Luke 11:40 Ye fools, did not he that made that which is without

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

You mindless, not the one making the exterior and the interior make?

You mindless, didn't the maker make the exterior and the interior?

KJV : 

Luke 11:40 Ye fools, did not he that made that which is without make that which is within also?

What is Lost in Translation: 

The adjective translated as "you fools" means  "mindless," "senseless" (of statues), "frantic," "crazed," "silly," and "foolish."  This is the first time it is used in the Gospels by Jesus. It is used only once more. Its root words mean "no mind." 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

The Greek word translated as "did he that made" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It describes a productive action. It is in the form of an adjective, "making," used as a noun, "the one making." 

The word translated as "the without" is normally an adverb meaning "outside" and "from without." It is the opposite of the Greek word translated later in verse as "inwardly." The difference is the presence of an article, making this "the outwardly."

The Greek word translated as "make" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It describes a productive action. It is the same verb as the one above used as the subject of the sentence, but here it is in the form of a verb. 

"The within" is an adverb meaning "from inside" and "inward," but it is used as a noun because it is introduced by an article, "the inward." It has the sense of "insider" and "being special" in contrast to "outsider" and "being common." This is the same structure that is used later in the verse translated as "the outside." 

The Greek word translated as "also" is used as the conjunction "and" appearing between the "without" and "within." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἄφρονες,[uncommon](adj pl masc voc) ) "You fools" is aphron, which means  "senseless" (of statues), "frantic," "crazed," "silly," and "foolish." 

 οὐχ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

ποιήσας (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Did he that make" is poieo, which means "to make," "to produce," "to create," "to bring into existence," "to bring about," "to cause," "to render," "to consider," "to prepare," "to make ready," and "to do." -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do," which covers all actions, productive or not. 

τὸ (article sg neut acc) ἔξωθεν  (adv) "The without" is from exothen, which is normally an adverb meaning "from without" and "outward." When used as a noun, "the outside" or "those outside."

καὶ (conj/adv) "Also" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." --

τὸ ἔσωθεν  (noun sg neut acc) "The within" is esothen, which means "from within" and "inward." -- "Within" is the adverb meaning "inwardly."

ἐποίησεν; (part sg aor act masc nom) "Make" is poieo, which means "to make," "to produce," "to create," "to bring into existence," "to bring about," "to cause," "to render," "to consider," "to prepare," "to make ready," and "to do." --

Front Page Date: 

Mar 8 2018