Luke 6:45 A good man out of the good treasure of his heart

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The worthy man out of the worthwhile store of the heart brings out the worthwhile and the worthless out of the worthless brings out the worthless. Because out of the abundance of the heart, it chatters, that heart of his. 

KJV : 

Luke 6:45 A good man out of the good treasure of his heart bringeth forth that which is good; and an evil man out of the evil treasure of his heart bringeth forth that which is evil: for of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaketh.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

 This verse brings together the idea in Matthew 12:35  and Matthew 15:18. The Greek here is more different from Matthew 12:35 than it seems in translation. The second phrase is especially pithy in the Greek: "the worthless from the worthless brings out the worthless." Much funnier as a punch line.  The Greek of Matthew 15:18 is very similar, but the context is completely different. economic and broader implications of this verse are hidden in its translation in terms of "good" and "evil". Read this article that discusses the Greek meaning of the key terms here. 

The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

The Greek word for "man" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular.

The Greek preposition translated as "out of" means "out of" or "from." 

The "good" here is the same word as above, meaning "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality.

The word translated as "treasure" means a "store" of something and its secondary meaning is valuables. "Also meaning a "strong room", "a granary", "a safe," or "a cavern." It is not the valuables themselves, but the place where they are kept, and the basis for our word, "thesaurus."

"Of his heart" is the Greek word that means "heart" both the physical organ and as the seat of emotions, which we discuss in a larger Greek context in this article here. There is no "his" here, but the article, so "the heart". 

"Brings forth" is a Greek verb that means "bring out", "present" and display". It is not the same verb translated as "brings forth in Matthew 12:35 or Luke 6:43. The verbs used in those verses mean "tosses out" and "produces". 

The "that which is good" here is the same word as above, meaning "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. It is in the singular and used with an article so  "the worthwhile". 

 The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

The Greek word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores it meaning in more detail. 

There is no "man" in the Greek. 

The Greek preposition translated as "out of" means "out of" or "from."

The Greek word translated as "evil" is the same as above. It means "second-rate" or "worthless." 

There is no "treasure" in the Greek. 

There is no "of his heart" in the Greek. 

"Brings forth" is again the word that means "brings out" or "display." 

The Greek word translated as "that which is evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." It is an adjective, but here it is used as a singular with an article so "the worthless". 

The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

"Abundance" is an adjective used as a noun which means "superfluidity", "that which remains over," and "abundant."

"Heart" is the noun that means the physical heart and, in Greek, the seat of feelings, especially feelings that motivate action.

"Mouth" is the Greek word that means "mouth" and "the foremost part" of something. For example, the blade of a weapon is the same Greek word.

"Speaketh" is again from the verb used in describing "chatter" but here it is in a tense describing something begun in the past but not yet completed.

Wordplay: 

The second phrase uses the same word three times in three different ways: as subject, object, and object of a preposition:  "the worthless from the worthless brings out the worthless."

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀγαθὸς (adj sg masc nom) "Good " is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial."

ἄνθρωπος  (noun sg masc nom) "Man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -

ἐκ  (prep) "Out of " is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τοῦ ἀγαθοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "Good " is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial."

θησαυροῦ  (noun sg masc gen) "Treasure" is from thesauros, which means a "store", "treasure", "strong-room", "magazine, "granary", "receptacle for valuables", "safe", "casket", "offertory-box", "cavern," and "subterranean dungeon."

τῆς καρδίας (noun sg fem gen)"Of heart" is kardia, which means "heart (the physical organ)", "the seat of emotions (especially passion, rage, and anger)", "inclination", "desire," "purpose", "mind", "the pith (in wood), and "the deep (of the sea)."

προφέρει [unique](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Bringeth forth" is from prophero, which means "bring before", "present", "bring forward", "cite",  "display",  "bring out",  "put or move forward",  "surpass", "excel", "bring forth children" , and "carry before".

τὸ ἀγαθόν, (adj sg neut acc) "the which is good" is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πονηρὸς (adj sg masc nom) "Evil" is from poneros, which we discuss extensively in this page. In a moral sense, it means "worthless", "base," and "cowardly."

ἐκ (prep) "Out of " is from ekwhich means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τοῦ πονηροῦ (adj sg masc gen) "Evil" is from poneros, which we discuss extensively in this page. In a moral sense, it means "worthless", "base," and "cowardly."

προφέρει  [unique](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Bringeth forth" is from prophero, which means "bring before", "present", "bring forward", "cite",  "display",  "bring out",  "put or move forward",  "surpass", "excel", "bring forth children" , and "carry before".

τὸ πονηρόν: (adj sg neut acc) "Evil" is from poneros, which we discuss extensively in this page. In a moral sense, it means "worthless", "base," and "cowardly."

ἐκ "Out of " is from ekwhich means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

γὰρ "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."

περισσεύματος (noun sg neut gen) "The abundance" is from perisseuma, which means "superfluidity", "that which remains over," and "abundance." It is from the root, perissos , which means "exceeding some measure or rank."

καρδίας (noun sg fem gen)"Of heart" is kardia, which means "heart (the physical organ)", "the seat of emotions (especially passion, rage, and anger)", "inclination", "desire," "purpose", "mind", "the pith (in wood), and "the deep (of the sea)."

λαλεῖ (verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "Speaketh" is laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle", "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech. 

τὸ στόμα (noun sg neut nom)"Mouth" is stoma, which means "mouth" and therefore, "speech" or "utterance." In English, we say someone has a "foul mouth" when we mean they use bad language. The Greek use to mean speech was a little more direct.

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

Front Page Date: 

Oct 19 2017