed. When the subject of the sentence is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subject pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

go -- The Greek verb translated as  "go" means "to go away," "to depart from," "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

away: - This completes the meaning of the verb. It is from the prefix, which means "out of."

missing "because"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "because" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause."

Unless -- (CW) The Greek word meaning "unless" comes from two Greek words, that mean "when not." "When" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" or "think" something, not that it isn't done or thought.   With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. This is the negative used with commands or requests. Used with an imperative to express a will or wish. Used in negative "when" and "if" clauses. 

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

go -- The Greek verb translated as  "go" means "to go away," "to depart from," "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

away: - This completes the meaning of the verb. It is from the prefix,  which means "out of."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article; without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

Advocate -- (CW) "Advocate " is an adjective that means "called to one's aid", "assisting in legal matters", "acting as an advocate", and "summoned." Its acts like a noun when introduced by the definite article. Its sense is "the assistant" but since it root is "invited" perhaps "summoned assistant" is more complete.

will -- (WW) This helping verb indicates that the verb is the future tense, but it isn't. It is in the form of possibility so it needs a "should" or "might."

not -- (CW) The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying, "never" or literally, "you cannot really think." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

to  -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

you; -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

if -- (CW) The Greek word meaning "when" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is how we use the word "when." This is not the simple "if."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

go , --  (CW) The Greek verb translated as "go" is the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT. This word means "to lead over," "depart," and "to carry over." However, this word uniquely means "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." In the active voice, it means "made to go" or "carried over" but in the passive or middle,its normal form, the subject is either being taken or taking himself and means "going," "crossing over," or "departing" more directly.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

send -- "Send" is from a Greek verb that means "send," "send forth," "send away," "conduct," and "escort." This is the second most common word Jesus uses that is translated as "send out," but this one doesn't have the prefix that has the sense of "out."

him -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

to -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

you. -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object of the action or preposition. As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.
 

NIV Translation Issues: 

15
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "but" is not the common word usually translated as "but."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "very" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "truly" is not an adverb but a noun.
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "your" is not a possessive but the subject of the sentence,
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "good" is not a noun, but part of a verb.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "good" should be something more like "gets it together."
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "unless" does not capture the two Greek words' specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "advocate" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "will" should be something more like "should."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" does not capture the word's specific meaning.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "go" does not capture the word's specific meaning.

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Front Page Date: 

Nov 21 2022