John 6:40 And this is the will of him that sent me,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Since this is the pleasure of my Father: every one contemplating the Son and believing in him holds perpetual life and I should raise him up [from the dead] on the last day. >

KJV : 

Jhn 6:40 And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This seems like a restatement or clarification of the previous verse, Jhn 6:39. It uses similar vocabulary in parallel ways. However, it adds one idea, that those that will be saved are those that "seeth" and "believeth" in the son.

The word translated as "seeth" is not a Greek word usually used to mean "seeing." The Greek words blepo, seeing with the eyes, and eido, seeing with the mind, are the words almost always used by Jesus in the NT.

What is different about the Greek word theōreō, used here?

It means seeing something special. It is specifically used to refer to being sent to see an oracle. So those that are saved are those that see the Son as an oracle or as something special, not just those that physically saw him or even those who try to understand him. These are those that are in awe of him, that look at him in wonder.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

τοῦτο "This" is from toutô (touto), which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]."

γάρ "And" comes from gar (gar) which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ἐστιν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

τὸ θέλημα "The will" is from the noun, thelêma (thelema), which means "will" and "pleasure."

τοῦ πατρός "The Father" is from pater (pater), which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

μου "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

ἵνα "That" is from hina (hina), which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

πᾶς "Every one" is from pas (pas), which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything."

"Which" is from ho, which is the masculine, singular article, usually translated as "the."

θεωρῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "Seeth" is from theōreō(theoreo), which means "to see", "to look at", "to behold," (of the mind) "to contemplate", "to consider", "to observe (as a spectator)", "to gaze", "to gape", "to inspect (troops)" and, in abstract, "to theorize" and "to speculate." It originally means literally, "to be sent to see an oracle."

τὸν υἱὸν "The Son" is from huios (huios), which means a "son," and more generally, a "child."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πιστεύων (part sg pres act masc nom) "Believeth" is from pisteuô (pisteuo), which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person", "to believe in someone's words", "to comply", "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing."

εἰς On" is from eis (eis), which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

αὐτὸν "Him" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἔχῃ (3rd sg pres subj act) "May have" is from echô (echo), which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ζωὴν "Life" is from zôê (zoe), which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

αἰώνιον, "Everlasting" is from aiônios (aionios), which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀναστήσω (1st sg aor subj act) "Will raise...up" is from anistêmi (anistemi), which means "to make stand up", "to raise up", "to raise from sleep", "to wake up", "to raise from the dead", "to rouse to action", "to put up for sale", "to make people rise", "to emigrate", "to transplant," and "to rise and leave the sanctuary."

αὐτὸν "Him" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

τῇἐσχάτῃ "At the last" is from eschatos (eschatos). In space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending."

ἡμέρᾳ "Day" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."