Luke 16:22 And it came to pass, that the beggar died,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

He happened, however, to die off, the beggar, and to be carried off, the same one, under messengers into the belly of Abraham. He died, however, also the wealthy one and he was buried. 

KJV : 

Luke 16:22 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried;

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse introduces the concept of "the bosom of Abraham", which exists only in this story in the NT. It may be related to the "table of Abraham" mentioned in Matthew 8:11 and the practice of reclining at tables, putting one man's head at another's belly or bosom. The concept may be related to the Greek concept of the "feelings of the chest", which is discussed in this article: "Life," "Soul," " Mind," "Heart", and "Spirit". This verse is also unusual in that it uses infinitives with their own subjects. This is very unusual in Jesus's use of language. 

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The word translated as "it came to pass" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

There is no "that" here. It is added to correct a problem with the verbs. 

"The beggar " is an adjective that means "a beggar" and "beggarly". The form is not the normal subjective form, but the one used by the infinitive. 

"Died" is a Greek verb that means "to die" and "to die off."  It is in the form of an infinitive, "to die off" 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

There is an untranslated word here that means  "him". The form is not the normal subjective form, but the one used by the infinitive. 

"Was carried" is a Greek verb that means to "carry off or away", "pay back", "return", "bring in", "bring", and "hand over as required".  This verb is also an infinitive and passive. Again, the passive form doesn't fit the objective pronoun. 

The word translated as "by" primarily means "by", "under," or "with" (with the genitive and a passive verb). Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion.

"The angels" is a noun meaning "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use from its use in the NT.

The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

Abraham's "Abraham" is the Greek form of "Abraham."

"Bosom" is fhe Greek noun that means "bosom", "lap", "fold of a garment", "womb", and, of the sea, "bay".  It is closer to the "lap" or "belly" than the chest. Jesus commonly uses the term for heart to describe feelings of the chest.  This word and concept is only used in this story. 

"The rich man" is from an adjective that means "rich," and "opulent." It very much has the sense of ostentatiously rich. Here, it is used with an article, "the rich" but unlike English the sense is not a group of people, which would be plural, not singular, but "one who is wealthy", "the wealthy one." 

"Rich man" is from an adjective that means "rich," and "opulent." It very much has the sense of ostentatiously rich. Here, it is used with an article, "the rich" but unlike English the sense is not a group of people, which would be plural, not singular, but "one who is wealthy."

The Greek word usually translated as "but" appears here but it ignored. 

The Greek word translated as "also" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). 

"Died" is from the same Greek verb as above,  which means "to die" and "to die off."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." 

"Was buried" is the Greek verb that means "to pay the last dues to a corpse", "to honor with funeral rites."

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἐγένετο (verb 3rd sg aor ind mid) "It came to pass" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state. --

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

ἀποθανεῖν (verb aor inf act ) "Died" is from apothnesko, which means "to die" and "to die off."

τὸν πτωχὸν (adj sg masc acc) "the beggar" is ptochos, which means "beggar", "beggar-woman," and "beggarly."  -- 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ἀπενεχθῆναι [unique](verb aor inf pass) "Was carried" is apopherō,  which means to "carry off or away", "pay back", "return", "bring in", "bring", and "hand over as required".

αὐτὸν  (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

ὑπὸ (adj sg masc gen) (prep) "By" is hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)", "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by", "under," or "with", "under the cover or protection of", "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate", "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection", "control", "dependence," of Time, "in the course of", "during", "about," as an adverb, "under", "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by", "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause). --

τῶν ἀγγέλων (noun pl masc/fem gen) "Angels" is aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use. 

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὸν κόλπον (uncommon] (noun sg masc acc) "Bosom" is from kolpos, which means "bosom", "lap", "fold of a garment", "womb", and, of the sea, "bay". 

Ἀβραάμ: (Hebrew name) "Abraham" is Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham."

ἀπέθανεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Died" is from apothnesko, which means "to die" and "to die off."

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πλούσιος (adj pl masc nom) "The rich man" is from plousios, which means "rich," and "opulent." It very much has the sense of ostentatiously rich. -- ​

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἐτάφη.  (verb 3rd sg aor ind pass ) "Was buried" is from thapto, which also means "to pay the last dues to a corpse", "to honor with funeral rites."

Front Page Date: 

Aug 26 2018