Luke 6:44 For every tree is known by his own fruit.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because every tree out of its distinct fruit is recognized. Because not out of thorns do they collect figs, out of brambles grapes do they pick.  

KJV : 

Luke 6:44 For every tree is known by his own fruit. For of thorns men do not gather figs, nor of a bramble bush gather they grapes.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The Greek word that means "because" begins both phrases, indicating they are answers to an unrecorded question. Tow very different Greek verbs are translated as "gather."  The difference between the last part of this verse and Matthew 7:16 is interesting because the Matthew verse was a reference to Genesis, Gen 3:18, and the Greek words used in translating it in the Septuagint (the Greek OT). There are sings 

The Greek word translated as "every"  means "each," "all and each severally," and "each by himself."

The word for "tree" most commonly means fruit-bearing trees. The tree was a symbol for the naturally productive assets of nature as opposed to fields which must be planted each year.

The Greek preposition translated as "by" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

The word translated as "his own" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own," "distinct" and "private."

The word translated as "fruit" primary meaning is "fruit," "seed," or "offspring," but its secondary meaning is "returns," specifically, "profit," as we would say "fruit of our labors."

"Is known" is a verb that means "to know," "to recognize," "make known," "to know carnally," and "to learn.

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."

The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

The Greek words translated as "thorns"  means any type of thorny plant. This is the same word used in the Matthew version. 

There is no word for "men" in this verse. 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

The Greek verb translated as "do men gather" specifically means collecting something for use. The word means a selective choosing rather than an indiscriminate gathering as in the selection of ripe grapes and figs from a tree or vine. The form is "do they gather." 

"Figs" are from the Greek word meaning the "fruit of the fig tree." It is another word for "tumors" and a woman's sex order.

The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

The word translated as "bramble bush" means "bramble bush" and "blackberry bush." Others words, spelled the same means "fish" and "blackberry," but those words have a different gender but there is no indication of gender here. This is a different word than the one used in Matthew, and seems less fitting since it refers to a fruit bush. 

The word translated here as "gather" is a verb used uniquely here that means to "gather fruit" or, as we say in English, "picking fruit."  This word begins like the word used in  Matthew for "thistle." 

The Greek word translated as "grapes" means "a bunch of grapes." Grapes were generally symbolic of fertility in most cultures but, among the Jews, also of humility between of the similarity between the Hebrew words for them.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἕκαστον [unusual](adj sg masc acc) "Every" is from hekastos, which means "each," "all and each severally," and "each by himself."

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

δένδρον (noun sg neut nom)"Tree" is dendron (more commonly spelled dendreon), which means "tree," "fruit-tree," "tall plants (such as rattan)" "stick," and "timber."

ἐκ (prep)"By" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from." --

τοῦ ἰδίου (adj sg masc acc) "His own" is idios, which means "one's own," "pertaining to oneself," "private," "personal," "personally attached" to one, "separate," "distinct," "strange," and "unusual." 

καρποῦ (noun sg masc gen)"Fruit" is karpos, which means "fruit," "the fruits of the earth," "seed," "offspring," "returns for profit," and "reward." 

γινώσκεται:  (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Is known" is ginosko which means "to learn to know," "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive." -

 οὐ (partic)"Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."

ἐξ (prep) "Of" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from." 

ἀκανθῶν (noun pl fem gen) "Thorns" is from akantha, which means "thorn," "prickle," or "any thorny or prickly plant." It is also a metaphor for a "thorny" question.

συλλέγουσιν [8 verses](3rd pl pres ind act)"Do men gather" is from sylego, a term meaning "gather," "collect," "come together," "collect," "get together [people]," "compose," "compile," "scrape together," and "compile a list of."

σῦκα, (noun pl neut acc) "Figs" is from sykon, which means "fruit of the fig," "large wart on the eyelids," "tumors," and "a woman's sex organ."

οὐδὲ (adv/conj) "Neither" is oude, which, as a conjunction, means "but not," "neither," and "nor." 

ἐκ "By" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from." 

βάτου (noun sg fem gen) "Bush" is from batos, which means "bramble." Greek words spelled the same also mean "blackberry" and "fish." 

σταφυλὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Grapes" is from staphylewhich means "bunch of grapes," "of ripe, fresh grapes," "uvula when swollen," and "plumb of a level."

τρυγῶσιν. [unique](verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "Gather they" is from trygao, which means "gather in," "gather fruit," and, metaphorically, "to strip people." 

Front Page Date: 

Oct 18 2017