Luke 16:19 There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen,

KJV : 

Luke 16:19 There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day:

Literal Verse: 

A man, however, a someone, was wealthy. Not only did he put on himself purple but also linen, making himself happy during day vigorously. 

What is Lost in Translation: 

This is the first line of the strangest story Jesus tells. There are a number of elements that set it apart from all his other stories. This verse is no exception, with three unique words for Jesus to use and one uncommon one. 

An untranslated Greek word  appears near the beginning of this sentence that means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

There was The verb "there was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.   When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." However, here is is clearly NOT used that way, appearing between the subject and its characteristic, despite the translation. 

The word translated as "a certain" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but can be used to mean someone of note as we would say "a someone". 

"Rich" is from an adjective that means "rich," and "opulent." It very much has the sense of ostentatiously rich. In the Greek, it appears after the verb, "was rich". 

The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular.  This word begins the sentence in Greek. 

There is no "which" here. Instead, there is the Greek word the means "and", which is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." There is a series here. 

"Was clothed" is from a Greek verb that Jesus only uses here, which means to "put on" oneself or another. It is an extended form of the common word meaning "put on".  This word is only found in the Bible and writings about it. The form is someone acting on themselves, "he put on himself.".

There is no "in" in the Greek. It isn't needed in the Greek. 

"Purple" is the Greek adjective that means "purple", "purple dyed" and a "purple stripe". This is the only time Jesus uses this word. The purple stripe was specifically used on the clothing of Roman senators and the color from purple snails was known as Tyrian purple. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

"Fine linen" is from the Greek word that means "flax", and the linen made from it, 

There is no "and" in the Greek. The verb is not active so it is no required. 

The Greek verb translated as  "fared" means "cheer", "gladden", and in the passive, "make merry" and "enjoy oneself". It is used only in parables by Luke, most commonly in the parable of the prodigal son. It is in the form of an adjective, "making merry" where the subject acts on himself, "making himself merry". 

"Sumptuously" is another word that Jesus only used here. As an adjective, it means "bright," "radiant" and  of outward appearance, "splendid", "brilliant", and as an adverb "furiously", "keenly contested",  "vigorously", and "utterly".

The word translated as "every" means is a preposition that, when used with time, means "during".  It is not the word usually translated as "every". 

The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

Greek : 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "Man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

δέ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). 

τις (pron sg masc nom) "A certain" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what." 

ἦν (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "There was" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") --

πλούσιος, (adj pl masc acc) "Rich" is from plousios, which means "rich," and "opulent." It very much has the sense of ostentatiously rich. 

καὶ (conj/adv) Untranslated is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐνεδιδύσκετο [unique](verb 3rd sg imperf ind mp) "Was clothed" is endidysko which means to "put on" oneself or another. Extended form of endyo. Found only in NT and after. 

πορφύραν [unique](noun sg fem acc) "Purple" is porphyrawhich means "purple", a "purple fish," "purple dye" and a "purple stripe". 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

βύσσον [unique](noun sg fem acc) "Fine linen" is byssos which means "flax", and the linen made from it, 

εὐφραινόμενος [uncommon] (part sg pres mp masc nom) "Fared" is euphrainowhich means "cheer", "gladden", and in the passive, "make merry", "enjoy oneself".  

καθ᾽ (prep) "Every" is kata, which, as a preposition, means "downwards", "down from", "down into", "against", "down toward", "opposite", "separately", "individually", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally." As an adverb, it means "according as", "just as", "in so far as", "wherefore", "like as if" and "exactly as." 

ἡμέραν  (noun sg fem acc) "Day" is hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)." 

λαμπρῶς.[unique](adv or adj pl masc acc ) "Sumptuously" is from lamprōswhich means "bright," "radiant" and  of outward appearance, "splendid", "brilliant", and as an adverb "furiously", "keenly contested",  "vigorously", and "utterly".

Front Page Date: 

Aug 23 2018