Luke 6:48 He is like a man which built an house,

Spoken to: 

audience

Jesus is teaching in the plain of Judea, attracting people from all over wanting to be healed.

KJV: 

Luke 6:48 He is like a man which built an house, and digged deep, and laid the foundation on a rock: and when the flood arose, the stream beat vehemently upon that house, and could not shake it: for it was founded upon a rock.

NIV : 

Luke 6:48 They are like a man building a house, who dug down deep and laid the foundation on rock. When a flood came, the torrent struck that house but could not shake it, because it was well built.

LISTENERS HEARD: 

He is like a man constructing a house who dug and deepened and placed a foundation on the rock. While a flood tide, however, happened, a stream dashed on the house there and was not strong to rock it thanks to it being well-constucted.

MY TAKE: 

We cannot be rocked when built on a rock.

GREEK (Each Word Explained Bottom of Page): 

GREEK ORDER: 

ὅμοιός ἐστιν     ἀνθρώπῳ οἰκοδομοῦντι    οἰκίαν ὃς    ἔσκαψεν καὶ ἐβάθυνεν
like      He is  a man          constructing   a house who dug        and  deepened

καὶ  ἔθηκεν     θεμέλιον    ἐπὶ τὴν  πέτραν:   πλημμύρης δὲ            γενομένης
and placed   a foundation on  the  rock.      a  flood tide, however, happens.

προσέρηξεν ποταμὸς     τῇ     οἰκίᾳ  ἐκείνῃ, καὶ οὐκ ἴσχυσεν      σαλεῦσαι αὐτὴν
dashes           A stream  on the house there    and not   it is strong to rock    it

διὰ       τὸ καλῶς οἰκοδομῆσθαι      αὐτήν.
thanks to  well   being constucting it

LOST IN TRANSLATION: 

This was a hard one. No wonder Biblical translators get so much wrong. At least they knew what most of the words mean. They often changed theirs form and meaning. The "deep" is not an adjective, but a verb.

There are two unusual constructions here.  The Biblical translators recognized. It is from a special word construction that indicates things happening at the same time as the following clause. They introduce the clause with a when, but a "while" or "during" is more accurate. The literal meaning is "a flood happening," but we translated it as "while a flood happened." They translated the "happen" as  "arose" and "came."

The last part is another special construction that Biblical translators doesn't seem to understand. The final verbis an infinitive, but it is introduced by a definite article, making it act like a noun describing the verb action, "being well constructed."  The KJV had a completely different ending in their Greek source. More accurately translated, this reads much smoother than the Biblical versions.

# KJV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

16
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word doesn't exist in the source.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word  doesn't appear here but after the next verb.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, ending with "-ing. "
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This word is an active verb not an adjective.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "who" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This word's transition is more specific than the word's more general meaning.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be something more like "the."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word"but" is not shown in the English translation
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "arose" should be something more like "happened."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- The "that" is not the common word usually translated as "here" or "there."
  •  MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "house" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the common verb form usually translated as "could."
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not a helping verb but a helping verb, but the active verb.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This "shake" is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, ending with "-ing. " 
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "for it was founded upon a rock" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the source we use today.

# NIV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

17
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This word is an active verb not an adjective.
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This word's transition is more specific than the word's more general meaning.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "came" should be something more like "happened."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- The "that" is not the common word usually translated as "here" or "there."
  •  MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "house" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "but" should be something more like "and."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the common verb form usually translated as "could."
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not a helping verb but a helping verb, but the active verb.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This "shake" is not active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, ending with "-ing. " 
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the common verb form usually translated as "because."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before the infinitive creating a noun is not shown in the English translation."
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not a helping verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, ending with "-ing. " 
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but an infinitive, acting like a gerund, a verbal noun, ending with "-ing. " 

EACH WORD of KJV : 

 He -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  The word also means "to exist" and where it doesn't connect to characteristics or conditions.

like -- The word translated as "like" is an adjective that means "like," "resembling," and "matching."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

man -- The Greek word for "man" means "man," "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men," "people," and "peoples." 

which -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

built -- - (WF) "Built" is a word that specifically means "build a house," generally, "build," "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." The English word "construct" may come closest.

an -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

house, - The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all property owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. The male form of the word means also means "ruling family"  or "clan." However, it also refers to the physcial building that is built. So, "home" in the former sense and "house" in the later.

missing "who"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun, "he," "she," "it," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

and  -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

digged   -- (WF) The verb translated as "digged" means to "dig", "delve" and "cultivate by digging."

deep,  - (WF) "Deep" is from  a verb that means to "deepen", "hollow out", and metaph., "go deeply into a subject". This word is an active verb not an adjective.

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

laid  -- (CW) The Greek verb translated as "laid" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "to put," "to dedicate," "to assign," "to award," and "to place," and in the military, "to bear arms," "to lay down and surrender," but which has many related meanings as well. This translation is more specific than the word's meaning.

the -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

foundation - The word translated as "foundation" is not a noun, but an adjective, meaning "of or for the foundation" and "foundational". The sense here is "for the foundation. 

on -- The word translated as "on" means "on," "over," "upon," "for,"  "against," "before," "after," "during," "by" "in the case of."

a   -- (WW) The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun. Without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

rock: -- "Rock" is a noun that means "rock," "boulder," and "stone" as a building material. It has the specific meaning of "rocky cliffs" or "ledges" over the sea and a "rocky peak" or "ridge."

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

when -- This is from a special word construction that indicates things happening at the same time as the following clause. A "while" or "during" is more accurate.

the -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as this phrase in the Greek source.

flood - The word translated as "flood" specifically means "food tide".  It is only used here in the NT. This may represent that this presentation was made on or near the sea coast by Tyre and Sidon.  It is not technically the subject of the sentence here. The form is a special use of the possessive case with a verb used as an adjective (subjective genitive). 

missing "but"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so").  When used with a conditional starting a clause, the sense is "if/when...then." When used with a particle meaning "indeed" the sense is "on one hand...on the other hand." In a listing, the sense is "then" or "yet." After an interruption, "so then."

arose,  -- (WW) The word translated as "arose" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen," "to occur," or "take place." For things, it can be "to be produced." When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something. The form of the verb's object can indicate the time or to whom it "happens." This is not the specific meaning of the word in this situation.

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun. Without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

stream - The word translated as "stream" means a "river," and similar existing bodies of water.

beat vehemently  - The Greek word translated as "beat vehemently" means to "dash", "beat against", or "burst".

upon -- This word "upon" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context.

that (CW) The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." So it means "there," "here," or "then." Used a pronoun, the sense is "that one there" or "this one here." Used in the form of an adverb,  it means "in that case," "in that way," "at that place," and "in that manner."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

house, -- The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all property owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. The male form of the word means "house" and so on, but it also means "ruling family" so perhaps "house" works better for that version and "home," "estate," or "household" works better for this word.

and    -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

could -- (CW, WF) The word translated as "could " is a verb that means "to be strong", "to be able," or "to have powerful." It is the present plural participle of verb, used as the sentence's subject. This is not the verb form usually translated as this word.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

shake (WF) Shaken" is a Greek verb that means "to cause to rock," "to make vibrate," "to be shaken," "to waver," "to totter," "to move up and down," "to roll," and "to toss." This is an infinitive, not an active verb.

it: -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context. When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same." As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

for it was founded upon a rock. -- (OS) There is nothing in the Greek that can be translated as "for it was founded upon a rock." in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

missing "By means of"  --  (OS) The preposition translated as "By means of" means with the accusative used here, means "thanks to," "because of,"  "by reasons of," and "for the sake of."

missing "this"  -- (OS)The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek untranslated words (s) exist in the source we use today, but not the KJV Greek source.

missing "he"  -- (OS) The untranslated word specifically means "build a house," generally, "build," "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." The English word "construct" may come closest.

missing "to construct for himself"  -- (OS) The untranslated word "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context. When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same." As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement. The form is either passive or the middle voice, someone doing something for themselves.

missing "well "  -- (OS) The untranslated word "well" means, "well," "rightly,"  "happily,"  "thoroughly," "altogether," and "deservedly." 

EACH WORD of NIV : 

They -- (WN) -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb. This word is not plural but singular. WN  --Wrong Number- The word "believe" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.

are -- (WN) The verb "are " here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  The word also means "to exist" and where it doesn't connect to characteristics or conditions. This word is not plural but singular. WN  --Wrong Number- The word "believe" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.

like -- The word translated as "like" is an adjective that means "like," "resembling," and "matching."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

man -- The Greek word for "man" means "man," "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men," "people," and "peoples."

building -- - "building is a word that specifically means "build a house," generally, "build," "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." The English word "construct" may come closest.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

house, - The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all property owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. The male form of the word means also means "ruling family"  or "clan." However, it also refers to the physcial building that is built. So, "home" in the former sense and "house" in the later.

who  --  The word  "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun, "he," "she," "it," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

and  -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

dug -- (WF) The verb translated as "digged" means to "dig", "delve" and "cultivate by digging."

deep,  - (WF) "Deep" is from  a verb that means to "deepen", "hollow out", and metaph., "go deeply into a subject". This word is an active verb not an adjective.

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

laid  -- (CW) The Greek verb translated as "laid" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "to put," "to dedicate," "to assign," "to award," and "to place," and in the military, "to bear arms," "to lay down and surrender," but which has many related meanings as well. This translation is more specific than the word's meaning.

the -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

foundation - The word translated as "foundation" is not a noun, but an adjective, meaning "of or for the foundation" and "foundational". The sense here is "for the foundation. 

on -- The word translated as "on" means "on," "over," "upon," "for,"  "against," "before," "after," "during," "by" "in the case of."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun. Without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

rock: -- "Rock" is a noun that means "rock," "boulder," and "stone" as a building material. It has the specific meaning of "rocky cliffs" or "ledges" over the sea and a "rocky peak" or "ridge."

missing "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

When -- This is from a special word construction that indicates things happening at the same time as the following clause. A "while" or "during" is more accurate.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

flood - The word translated as "flood" specifically means "food tide".  It is only used here in the NT. This may represent that this presentation was made on or near the sea coast by Tyre and Sidon.  It is not technically the subject of the sentence here. The form is a special use of the possessive case with a verb used as an adjective (subjective genitive). 

missing "but"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "but" means "but," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It can also be an explanation of cause ("so").  When used with a conditional starting a clause, the sense is "if/when...then." When used with a particle meaning "indeed" the sense is "on one hand...on the other hand." In a listing, the sense is "then" or "yet." After an interruption, "so then."

came,  -- (WW) The word translated as "came" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. When applied to events, this word means "to happen," "to occur," or "take place." For things, it can be "to be produced." When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something. The form of the verb's object can indicate the time or to whom it "happens." This is not the specific meaning of the word in this situation.

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun. Without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

torrent - The word translated as "floods" means a "river," and similar existing bodies of water.

struck   - The Greek word translated as "struck " means to "dash", "beat against", or "burst".

upon -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context.

that (CW) The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." So it means "there," "here," or "then." Used a pronoun, the sense is "that one there" or "this one here." Used in the form of an adverb,  it means "in that case," "in that way," "at that place," and "in that manner."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

house, -- The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all property owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. The male form of the word means "house" and so on, but it also means "ruling family" so perhaps "house" works better for that version and "home," "estate," or "household" works better for this word.

but --(WW) The Greek word translated as "but" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."  This doesn't belong here but after the next verb.

could -- (CW, WF) The word translated as "could " is a verb that means "to be strong", "to be able," or "to have powerful." It is the present plural participle of verb, used as the sentence's subject. This is not the verb form usually translated as this word.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

shake (WF)  "Shaken" is a Greek verb that means "to cause to rock," "to make vibrate," "to be shaken," "to waver," "to totter," "to move up and down," "to roll," and "to toss." This is not an active verb but a participle.

it: -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context. When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same." As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

because -- (CW) "Because" is from a preposition that means with the accusative used here,  "thanks to," "because of,"  "by reasons of," and "for the sake of." 

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Before an adjective, participle, or infinitive it changes the following word to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more. 

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

was -- (WT, WF) This helping verb "was" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

well --  The word "well" means, "well," "rightly,"  "happily,"  "thoroughly," "altogether," and "deservedly." 

built. -- The word specifically means "build a house," generally, "build," "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." The English word "construct" may come closest.

COMPARISON: GREEK to KJV : 

ὅμοιός [29 verses](adj sg masc nom) "Like" is homoios, which means "like," "resembling," "the same," "equal in force, "a match for one," "suiting," "of the same rank," "alike," "in like manner," and "equally."

ἐστίν.[614 verses](3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen,"  and "is possible." With the genitive object, it means "is descended from," "is the type of," "belongs to," "is made of," "is a duty of," "is at the mercy of," or " is dependent on."  With the object, the object acts like a possessive and "it is to him" becomes "it is his."  With the preposition,"into"(εἰς), the sense is "consist of." When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

ἀνθρώπῳ [209 verses](noun sg masc dat) "A man"  is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

οἰκοδομοῦντι [18 verses](part sg pres act masc dat) "Built" is oikodomeo,which means to "build a house," generally, "build," "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." -

οἰκίαν [40 times](noun sg fem acc) "House" is oikia, which means "house," "building," and "household."

ὃς [294 verses](167 verses](pron sg masc nom) Untranslated is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "it," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἔσκαψεν [3 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Digged" is from skapto, which means "dig", "delve", " dig about", and "cultivate by digging". 

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἐβάθυνεν [1 verse](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Deep" is from bathyo, which means to "deepen", "hollow out", and metaph., "go deeply into a subject".  The "deep" here is also a verb. It means to "deepen", "hollow out", and metaph., "go deeply into a subject."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

ἔθηκεν [24 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Laid" is tithemi which means "to put," "to place," "to propose," "to suggest," "o deposit," "to set up," "to dedicate," "to assign," "to award," "to agree upon," "to institute," "to establish," "to make," "to work," "to prepare oneself," "to bear arms [military]," "to lay down and surrender [military]," "to lay in the grave," "to bury," and "to put words on paper [writing]," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind."

θεμέλιον [3 verses](adj sg masc acc) "Foundation" is from themelios, which means" of or for the foundation", "foundational",  and "foundation-stone". These ideas are used metaphorically as well.

ἐπὶ [138 verses](prep) "On" is from epi which means "on," "upon," "at," "by," "before," "across," and "against." With a noun in the possessive, genitive, it means "upon," "on" but not necessarily of Place, "by (of persons)," "deep (with numbers)," "in the presence of," "towards," "in the time of," and "over (referring to a person of authority)." With a noun indirect object, dative, it means of place: "upon," "on," or "over," of people: "against (in a hostile sense)," regarding a situation: "towards" or "in reference to," of an accumulation: "upon," "after," "addition to," and "besides," of position: "after," "behind," "in dependence upon," and "in the power of," of time: "by," and "after," and. in a causal sense: "of the occasion or cause," "for" a person, an end, or purpose," "on condition that," and "for" (a price).  With the objective noun, an accusative, it means of place: "upon or on to a height," "up to," "as far as," "a little way," "a little," "towards," "to," in hostile sense: "against," of extension: "over," "over (a space)," of time: "for," "during," "up to" or "till," in a causal sense: "of (the object)," for (this purpose)," "as regards," "according to," and "by (this cause)." With verbs of perceiving, observing, and judging, it means "in the case of."

τὴν [821 verses](article sg femacc)  "A" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Proper nouns do normally not take articles but they are needed when the noun ending cannot be changed to show the noun's role in the sentence as an object, indirect object, or genitive (possessive) form. However, the Greek article is very close to "this" so the purpose of an article like this can also be demonstrative. See this article.

πέτραν [8 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Rock" is from petra, which means "rock," "boulder," and "stone" as a building material. It has the specific meaning of "rocky cliffs" or "ledges" over the sea and a "rocky peak" or "ridge."  -- "Rock" is a noun that means "rock," "boulder," and "stone" as a building material. It has the specific meaning of "rocky cliffs" or "ledges" over the sea and a "rocky peak" or "ridge."

πλημμύρης [1 verse](noun sg fem gen) "Flood" is from plemmyra, which means "flood-tide".   - The word translated as "the flood" specifically means "food tide".  It is only used here in the NT. This may represent that this presentation was made on or near the sea coast by Tyre and Sidon.  It is not technically the subject of the sentence here. The form is a special use of the possessive case with a verb used as an adjective (subjective genitive).

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "onthe other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be an explanation of indirect cause ("so"). In an  "if" (εἰ ) clause or temporal "when" (ὅταν) clause the sense is "if/when... then." In a series begun by men, its means "on the other hand." In a listing, the sense is "then" or "yet." After an interruption, "so then."

γενομένης [117 verses](part sg aor mid fem gen ) "Arose" is ginomai, which means "to become," "to come into being," "to happen," of things "to be produced," of events "happen," (passive) "take place," "come to pass," "to be engaged in," math "to be multiplied into," "become one of," "turn into." It means changing into a new state of being. When the participle takes a predicate, the sense is "coming into" something. This verb also has a number of special meanings with different prepositions. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi) which indicates existence in the same state. A genitive object indicates the time during which it "happens" or a date on which it "falls." A dative object indicates to whom it happens.

προσέρηξεν [2 verses]​(verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Beat vehemently" is from prosresso, which means to "dash", "beat against", or "burst". 

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Proper nouns do normally not take articles but they are needed when the noun ending cannot be changed to show the noun's role in the sentence as an object, indirect object, or genitive (possessive) form. However, the Greek article is very close to "this" so the purpose of an article like this can also be demonstrative. See this article

ποταμὸς [5 verses] (noun sg masc nom) "Floods" is potamos, which means "river", "stream", "artificial river," and "canal." 

τῇ [821 verses](article sg fem dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Proper nouns do normally not take articles but they are needed when the noun ending cannot be changed to show the noun's role in the sentence as an object, indirect object, or genitive (possessive) form. However, the Greek article is very close to "this" so the purpose of an article like this can also be demonstrative. See this article.  

οἰκίᾳ  [40 times](noun sg fem dat) "House" is oikia, which means "house," "building," and "household."

ἐκείνῃ, [107 verses](adj sg fem dat) "That" is ekeinos, which means "the person there," "that person," "that thing," and, in the form of an adverb, "in that case," "in that way," "at that place," and "in that manner." With certain preposition, it has a specific meaning:ἐξ ἐκείνου from that time, κατ᾽ ἐκεῖνα in that place, there, μετ᾽ ἐκεῖνα afterwards.

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

οὐκ [269 verses](adv) "Not" is ou , the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences.  The negative, οὐ, denies, is absolute, and objective.

ἴσχυσεν  [8 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Could "is ischyo, which means "to be strong", "to be powerful", "to prevail", "to be worth," and "to be equivalent to."

σαλεῦσαι [4 verses](verb aor inf act) "Shake" is from saleuô, which means "to cause to rock," "to make vibrate," "to be shaken," "to waver," "to totter," "to move up and down," "to roll," and "to toss." --

αὐτὴν [39 verses](adj sg fem acc) "It"  is auten, in the form of the singular, object, feminine pronoun "her/it." It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context. 

διὰ  [88 verses](prep) Untranslated is dia, which means with the genitive "through," "in the midst of," "in a line (movement)," "throughout (time)," "by (causal)," "for (causal)," "among," and "between." With the accusative, it can also be "thanks to," "because of,"  "by reasons of," and "for the sake of."

τὸ [821 verses](article sg neut acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  When not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Proper nouns do normally not take articles but they are needed when the noun ending cannot be changed to show the noun's role in the sentence as an object, indirect object, or genitive (possessive) form. However, the Greek article is very close to "this" so the purpose of an article like this can also be demonstrative.

καλῶς  [48 verses](adv) Untranslated is  an adverb,the word translated as "well" means, "well," "rightly,"  "happily,"  "thoroughly," "altogether," and "deservedly." 

οἰκοδομῆσθαι  [18 verses]( verb pres inf mp ) Untranslated is oikodomeo, which means to "build a house," generally, "build," "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify."

αὐτὴν [39 verses](adj sg fem acc) Untranslated is auten, in the form of the singular, object, feminine pronoun "her/it." It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context. 

Wordplay: 

Double meaning of "to deepend" is to think deeply.

The word translated as "laid" means "to place" and "to establish". 

The word translated as "foundation" is a metaphor like it is in English. 

Related Verses: 

parallel comparison: 

Though combining parts of Matthew 7:24 and Matthew 7:25, this version describe another situation completely. The Matthew version, told on the shore of Galilee, describe a house threatened by a storm. It is much more detailed than the version here.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 11 2024