Luke 20:9 A certain man planted a vineyard, and let it forth to husbandmen,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

A man planted a vineyard and and he gave it out to vine-dressers and he went abroad a substantial period.

KJV : 

Luke 20:9 A certain man planted a vineyard, and let it forth to husbandmen, and went into a far country for a long time.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This version is much shorter than the one in Matthew 21:33 and Mark 12:1 cutting out the specifics of the building process. The other two verses do not have the last phrase, "for a long time".

The Greek word for "a man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

The word translated as "certain" does not appear in the current Greek source. 

"Planted" is from a verb which means "to plant", "to produce", "to set-up," and specifically, "to plant with trees."

"A vineyard" is the Greek noun that means "vineyard."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word for "let it forth " is different in the KJV source and today's source (both are translated in the vocabulary above). The word in the KJV source makes more sense, meaning "give up" and "surrender" but has a number of other meanings including renting a house. The sources today show a word with one letter different. This may have been an alternative spelling ot the word appearing in the KJV . The current source shows a word that means "to eat" and "to devour." It is in a form which would mean "he is devoured by himself."

The word translated as "to husbandmen" means to those "tilling the ground," and from that, "vine dresser", "gardener," and "peasant." The "to" is from the form, which is that of an indirect object.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The verb translated as "went to a far country" the means "to be far from home" and "to go abroad." It is uncommon.  However, in the Luke version the Greek words for "into a far country" as used explicitly in the Greek, which maybe what this translation was inspired by, 

There is no Greek word "for". The "long time" is the object of the verb.

"Long" is from an adjective that means "sufficing", "becoming", "befitting", "competent to do", " capable", " sufficient", and "satisfactory". The English here might be "substantial".

"Time" is  a noun that means "time", "a definite period of time", "period",   and similar idease.

Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἄνθρωπος (noun masc sg nom) "A...man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἐφύτευσεν (3rd sg aor ind act) "Planted" is from phyteuo, which means "beget", "engender," generally, "produce", "bring about", "cause (mostly of evils), "implant in," "to plant (especially trees)", "to set-up," and specifically, "to plant with trees." When used as a noun, means "father" or, in plural, "parents."

ἀμπελῶνα,” (noun sg masc acc) "Vineyard" is from ampelon which means simply "vineyard."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐξέδετο (verb 3rd sg imperf ind mp) "Let" is from edo, which means "to eat," and, metaphorically, to "eat up," and "devour" as we might say, "he devoured the book" or he was "eating himself up."

(KJV Textus Receptus: ἐξέδοτο (verb 3rd sg aor ind) "Let" is from ekdidomi, which means literally, "to give out," generally, "give up," "surrender", "give out of one's house", "give one's daughter in marriage", "farm out", "let for hire", "give in charge to another", "lend out money on security," "hand over, and "deliver a document.")

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "It" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

γεωργοῖς, (adj pl masc dat) "Husbandmen" is from georgos, which means "tilling the ground," and from that, "husbandman", "vine dresser", "gardener," and "peasant."

καὶ (conj/adv) And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

ἀπεδήμησεν [uncommon] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Went to a far country" is from apodemeo, which means "to be far from home", "to be abroad", "to be on one's travels," and "to go abroad."

χρόνους ( noun pl masc acc ) "Time" is chronos, which means "time", "a definite period of time", "period", "date", "term", "lifetime", "age", "season", "delay," and "tense."

ἱκανούς. [uncommon]( adj pl masc acc) "Long" is hikanos, which means "sufficing", "becoming", "befitting", "competent to do", " capable", " sufficient", and "satisfactory".

Front Page Date: 

Dec 1 2018