Luke 20:47 Which devour widows' houses, and for a shew make long prayers:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The ones devouring the households of the bereaved! And for a purpose, long are they are made to pray  themselves, the ones, making themselves offer tedious prayers as a pretense! These [or you] ones giving/getting an excessive judgment!

KJV : 

Luke 20:47 Which devour widows' houses, and for a shew make long prayers: the same shall receive greater damnation.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In the parallel verse in Mark, there are no active verbs and it seems more like simply name calling.

Sometimes it seems the KJV translators want to make verses seem the same by translating different Greek words in the same way. In this verse, the word translated as "damnation" is frequently translated as "judgment" because Jesus doesn't always use it to mean condemnation. Other times, the KJV wants to make the same words in similar verses seem different by translating them differently. That is the case here with "shew" which isn't the word translated as "shew" elsewhere, but the word translated as "pretense" in the two parallel verses. Several uncommon words that are used mostly in the parallel verse in Matthew and Mark.

"Which" is from the article that proceeds the following verb that is used as a noun.

"Devour" is from a verb acting as a noun that means "to eat up" and "to devour." Christ uses this term as a humorous exaggeration because it refers to animals eating prey. It also means "to corrode" or "to be gnawed." It is no in the second person because this noun form has no "person." It should be translated as "the ones devouring."

The Greek word translated as "house," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

The word translated as "widows" more generally means "bereaved."

The Greek word translated as "for a shew" means "motive" or "pretense." It describes the purpose of the prayer. It is translated as "pretense" in the versions of this verse in other Gospels.

"Make...prayers" is from the only active verb in the verse. It means "to offer prayers or vows", "to worship," and "to pray for a thing." Again, this is not a active verb, but a noun introduced by an article ("the ones offering"). It is also in the form of a verb acting on itself, so "they are made themselves to offer prayers". In the other versions of this verse, this verb is also an adjective, but it is active here.

The Greek word translated as "long" means "long", "tall", "high", "deep", "tedious," etc. It is in the form of an adjective, but there is no noun that matches its form. However, the "prayers" is understood as part of the verb so "tedious" prayers.

There is no noun for "prayers," but it is understood as part of the verb.

There is no therefor in this source. There is a word that means "these" from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer." It is in the form of a subject of the sentence but it modifies the following verb

The word translated as "ye shall receive" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing."  The form is again of an adjective, but the form could be that of someone being addressed.

The word translated as "greater", it means "extraordinary" "superfluous," "excessive," and "extravagant." The word is an exaggeration.

The Greek word translated as "damnation" doesn't mean "damnation" but "judgment", "decision," and a "legal decision."

Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

οἳ (article pl masc nom)  "Which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

κατεσθίουσιν (part pl pres act masc nom) "Devour" is from katesthio, which means "to eat up" and "to devour." It is a term applied to animals of prey. It also means "to corrode" or "to be gnawed."

τὰς οἰκίας (noun pl fem acc) "Houses" is from oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household." It was also the term that was used to describe a family or clan and the people associated with that family or clan, such as their servants and slaves. -- The Greek word translated as "house," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

τῶν χηρῶν (noun pl masc gen) "Of widows" is from chera, which means "widow" and "bereaved."

καὶ (conj.adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

προφάσει [uncommon] (noun sg fem dat) "For a shew" is from prophasis, which means "motive", "alleged cause", "actual motive", "plea", "falsely alleged motive", "pretext", "pretense", "purpose", "cause", "persuasion," and "suggestion."

μακρὰ [uncommon](noun/adj pl neut acc) "Long" is from makros, which means in length, "long," in height, "tall", "high", "deep," in distance, "long", "far", "remote," generally, "large in size or degree", "great," of Time, "long," and "tedious." As a noun, it means "length." As an adverb, "lengthy."

προσεύχονται: ( verb 3rd pl pres ind mp ) "Make...prayers" is from proseuchomai (proseuchomai), which means "to offer prayers or vows", "to worship," and "to pray for a thing. It is the combination of two Greek word, pros, meaning "towards" or "by reason of," and euchomai, meaning "to pray to God."

οὗτοι (adj pl masc nom) "These" is from houtos, which means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why." -- "This" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer."

λήμψονται (part pl pres act masc nom) "Shall receive" is from lambano means to "take", "take hold of", "grasp", "seize", "catch", "overtake", "find out", "detect", "take as", "take [food or drugs]", "understand", "take in hand", "undertake", "take in", "hold", "get", "receive [things]", "receive hospitably", "receive in marriage", "receive as produce", "profit", "admit", "initiate", "take hold of", "lay hold on", "seize and keep hold of", "obtain possession of", "lay hands upon", "find fault with", "censure," "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean "seized with emotion." -- The word translated as "That they might receive" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing." It is again an adjective, "getting", "taking", or "receiving".

περισσότερον  (adj sg masc acc) "Greater" is perissoteros, which is a form of the word perissos, which means "beyond the regular number of size", "out of the common", "extraordinary" "more than sufficient", "superfluous", "useless", "excessive", "extravagant", "over-wise", "over-curious", "abundantly," and "remarkable."

κρίμα. (noun sg neut acc) "Damnation" is from krima, which means "decision", "judgment", "decree", "resolution," and a "legal decision."

Front Page Date: 

Dec 24 2018