Mark 14:48...Are ye come out, as against a thief,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Like against a thief, you show up out here! With machetes and clubs to get together [with] me?

KJV : 

Mark 14:48...Are ye come out, as against a thief, with swords and with staves to take me?

NIV : 

Mark 14:48 Am I leading a rebellion, that you have come out with swords and clubs to capture me?

3rd Translation: 

Mark 14:48 Am I some dangerous revolutionary, that you come with swords and clubs to arrest me?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse shows that, despite being sad about his coming trial, Jesus was very light-hearted at his arrest. There are several unusual words here that have entertaining double meanings. Jesus often chooses uncommon words because of their humorous effect.  He only uses the word translated as  "staves/clubs" four time. It means not only clubs but when referring to people it means "blockheads". The word translated as "take" is only used twice and it means, literally, "get together" both in the sense of "gathering" and enjoying each others' company.

The word for "thief" is used ten time and it is always translated that way except by the more modern gospels in this verse.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὡς (adv)"As" is from hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that."

ἐπὶ (prep)  "Against" is from epi. which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against." --

λῃστὴν [10 verses](noun sg masc acc ) "Thief" is from lestes, which means "robber" or "pirate."

ἐξήλθατε (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Are ye come out" is from exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true."

μετὰ "With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward."

μαχαιρῶν [8 verses](noun pl fem gen) "Swords" is machaira, which means a "large knife", "large dagger", "short sword," or "dirk." It specifically the type of weapon used for making sacrifices, by assassins, bodyguards, and jugglers.

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ξύλων [4 verses](noun pl neut gen) "Staves" is from xylon, which means "firewood", "timber", in the singular, a "piece of wood", "log", "beam", "post"; "cudgel", "club", various wooden instruments of punishment" "wooden collar", "stocks", "gallows", "impaling stakes", "bench", "table",of live wood, "tree", and of persons, "blockhead".

συλλαβεῖν [2 verses](verb aor inf act) "To take" is sullambano, which means "to collect", "to gather together", "to carry off", "to put together", "to seize", "to apprehend", "to arrest", "to enjoy together", "to take with," and "to take part in."

με; (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

KJV Analysis: 

Are -- This helping verb is added to make this a question, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

come out-- The word translated as "come out" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true." However, in the Greek, it appears later in the sentence, after the "as against a thief" phase. It is from the base word that seems to translate best as "show up" so "show up out here" work well.

as -- The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

against -- The word translated as "against" means "against", "at", "by" or "on."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

thief, The word translated as "thief" means "robber" or "pirate." It not sense of "rebel" or "revolutionary" in any modern sense. The adjective form mean "booty."

with "With" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of".

swords The term for "sword" specifically means a short sword, a weapon like a machete, since the Greek word used here is the source for the term.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). 

with -- There is no duplicate preposition here in the Greek, but the earlier preposition is assumed.

staves -- The Greek word translated as "staves" means "firewood", a "piece of wood", "cudgel", and various wooden instruments of punishment. It also means the "wood" of a treat or of a table.

to-- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

take -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "to take" has the root of the common Greek word for "take" or 
get," but it has the prefix that means "together." So its sense is "get together." It is an uncommon word, only used in this verse and the parallel in Matthew, that means "to collect", "to gather together," "to carry off", "to put together", and "to arrest". However, it also means "to enjoy together" and "to take part in."

me? -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

KJV Translation Issues: 

1
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The "take" means is from a root that means "take" or "get" with a prefix so it means "get together."

NIV Analysis: 

Am I leading a rebellion, that -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "am I leading a rebelling, that" in the Greek source.

untranslated "as"-- (MW) The untranslated word "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

untranslated "against"-- (MW) The untranslated word "against" means "against", "at", "by" or "on."

untranslated "thief"-- (MW) The untranslated word "thief" means "robber" or "pirate." It not sense of "rebel" or "revolutionary" in any modern sense. The adjective form mean "booty."

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

have -- This helping verb is added to make this a question, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

come out-- The word translated as "come out" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true." However, in the Greek, it appears later in the sentence, after the "as against a thief" phase. It is from the base word that seems to translate best as "show up" so "show up out here" work well.

with "With" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of".

swords The term for "sword" specifically means a short sword, a weapon like a machete, since the Greek word used here is the source for the term.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

clubs -- The Greek word translated as "clubs" means "firewood", a "piece of wood", "cudgel", and various wooden instruments of punishment. It also means the "wood" of a treat or of a table.

to-- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

capture -- The Greek word translated as "capture" has the root of the common Greek word for "take" or 
get," but it has the prefix that means "together." So its sense is "get together." It is an uncommon word, only used in this verse and the parallel in Matthew, that means "to collect", "to gather together," "to carry off", "to put together", and "to arrest". However, it also means "to enjoy together" and "to take part in."

me? -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

NIV Translation Issues: 

4
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "am I leading a rebelling, that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "as" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "against" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "thief" is not shown in the English translation.

3rd Analysis: 

Am I some dangerous revolutionary, that -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "Am I some dangerous revolutionary, that" in the Greek source.

untranslated "as"-- (MW) The untranslated word "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

untranslated "against"-- (MW) The untranslated word "against" means "against", "at", "by" or "on."

untranslated "thief"-- (MW) The untranslated word "thief" means "robber" or "pirate." It not sense of "rebel" or "revolutionary" in any modern sense. The adjective form mean "booty."

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

have -- This helping verb is added to make this a question, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

come -- (WW) The word translated as "come" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true." However, in the Greek, it appears later in the sentence, after the "as against a thief" phase. It is from the base word that seems to translate best as "show up" so "show up out here" work well.

with "With" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of".

swords The term for "sword" specifically means a short sword, a weapon like a machete, since the Greek word used here is the source for the term.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

clubs -- The Greek word translated as "clubs" means "firewood", a "piece of wood", "cudgel", and various wooden instruments of punishment. It also means the "wood" of a treat or of a table.

to-- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

arrest -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "capture" has the root of the common Greek word for "take" or 
get," but it has the prefix that means "together." So its sense is "get together." It is an uncommon word, only used in this verse and the parallel in Matthew, that means "to collect", "to gather together," "to carry off", "to put together", and "to arrest". However, it also means "to enjoy together" and "to take part in."

me? -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

3rd Issue Count: 

6
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "Am I some dangerous revolutionary, that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "as" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "against" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "thief" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "come" means "come out."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "arrest" means "get together."

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

Jesus seems to use "the sword" as a symbol for struggle, which he describes is necessary. Jesus says explicitly that his larger purpose is not to bring peace but the sword in Matthew 10:34. As a symbol of struggle, it is the opposite of the cup, which is the symbol of acceptance of suffering. Jesus makes this contrast between cup and sword explicit in John 18:11.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 4 2020