John 4:14 But whosoever drinketh of the water

Spoken to: 

an individual

Context: 

To the Samaritan woman after she asks him why he, a Judean, asked her for a drink of water. She then asks if he is greater than Jacob who dug her well.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Whosoever, however, might possibly drink from this water that I myself will give him, never will he thirst for a lifetime. Instead, the water that I will give him will become in him a source of water springing until a life perpetual.

My Takeaway: 

The life within us can carry over to more lives after death.

KJV : 

John 4:14 But whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life.

NIV : 

John 4:14 but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There are a lot of untranslated words in this verse.

In the first phrase, we have the particle an, which expresses a limitation. In recent verses, we have seen it used instead of the subjunctive. Here, it is used with the subjunctive, indicating that "drinking" is a limited possibility. In the alternative, this feeling is expressed by the phrase "might possibly." Both the subjunctive and this particle are ignored in the KJV.

This phrase about thirsting ends with a couple of untranslated words meaning "in a lifetime."  However, it seems relevant here, providing context for the final phrase.

The word translated as "well," doesn't mean "well." It means "running water." It is used to describe a water's source, where it moves out of the ground. The word is used to mean "source" and "origin." It is not the word translated in the surrounding verses as Jacob's well. It is a play on words with the verb translated as "springing" and "welling." Though the noun and verb are from separate roots, the ideas are related. There is no "up" in the Greek, but this idea of a source of water bubbling up is part of the image if not the words.

Finally, we have the "into" in the phrase "into everlasting life." While it does mean "into" when referring to a place, it means "until" when referring to a time. Here it is used to refer to both a regular lifetime (ignored in KJV) and an everlasting lifetime, which seem more like time. In the first occurrence, "for a lifetime" captures the idea better. While in the last, "until" captures a different sense of the word.

Wordplay: 

 Strangely, there is a play on words here that only works in English. This last phrase describes what we would call as "spring" of water, "springing" into eternal life. Makes me wonder if Christ's words can be translated into plays on words in all languages. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὃς [294 verses](pron sg masc nom) This" is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

δ᾽ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἂν [60 verses](particle) Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have," "might," "should," and "could." 

πίῃ [36 verses](3rd sg aor subj act) "Drinketh" is  pino, which means "to drink," "to celebrate," and "soak up."

ἐκ [121 verses] (prep) "From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from;" 6) cause, instrument, or means "by."

τοῦ [821 verses](article sg neut gen)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ὕδατος [12 verses](noun sg neut gen)  "Water" is hydor, which means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

οὗ [294 verses](pron sg neut gen ) "That" is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἐγὼ [162 verses](pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first-person singular pronoun meaning "I." It also means "I at least," "for my part," "indeed," and for myself.

δώσω [147 verses](1st sg fut ind act) "Shall give" is didomi, which means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe."

αὐτῷ [720 verses](adj sg masc dat) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

οὐ [269 verses](partic) "Never" is ou ( οὒ ) which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences.  The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

μὴ [447 verses](partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. With pres. or aor. subj. used in a warning or statement of fear, "take care" It can be the conjunction "lest" or "for fear that."

διψήσει [10 verses] (3rd sg fut ind act) "Thirst" is dipsao, which means "to thirst," "to be thirsty," "to be parched," "to be in want of," "to lack," and "to thirst after" a thing. 

εἰς [325 verses](prep) Untranslated is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὸν [821 verses](article sg masc acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

αἰῶνα [41 verses](noun sg masc acc) Untranslated is aion, which means "life," "lifetime," "age," or "generation."

ἀλλὰ [154 verses](conj) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay."

τὸ [821 verses](article sg neut nom/acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ὕδωρ[12 verses](noun sg neut nom/acc)  "Water" is hydor, which means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

[294 verses](pron sg neut nom/acc ) "That" is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

δώσω [147 verses](1st sg fut ind act) "I shall give" is didomi, which means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." -- The verb translated as "given" means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

αὐτῷ [720 verses](adj sg masc dat) "His" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

γενήσεται [117 verses] (3rd sg fut ind mid) "Shall be" is ginomai, which means "to become," "to come into being," "to happen," of things "to be produced," of events "happen," "take place," "come to pass," "to be engaged in," math "to be multiplied into," "become one of," "turn into."and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi) which indicates existence in the same state.

ἐν [413 verses](prep) "In" is en, which means, with a dative object, "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," "during,"  and "with." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." Referring to time, it means. "in the course of" or "during." 

αὐτῷ [720 verses](adj sg masc dat) "His" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it."

πηγὴ [1 verse](noun sg fem nom) "A well" is from pege, which means "running water," "font," "source," and is a metaphor for "stream" and "origin."  - -

ὕδατος [12 verses](noun sg gen)  "Water" is hydor, which means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

ἁλλομένου [1 verse](part sg pres mid masc gen) "Springing up" is hallomai, which means "spring," "leap," "leap over," "bounding," and [of parts of the body] "twitch." --

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

ζωὴν [42 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is zoe, which means "living," "substance," "property," "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

αἰώνιον [23 verses](adj sg fem acc) "Everlasting" is aionios, which means "lasting for an age," "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age."

KJV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It also an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

whosoever -- The word translated as "whosoever" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

missing "possibly"  -- (MW) Untranslated is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English but "possibly" is close. This word works similarly to the "might" or "should" of a subjunctive verb, but we don't want to confuse it with the subjunctive so using "possibly" provides a consistent translation.  This particle usually suggests the subjunctive form of the verb but can be used without it. The same Greek letters can always be the more common conjunction meaning "when," so this meaning comes from context.

missing "should" or "might"-- (MW) A helping verb is necessary because the following verb is a verb of possibility, a subjunctive, something that "should" or "might" occur. The helping verb is not needed in a clause beginning with an "if" or a "when."

drinketh -- The word "drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink." It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

of -- (CW) The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases the "of" phrases.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

water -- "Water" is the noun that means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

that -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subjective pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

give -- The verb translated as "give" means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. 

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

never -- The "never" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying, "never" or literally, "you cannot really think." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

thirst; - "Thirsty" is another common verb which means "to thirst," "to be thirsty," and "to thirst after" a thing. Again, it is the same verb used in the fourth beatitude.

missing "up to"  -- (MW) The untranslated word means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

missing "lifetime"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "lifetime," "life," "a space of time," "an age," an epoch," and "the present world." See this article on words translated as "world" in Jesus's words

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, not doing something, with a positive one, "instead do this."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

water -- "Water" is the noun that means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

that -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

give -- The verb translated as "give" means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. 

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- (WW) The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen" or "take place." For things, it can be "to be produced." When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within," "with" (an instrument), "during" (time),  or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.  With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. 

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

well   - (CW) The word translated as "well," doesn't mean "well." It means "running water." It is used to describe a water's source, where it moves out of the ground. The word is used to mean "source" and "origin." It is not the word translated in the surrounding verses as Jacob's well.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

water -- "Water" is the noun that means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

springing -- "Springing" is from a word means to "spring," "leap," "leap over," "bounding," and [of parts of the body] "twitch." --

up ---- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "up" in the Greek source.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

everlasting  -- "Everlasting" is an adjective based on the word that means "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless."

life. -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance," "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life. For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

KJV Translation Issues: 

10
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "possibly" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "might" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "of" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "myself" is not shown in the English translation, but it is needed to capture the pronoun as well as the form of the verb.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "up to" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "lifetime" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "be" should be "become."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "well" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "up" doesn't exist in the source.

NIV Analysis: 

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It also an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

whoever -- The word translated as "whosoever" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

missing "possibly"  -- (MW) Untranslated is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English but "possibly" is close. This word works similarly to the "might" or "should" of a subjunctive verb, but we don't want to confuse it with the subjunctive so using "possibly" provides a consistent translation.  This particle usually suggests the subjunctive form of the verb but can be used without it. The same Greek letters can always be the more common conjunction meaning "when," so this meaning comes from context.

missing "should" or "might"-- (MW) A helping verb is necessary because the following verb is a verb of possibility, a subjunctive, something that "should" or "might" occur. The helping verb is not needed in a clause beginning with an "if" or a "when."

drinks -- The word "drinks" is the Greek for meaning to "drink." It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

missing "out of"  -- (MW) The untranslated word means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases the "of" phrases.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

water -- "Water" is the noun that means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

that -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

missing "myself" -- (MW)  The subjective pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."

missing "will"  -- (MW) The untranslated helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

give -- The verb translated as "give" means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

them -- (WN) The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The word is singular, not plural.

will -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

never -- The "never" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying, "never" or literally, "you cannot really think." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

thirst; - "Thirsty" is another common verb which means "to thirst," "to be thirsty," and "to thirst after" a thing. Again, it is the same verb used in the fourth beatitude.

missing "up to"  -- (MW) The untranslated word means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

missing "lifetime"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "lifetime," "life," "a space of time," "an age," an epoch," and "the present world." See this article on words translated as "world" in Jesus's words.

Indeed-- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather." It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." Jesus often uses this conjunction to connect a negative clause, not doing something, with a positive one, "instead do this."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

water -- "Water" is the noun that means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

that -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

missing "will"  -- (MW) The untranslated helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

give -- The verb translated as "give" means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

them -- (WN) The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The word is singular, not plural.

will -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

become -- The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen" or "take place." For things, it can be "to be produced." When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within," "with" (an instrument), "during" (time),  or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.  With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

them -- (WN) The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The word is singular, not plural.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

spring- The word translated as "spring," means "running water." It is used to describe a water's source, where it moves out of the ground. The word is used to mean "source" and "origin." It is not the word translated in the surrounding verses as Jacob's well.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

water -- "Water" is the noun that means "water," "spring water," "drinking water," "rain water," "rain," "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

welling -- "Welling " is from a word means to "spring," "leap," "leap over," "bounding," and [of parts of the body] "twitch." -- -  -

up ---- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "up" in the Greek source.

to -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

eternal   -- "Eternal" is an adjective based on the word that means "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless."

life. -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance," "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life. For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

NIV Translation Issues: 

13
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "possibly" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "might" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "out of" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "myself" is not shown in the English translation, but it is needed to capture the pronoun as well as the form of the verb.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "will" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "them" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "up to" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "lifetime" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "will" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "them" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "them" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "up" doesn't exist in the source.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 30 2022