Luke 16:26 And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed:

Spoken to: 

audience

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And in all this between us and you all a chasm, a great one, has established itself.  In order that the ones desiring to step across from here to you all, not to have the power. Nor from that place to us do they traverse. 

KJV : 

Luke 16:26 And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse gives us more perspective on the afterlife, which is very uncharacteristic of Jesus's stories. Strangely, the pronoun "you" here changes from singular to plural. So the "you" means not just the rich man but all those in his position. The "in all this" that begins the sentence seems to refer to the two choices referenced in the previous verse, Luke 16:25. The inability to cross between the two realms here is a matter of thinking or desiring. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). 

The word translated as "beside" also means "within," "with," or "among."

The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way," "on every side," and "altogether."

"This" is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this," "here," "the nearer," and "the familiar."

The "between" is a Greek adverb that has the sense of "between" two places or "between" to parties to an agreement or discussion.

The "us" is the plural possessive first-person pronoun. Jesus only uses this pronoun in seven verses, most often in the Lord's Prayer

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). 

The word translated as "you" is plural, indicating that it refers to everyone in the rich man's state. The "you" in the previous verse, Luke 16:25, was singular, referring just to the rich man. 

"There is" is typically translated from the Greek verb "to be" used without a subject. Here, however, it is added to the verb because the translators didn't want to decide who or what fixed the chasm in place.  Saying either "he established" or "the chasm established" it more accurate. 

The word translated as "great" means "big," "high" "great," and "impressive."​ Its form matches the word "gulf." 

"Gulf" is the Greek source of our word "chasm,"  which means "yawning chasm," "gulf," "open," "gaping mouth," and "any wide opening." This word is only used here by Jesus.  The form of the word and its adjective is either the subject or the object of the verb. So, "the chasm has established itself" or "he has established the chasm himself." 

"Fixed" is a Greek verb that means to "make fast," "prop," "fix"​, and "support."  Jesus only uses this word twice. It is the word that means setting a stone in the ground so it won't move and putting a rainbow in the clouds, but metaphorically, it means "to establish." It is not active or passive, but the form where the subject acts for or on itself. So, "has established itself" or "has established for itself." 

The word translated as "so that" is one of those Greek words that introduce a new phrase that offers an explanation. 

The Greek word translated as "they which would" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. The Greek verb's primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something so to "desire." It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose." The form is an adjective, "desiring," introduced by an article, "the ones desiring." 

"Pass" is a Greek verb that means to "stride," to "step across," or "pass over."  This word is only used here by Jesus. It is in the form of an infinitive, "to step across."  The form is an infinitive because that form works with the "those wanting."  However, there is another infinitive object of this "they wanting" as well. 

"From hence" is a Greek word that means "from that place" and "hence." In English, in this context, we would say "from here."​

The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," and "against."​

 The "you" here is plural, indicating that it refers to everyone in the rich man's state. 

The word translated as "can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.​ The form is an infinitive because that form works with the "those wanting."  The sense is that "those desiring not...to have the power." 

The negative, not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or "don't think" something that might be true. Again, this negative is used because the sense is not "wanting" the power.

The word for "neither" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

There is no "can" verb repeated here. 

"They pass" is a Greek verb uniquely used here that means to "go over," "go across," "pass through," "pierce," "traverse," "reach," and "arrive at a place." 

The word translated as "to" means "towards," "by reason of (for)," and "against."​

"Us" is the plural object form of the first-personal pronoun. 

There is no Greek words corresponding with "that would come." 

"From thence" is a Greek adverb means "from that place," "thence," "from that fact," and "thenceforward."​

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἐν (prep) "Beside" is en, which means "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," and "with." 

πᾶσι (adj pl masc dat) "All" is pas, which means "all," "the whole," "every," "anyone," "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way," "on every side," "in every way," and "altogether."

τούτοις (adj pl masc dat) "This" is toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this," "here," "the nearer," and "the familiar." -- 

μεταξὺ [uncommon] (adv) "Between" is from metaxy, which means "in the midst" (of Place) "between," (of Time) "meanwhile," (of Qualities) "intermediate," and (of Degree) "the difference." As a preposition, it takes the genitive case and has the sense of "between" to parties to an agreement or discussion. -- 

ἡμῶν [7 verse](pron 1st pl masc/fem acc) "Us" is hemas, which is "us," the 1st person, plural, accusative pronoun. -

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." 

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "You" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

χ​άσμα [unique](noun sg neut nom/acc) "Gulf" is chasma, which means "yawning chasm," "gulf," "open," "gaping mouth," and "any wide opening."

μέγα  (adj sg neut nom/acc) "Great" is megas, which means "big," "full-grown," "vast," "high," "great," "mighty," "strong (of the elements),""loud" (of sounds), "over-great (with a bad sense), "impressive" (of style), and "long" ( of days). --

ἐστήρικται, [uncommon](verb 3rd sg perf ind mp) "There is...fixed" is stērizō, which means to "make fast," "prop," "fix"​, and "support." In the passive, "to be firmly set or fixed," and "stand fast." Metaphorically, it means to  "confirm," and "establish."

ὅπως (conj) "So that" is hopos, which is a conjunction that means "in such a manner as," "in order that," "in the manner in which," "how," [with negative] "there is no way that," and [in questions] "in what way."

οἱ θέλοντες (art pl pres act masc nom) "They which would" is thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)," "to wish," "to ordain," "to decree," "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain," "to hold," "to delight in, and "will (too express a future event with inanimate objects)." As a participle, it means "being willing" or, adverbially, "willingly," and "gladly." . --

διαβῆναι [unique](verb aor inf act) "Pass" is diabaino, which means to "stride," "walk," "walk or stand with legs apart," "planting himself firmly," "great straddling," "mighty stride," "step across," "pass over," "bestride," ​"decide," "come home to,"  ​and "affect."

ἔνθεν (adv) "From hence" is enteuthen, which means "from that place" and "hence." --

πρὸς (prep) "To" is pros, which means "on the side of," "in the direction of," "from (place)," "towards" "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "in the name of," "by reason of," "before (supplication)," "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable,""becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before." 

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." 

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. 

δύνωνται, (verb aor inf act) "Can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities," "to be able," and "to be strong enough." -

μηδὲ (partic) "Neither" is mede, which means "and not," "but not," "nor," and "not." --

ἐκεῖθεν (adv) "From thence" is from ekeithen, which means "from that place," "thence," "from that fact," and "thenceforward."​

πρὸς (prep) "For" is pros, which means "on the side of," "in the direction of," "from (place)," "towards" "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "in the name of," "by reason of," "before (supplication)," "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable,""becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before." 

ἡμᾶς (pro 1st pl acc) "Us" is hemon, which is the plural object form of the first-personal pronoun. 

διαπερῶσιν. [unique] (verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "They pass" is diaperaōwhich means to "go over," "go across," "pass through," "pierce," "traverse," "reach," and "arrive at a place." 

Front Page Date: 

Aug 30 2018