John 4:16 Go, call thy husband,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

To the Samaritan woman after she asks him for a drink of his water.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Call thine, that husband, and come here.

My Takeaway: 

The water of life requires a partner in life.

KJV : 

John 4:16 Go, call thy husband, and come hither.

NIV : 

John 4:16  Go, call your husband and come back.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὕπαγε [47 verses](2nd sg pres imperat) "I go" is hypago, which means "to lead under," "to bring under," "to bring a person before judgment," "to lead on by degrees," "to take away from beneath," "to withdraw," "to go away," "to retire," "to draw off," and "off with you."

φώνησόν [10 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Call" is phoneo which means "to produce a sound or tone," "to speak loudly or clearly" (of men), "uttering cries" (of animals), "affirm" (in court), "call by name," "command," and "speak of." 

σου” [144 verses](pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is sou is the genitive form of the second-person, singular pronoun that means "of you" and "your." 

τὸν [821 verses](article sg masc acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἄνδρα [10 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Husband" is from aner, which means "a man (as opposed to a god)", "a man (as opposed to a woman)", "a husband", "a man in the prime of life (as opposed to a youth)," and "a man indeed."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but."

ἐλθὲ  [198 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Come" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ἐνθάδε. [1 verse](adv) "Hither" is from enthade, which means "hither," "thither," "here," and "now."

KJV Analysis: 

Go, - -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go," but he often uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

call - -- (CW) The word translated as "call" simply means "to utter cries."  It means the cries of animals, but it also refers specifically to someone calling another name. It is not the common word that means "call."

thy  -- The word translated as "thy" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

husband, -- "Husband" is a noun that isn't the normal Greek word translated as "man" but a special word that indicates that manliness of "men," both for good and bad. In English, we would say "male." It emphasizes the adult man when compared to a youth or the mortality of a man when compared to the divinity of God. It is also used to mean "husband."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). "

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

hither. - - "Hither" is an adverb that means "hither," "thither," "here," and "now."

KJV Translation Issues: 

2
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "call" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "husband" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

Go, call husband and come .

Go, - -- "Go" is a Greek verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," and Jesus uses it to mean "go," but he often uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

call - -- (CW) The word translated as "call" simply means "to utter cries."  It means the cries of animals, but it also refers specifically to someone calling another name. It is not the common word that means "call."

your -- The word translated as "your " is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

husband, -- "Husband" is a noun that isn't the normal Greek word translated as "man" but a special word that indicates that manliness of "men," both for good and bad. In English, we would say "male." It emphasizes the adult man when compared to a youth or the mortality of a man when compared to the divinity of God. It is also used to mean "husband."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). "

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

back. - - (CW)  "Back" is an adverb that means "hither," "thither," "here," and "now." It is not the Greek word that means "back."

  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "call" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "husband" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "back" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 31 2022