Luke 21:35 For as a snare shall it come on all them that dwell

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

This is going come suddenly, consequently, upon all those sitting themselves (as judges) upon a facade of all of this planet.

KJV : 

Luke 21:35 For as a snare shall it come on all them that dwell on the face of the whole earth.

What is Lost in Translation: 

This verse seems to be more about those the threat to those in power than to everyone. The KJV of this verse includes two word that clearly belong to Luke 21:34. We can know this for sure because the second word here is a Greek word that always appears in the second position in a sentence. Since it appears in the second position in this Greek, it means the the first two word of the KJV are part of the last verse, not this one. However, we will analyze the vocabulary of the entire KJV here.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

The Greek words from the end of the previous verse, Luke 21:34:

ὡς (adv/conj) "For as" is hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." --

παγίς:” [unique]( noun sg fem nom ) "A snare" is pagis, which means "trap" and, metaphorically, "snare".

The Greek from this verse starts here.

ἐπεισελεύσεται  [ 4 verses]( verb 3rd sg fut ind mid ) "Shall come upon him" is from eperchomai, which means "come upon", "approach", "come suddenly upon", in a hostile sense "come against", "attack", "come forward to speak", "proceed against", "come upon", of time "come on", "go over" [a space], and "traverse".  --

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." --

ἐπὶ” (prep) "on" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against." --

πάντας ( adj pl masc acc ) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

τοὺς καθημένους (part pl perf mid masc acc ) "Them that dwell" is from kathemai, which means to "be seated", "sit," especially of courts, councils, assemblies, etc., (as a noun) "the judges", "the court,", "sit still", "sit quiet", "lead a sedentary", "obscure life," and, of things, "to be set or placed." --

ἐπὶ” (prep) "Against" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against." --

πρόσωπον ( noun sg neut acc ) "Face" is prosopon, which means "face", "countenance." "in front", "facing", "front", "façade", "one's look", "dramatic part", "character", "in person", "in bodily presence", "legal personality", "person," and "feature [of the city, of a person]."

πάσης ( adj sg fem gen ) "Of the whole" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." --

τῆς γῆς.” ( noun sg fem gen ) "Earth" is ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet. --

KJV Analysis: 

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause".  This word appears in the Greek after the verb translated as "shall it come upon" so that verb is the beginning of the sentence.

The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words. This word describes the "unforeseen day" in that verse.

"A snare" is a unique word for Jesus to use. It means "trap" and, metaphorically, "snare". It appears in the previous verse which is full of unique words.

"Shall it come on" is a Greek verb which means "come upon", "approach", and, in a hostile sense "come against", "attack". The root word is the word usually translated as "come". The sense is obviously hostile, "come against" but there is no "him" here. The form is an adjective, "attacking". This is an uncommon word for Jesus, used only two other places. It is another word that only appears in Luke. The "it" here refers to the day, which is a trap, described in the previous verse.

The word translated as "on" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on." This word is repeated because it appears in the prefix of the verb above. It is repeated for emphasis.

The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything."

The Greek word translated as "them that dwell"" means to "sit," especially of courts, councils, assemblies, etc. As a noun, which is how it is used here, it means "the judge," or "the court."  Jesus seems to use this word exclusively to refer to sitting in judgment of others. This is not the Greek word usually translated as "dwell".

The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on." This is the third repetition of the word.

"Face" is the Greek word that means "face", "countenance." "in front", "facing", "front", "facade", "one's look", "dramatic part", "character", "in person", "in bodily presence", "legal personality", "person," and "feature [of the city, of a person]."  Jesus uses it to refer to facing power or the appearance of power.

"Of" comes from the form of the next two words.

The word translated as "the whole" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." Though this word means "whole", Jesus usually uses a different Greek word for that concept. He usually uses this word to mean "all".

The word translated as "earth" means "ground" and "dirt". Translated as "earth", it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Christ describes using a different Greek word. This word is usually translated as "the earth" not "the world". See this article for more on these words. 

Front Page Date: 

Jan 23 2019