Luke 21:8 Take heed that ye be not deceived:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Look out! You don't want to be lead astray. Many, as a cause, are going to show up  on that name of mine saying "I exist," and the time has drawn near. You don't want to be marched behind them.

KJV : 

Luke 21:8 Take heed that ye be not deceived: for many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and the time draweth near: go ye not therefore after them.

What is Lost in Translation: 

The verb translated as "take heed" means "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to beware," and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English or in a warning like this, "watch out."

There is no "that" in the Greek.

The negative used, "not," here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. To capture the sense of this negative in English, we have to insert a verbal phrase that changes the form of the English verb from the Greek.

"Ye be not deceived" is from a verb that means "to cause to wander," "to lead astray," "to mislead," "to wander," "to stray," and "to be misled." The form indicates something that "might" or "possibly happens and it is passive, "might be led astray."

The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, to prevent a run-on sentence, translated as a "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Christ, however, uses it most often, but not always, in the sense of "come." It is in the future tense.

The word translated as "in" means "against," "before," "by" or "on." It is NOT the word Christ usually uses with the Greek phrase usually translated "in" someone's name, for example, Matthew 23:39. for "in the name of the Lord." That Greek word has the sense of "in the power of." This word does not have the same sense, not is it the other Greek word commonly translated as "in" that means "within." "Against" seems to be the only meaning here that makes sense.

"My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. 

The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss" or, in this case, "against the name."

The word translated as "saying" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. However. it also means "to proclaim," which is how it usually works best when Christ puts it in the mouth of his opponent.

The pronoun "I" is added to add emphasis that he is referring to his own words. It is unnecessary because the first person is part of the verb ending. Christ sometimes uses it humorously to refer to himself. However, when you put the accent on "I" when you speak this phrase, it makes the statement sound like a claim his opponents are saying about themselves, not about Christ.

The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek in the first person, present form.

There is no "Christ" in this verse. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"The time" is a noun that means "due measure," "season," "opportunity," "time," and "profit."

-- The word translated as "draweth near " is the verb form of an adverb "near" in space, time, and relationships. In English, we would say "nears" or, in the form here, "has neared," doesn't quite work so perhaps "has gotten close" or, in the case of time, "is nearly here."

The Greek verb translated as "go ye" is the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT.  This word means "to lead over," "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." Since it is in a form s passive, "be lead."

The term translated as "after" means "back," "after," and "behind" in space, but "forward" in time. The logic regarding time is that, since the future is unseen, it should be regarded as behind us, whereas the past is known and therefore before our eyes. This seems quite strange to English speakers, but the use of this word in Greek is well-established to mean "future." Our English view coincides with the ancient Greek when discussing books. The "back" of the book in English means the "end" of the book, which is the future for the reader. This use of "back" is identical to the Greek. 

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Βλέπετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act or verb 2nd pl pres/imperf ind act ) "Seeth" is from of blepo, which means "to look," "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to rely on," "to look longingly," "to propose," "to beware," "to behold," and "to look for." --

μή "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

πλανηθῆτε: (verb 2nd pl aor subj pass) "Ye be...deceived" is from planao which means "to cause to wander," "to lead astray," "to mislead," "to wander," "to stray," and "to be misled."

πολλοὶ (adj pl masc nom) "Many" is from polus, which means "many (in number)," "great (in size or power or worth)," and "large (of space)." As an adverb, it means "far," "very much," "a great way," and "long."

γὰρ "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ἐλεύσονται (verb 3rd pl fut ind) "Shall come" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ἐπὶ "In" is from epi. which means "on," "upon," "at," "by," "before," "across," and "against."

τῷ ὀνόματί (noun sg neut dat) "Name" is from onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative.

μου (noun sg masc gen) "Me" is from emou, which means "me," and "mine."

λέγοντες (part pl pres act masc nom) "Saying" is from lego, which means "to recount," "to tell over," "to say," "to speak," "to teach," "to mean," "boast of," "tell of," "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself," "pick up," "gather," "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay," "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

Ἐγώ (pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I." It also means "I at least," "for my part," "indeed," and "for myself."

εἰμι (pron 1st sg masc nom) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," and "is possible." -

καί (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

καιρὸς ( noun sg masc nom ) "The time" is kairos, which means "due measure," "proportion," "fitness," "exact time," "season," "opportunity," "time," "critical times," "advantage," and "profit."

ἤγγικεν: (verb sg perf ind act) "Draweth near" is eggizo, which means "to bring near," "to join one things to another," to draw near," and "to approach." This word does not appear in the Perseus dictionary. It comes from an adverb ἐγγύς, keggus, which means 1) (of place) "near," "nigh," "at hand," 2) (of time) "nigh at hand" 3) (of numbers) "nearly," "almost," "coming near," and 4) (of relationship) "akin to."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

πορευθῆτε (verb 2nd pl aor subj pass) "Go ye" is poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go," "carry," "convey," "bring," "go," "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT. --

ὀπίσω (adv) "After" is from opiso, which means "back," "behind," and "hereafter." -- 

αὐτῶν. (adj pl masc gen) "Them"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- 

Front Page Date: 

Dec 28 2018