John 7:28 Ye both know me,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Not only have you seen me, but you have also seen where I am from and [that] I did not start out for myself. However, it is no secret that you have not seen the one has sent me.

KJV : 

Jhn 7:28 Ye both know me, and ye know whence I am: and I am not come of myself, but he that sent me is true, whom ye know not.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Does Christ every use any form of the verb "to be" other than the present tense? I have looked at a lot of Christ's words and, while the narrative uses the various tenses of the verb "to be," it seems that Christ only uses the present tense. Much has been made of the fact that he refers to himself with the phrase "I am", but he also refers to people and objects as if they always exist in the present.

While Christ words often get translated into the past tense of "to be," in Greek, the verbs I see are in the present. For example, in Jhn 14:9, the verb gets translated as "Have I been with you so long," but the Greek is in the present tense. "Am I with you so long?"

This verse here is a good example of Christ's default to the present tense for verbs of being while all other verbs in it are in a form of the past tense. The verb translated multiple times as "know" is in the perfect tense as is the participle for the one sending him. The verb translated as "come" is in the aorist tense, also usually translated as the past tense in English. However, the two forms of the verb "to be", "I am" and "it is" are both in the present tense.

While the verb translated as "know" can be translated this way, it primarily means "see" or "perceive." Christ tends to use it when he uses the word translated as "true" because that word means "not hidden."

The word translated as "come" (erchomai) is translated that way consistently in the KJV, but it means both "to come" and "to go" without a reference to whether the travel is to something or away from something. We use the phrase "on his way" or "under way" to capture this idea of making progress. Primarily, it means "start" but Christ always uses it to indicate the movement itself not the beginning of the movement.

Wordplay: 

 A play on "seeing" and the word for true which means "not hidden." 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Κἀμὲ "Both" is a contraction kame from kai me, meaning "and...me. "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

οἴδατε (2nd pl perf ind act) "Ye know" is from (eido) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οἴδατε (2nd pl perf ind act) "Ye know" is from (eido) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

πόθεν "Whence" is from pothen , (pothen) which means "whence" and "from what source."

εἰμί: (1st sg pres ind act) "I am" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀπ᾽ "Of" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

ἐμαυτοῦ "Myself" is from emautou, which means "of me," and "of myself".

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἐλήλυθα, (1st sg perf ind act) "I am come" is from erchomai (erchomai), which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ἀλλ᾽ "But" is from alla (alla), which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

ἔστιν ( 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ἀληθινὸς "True" is from alethinos, which means "agreeable to the truth," [in persons] "truthful", "trusty," [of things] "true", "genuine," [as an adverb] "really", "truly", "honestly," and "straightforwardly."

"Whom" is from hos (hos), which is the demonstrative pronoun in its various forms (hê, ho, gen. hou, hês, hou, etc. ; dat. pl. hois, hais, hois, etc. gen. hoou). It means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

πέμψας (part sg aor act masc nom) "He that sent" is from pempo, which means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort."

με, "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

ὃν "Whom" is from hos (hos), which is the demonstrative pronoun in its various forms (hê, ho, gen. hou, hês, hou, etc. ; dat. pl. hois, hais, hois, etc. gen. hoou). It means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ὑμεῖς "You" is from humas (humas) and humôn (humon), which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

οἴδατε: 2nd pl perf ind act) "Know" is from (eido) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."