Mark 14:24...This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

This is the blood of this contract of mine, the one being poured out over many

KJV : 

Mark 14:24  ... This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many.

NIV : 

Mark 14:24  This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many,

3rd Translation: 

Mark 14:24 This is my blood, which confirms the covenant between God and his people. It is poured out as a sacrifice for many.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The verb meaning "poured out" ("shed" in KJV) is played against the preposition meaning "over," which gets translated as "for." The form of the verb is "being poured out," which was describing the wine, probably as it was "being poured out." This plays on the double meaning of "over" as "for" and "upon." This connects this verse with Luke 11:50 (That the blood of all the prophets, which was shed), which uses the same uncommon word for "poured out." This indicates that Jesus saw himself as having this in common with the prophets.

Though translated as "covenant" means a will or more generally, a "contract" between two parties. Jesus only uses this will three times, here and in its parallels in the two other gospels. This verse is an interesting combination of both Matthew 26:28 and Luke 22:20.

Wordplay: 

The creation of the phrase "pour out over" to play on the double meaning of "over" as "about" and "upon."

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Τοῦτό (adj sg neut acc) "This" is from touto, which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]." -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."

ἐστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." -- The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

τὸ (article sg neut nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

αἷμά” (noun sg neut nom) "The blood" is haima (haima), which means "blood," "streams of blood", "anything like blood," "spirit", "courage", "bloodshed", "murder", "blood relationship,"kin," and "kindship." -- "Blood" is from the Greek word that means "blood", "bloodshed," and "kinship." Its common double meaning of bloodshed and kinship.

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

τῆς (article sg fem gen)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

διαθήκης” [3 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Testament" is diatheke, which means "a disposition (specifically of property by a will)", "will", a testament", "an arrangement between two parties", "a compact," and "a covenant."

τὸ  ( article sg neut nom ) "Which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἐκχυννόμενον { ἐκχυνόμενον}. ( part sg pres mp neut nom ) "Is shed" is ekcheo, which means to "pour out", "pour away", " spill", "squander", "waste", "spread out", "throw down," and, as a metaphor, "to be cast away", "forgotten", "give oneself up to any emotion," and "to be overjoyed." --

ὑπὲρ (prep) "For" is hyper (huper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure."

πολλῶν: (adj pl masc gen) "Many" is from polus, which means "many (in number)", "great (in size or power or worth)," and "large (of space)." As an adverb, it means "far", "very much", "a great way," and "long." -- The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

KJV Analysis: 

This -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."

is  --The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

blood "Blood" is from the Greek word that means "blood", "bloodshed," and "kinship." Its common double meaning of bloodshed and kinship.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

new -- (IS) There is no "new" in the Greek source.

testament, -- Testament" is a noun that means "a will", "a compact," and "a covenant." It does not mean "testament" in the sense of testimony or evidence.

which -- The word translated as "which" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

is  -- (WF) This helping verb "is" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. However, the verb here is not active, but a adjective form, so "being."

shed -- "Shed" is from a rare verb (for Jesus) that means "to pour out." The "out" comes from its prefix, which means "out."  It is in the form of a passive participle, "being poured out."

for -- "For" is a preposition that means "over", "more than," and in position, "above." It has a lot of possible meanings in English, but it is not the word used to mean "for your benefit", which is communicated by a specific noun form. The sense is "over you" in the sense "on the behalf", which is consistent with the different "on account of" preposition used in Matthew. However, this  play on words is obvious, blood being poured physically on them. Jesus uses a another preposition that means "upon" more clearly in Matthew 23:35.

many. -- The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

KJV Translation Issues: 

3
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "new" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "is" is not an active verb but a participle, "being."

NIV Analysis: 

This -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."

is  --The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

blood "Blood" is from the Greek word that means "blood", "bloodshed," and "kinship." Its common double meaning of bloodshed and kinship.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

testament, -- Testament" is a noun that means "a will", "a compact," and "a covenant." It does not mean "testament" in the sense of testimony or evidence.

which -- The word translated as "which" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

is  -- (WF) This helping verb "is" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. However, the verb here is not active, but a adjective form, so "being."

poured out-- "Poured out" is from a rare verb (for Jesus) that means "to pour out." The "out" comes from its prefix, which means "out."  It is in the form of a passive participle, "being poured out."

for -- "For" is a preposition that means "over", "more than," and in position, "above." It has a lot of possible meanings in English, but it is not the word used to mean "for your benefit", which is communicated by a specific noun form. The sense is "over you" in the sense "on the behalf", which is consistent with the different "on account of" preposition used in Matthew. However, this  play on words is obvious, blood being poured physically on them. Jesus uses a another preposition that means "upon" more clearly in Matthew 23:35.

many. -- The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

NIV Translation Issues: 

2
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "is" is not an active verb but a participle, "being."

3rd Analysis: 

This -- The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."

is  --The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

blood "Blood" is from the Greek word that means "blood", "bloodshed," and "kinship." Its common double meaning of bloodshed and kinship.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

testament, -- Testament" is a noun that means "a will", "a compact," and "a covenant." It does not mean "testament" in the sense of testimony or evidence.

which -- The word translated as "which" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

confirms the covenant between God and his people.  -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "confirms the covenant between God and his people." in the Greek source.

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

is  -- (WF) This helping verb "is" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. However, the verb here is not active, but a adjective form, so "being."

poured out-- "Poured out" is from a rare verb (for Jesus) that means "to pour out." The "out" comes from its prefix, which means "out."  It is in the form of a passive participle, "being poured out."

as a sacrifice -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "as a sacrifice" in the Greek source.

for -- "For" is a preposition that means "over", "more than," and in position, "above." It has a lot of possible meanings in English, but it is not the word used to mean "for your benefit", which is communicated by a specific noun form. The sense is "over you" in the sense "on the behalf", which is consistent with the different "on account of" preposition used in Matthew. However, this  play on words is obvious, blood being poured physically on them. Jesus uses a another preposition that means "upon" more clearly in Matthew 23:35.

many. -- The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

3rd Issue Count: 

4
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "confirms the covenant between God and his people." doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "is" is not an active verb but a participle, "being."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "as a sacrifice" doesn't exist in the source.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

The "blood" and "shed" connects this verse with Luke 11:50 (That the blood of all the prophets, which was shed), which uses the same uncommon word for "poured out." This indicates that Jesus saw himself as having this in common with the prophets.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 22 2020