John 6:37 All that the Father giveth me

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

After being asked for a sign as proof.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

All who he gives to me, the Father, in front of me will return. And the one showing up in front of me never will I toss out outside.

KJV : 

John 6:37 All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out.

NIV : 

John 6:37 All those the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never drive away.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Reading the English translation, we would expect the verb translated as "comes" was the same in both clauses of this verse. However, two different verbs are used. The first "come" means "return." The one who the Father has given to Jesus will always return toward him. The second "come" means "showing up." More damage is done to this verse in the NIV than in the KJV.

As in John 6:35, the second part of this verse uses a double negative to emphasize that this cannot happen.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Πᾶν (adj sg neut acc or adj sg masc acc) "All" is from pas (pas), which means "all," "the whole," "every," "anyone," "all kinds," and "anything."

(pron sg neut acc or article sg masc nom) "That" is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

δίδωσίν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Giveth" is didomi, which means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe."

μοι (pron 1st sing dat) "Me" is moi, which means "I," "me," and "my."

 (article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

πατὴρ (noun sg masc nom) "The Father" is from pater (pater), which means "father," "grandfather," "author," "parent," and "forefathers."

πρὸς (prep)  "To" is from pros, which means "from (place)," "on the side of," "toward," "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "before (supplication)," "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable,""becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before."

ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I," "me," and "my."

ἥξει [10 verses](3rd sg fut ind act or 3rd sg aor subj act ) "Shall come" is heko, which means "to have come," "to be present," "to have reached a point," "to have come back," and "to return."

καὶ (prep) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

τὸν (article sg masc acc)  "Him that " is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἐρχόμενον [198 verses](part sg pres mp masc acc) "cometh" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

πρός (prep)  "To" is from pros, which means "from (place)," "on the side of," "toward," "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "before (supplication)," "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable,""becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before."

με (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I," "me," and "my."

οὐ μὴ (partic)"No wise" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἐκβάλω (1st sg fut ind act) "I will...cast" is ekballo and means "throw out," "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of," "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter."

ἔξω, [21 verses](adv) "Out" is exo, which means "out of a place," "outside," "external things," and "beyond a time."

KJV Analysis: 

All -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. It is a singular and either a masculine, or neuter object. However only masculine matches the second clause.

that  -- The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. It is a singular and a masculine object.

the - The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

Father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers." It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

giveth -- The verb translated as "given" means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

me -- The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me," though the form has other uses in Greek. 

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

come  -- (CW) The word translated as "come" is a complicated one because it indicates a "coming" that has been completed, that is, "to arrive" or, even, "to be present." As a metaphor, it means "to be a follower." This is not the word translated as "come" below." Jesus seems to use this word more often to mean "return."

to  - -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

me; -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object of the verb or preposition.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also")

him that -- (CW) The word translated as "him that" the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

cometh -- (WF) The word translated as "cometh" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more. This is not an active verb but a verbal adjective/noun.

to  - -- The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," "before" both in time and place, "in the presence of," "against," and several other types of "before." With verbs of seeing it specifically means "towards."

me; -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek as the object ofthe verb or preposition.

I  - -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

in -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "in" in the Greek source.

no wise -- (CW) The "no  wise" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying, "never" or literally, "you cannot really think." When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

cast -- "Cast out" is a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out," "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

out. -- This is from the prefix of the previous verb that means "out of."

missing "out"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is a second "out" means "out of a place" and "outside."

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "cometh" is not the common word usually translated as "come."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "him that" is not the common words usually translated as "him that" but "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "cometh" is not an active verb but a participle, "coming."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "in" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "no wise" is not the common words usually translated as "no wise" but "never."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

All those the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never drive away.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 8 2021