Luke 20:11 And again he sent another servant: and they beat him also,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And he agreed another to send, a servant, the ones, however, that person there beating and dishonoring, sent out empty.

KJV : 

Luke 20:11 And again he sent another servant: and they beat him also, and entreated him shamefully, and sent him away empty.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The other two versions of this verse in Matthew and Mark are very different as we have seen throughout this story. And all of the KJV have differed from the Greek in significant ways. There is something about this story that makes people want to rewrite it.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

προσέθετο ( verb 3rd sg aor ind mid ) "Again" is from prostithemi, which is formed from two root words that mean "to put towards" and means to "put to", "to hold close", "to apply medicine [to a wound]", "to hand over", "to give something more", "to impose upon", "to attribute to", "to add", "to agree", "to associate with", "to bring upon oneself," and "to apply to oneself."

ἕτερον ( adj sg masc acc ) "Another" is heteros, which means "one or the other of two", "the second", "the secondary", "the minor", "other things [of like kind]", "another", "different," "other than", "different from", "other than should be," and "in another or a different way." As an adverb, it means "in one or the other way", "differently", "otherwise than should be", "badly," and "wrongly."

πέμψαι ( verb aor inf act ) "He sent" is pempo, which means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort." -- "He sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort."

δοῦλον: (noun sg masc acc) "The servant" is doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave." -

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "They" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

κἀκεῖνον ( adj sg masc acc ) "Him" is ekeinos, which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner." --

δείραντες ( part pl aor act masc nom ) "Beat" is from dero, which means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash."

καὶ  (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἀτιμάσαντες[2 verses]( part pl aor act masc nom ) "Entreated ...shamefully" is from atimazo, which means "to hold in no honor", "to esteem lightly", "to treat as unworthy," and "to bring dishonor upon."

ἐξαπέστειλαν [uncommon]( verb 3rd pl aor ind act ) "Sent...away" is exapostellō, which means  to "dispatch", "send forth", "send away", and "dismiss."

κενόν. [uncommon]( adj sg masc acc ) "Empty" is from kenos (kenos), which means "empty", "fruitless", "void", "ineffectual", "to no purpose", "destitute", "empty-handed", "devoid of wit", "vain," and "pretentious."

KJV Analysis: 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

The Greek word translated as "again" means "to apply", "to deliver," "to impose upon," and many other meanings. In this context, it works a lot like the English "to hand over."  In the Mark and Matthew version, the standard Greek word for "again" is used and the KJV wanted to keep using it. The sense of this verb seems to be "agreed".

 "He sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort." The form is an infinitive, "to send" being introduced by the previous verb.

The word translated as "another" means "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun.

The noun translated as "servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The word translated as "they " is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek verb translated as "beat " means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash." Jesus seems to use it to mean being "flogged". It is an adjective here, "the ones...beating".

The word translated as "him" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." When applied to a person it means "that person there". It is not the common pronoun.

The Greek word translated as "also, and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). However, it only appears once, not twice.

"Entreated...shamefully" is an uncommon verb which means "to hold in no honor", "to esteem lightly", "to treat as unworthy," and "to bring dishonor upon."  It is in the form of an adjective as well, "dishonoring".

There is no "him" in this clause or the next.

There is no "and" here because there is  only one active verb, the next one.

"Sent...away" is the uncommon verb we saw in the previous verse that means  to "dispatch", "send forth", "send away", and "dismiss."

"Empty" is another uncommon word only seen earlier in the previous verse and its parallel verse in Mark. It means "empty", "fruitless", "void", "ineffectual", "to no purpose", "destitute", "empty-handed", "devoid of wit", "vain," and "pretentious." In the previous verse, it follows "beaten" the sense is "to no purpose". Here, it follows "sent away", which give it the sense of "empty".

Front Page Date: 

Dec 3 2018