Matthew 10:20 For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

Sending of Apostles, inspiratio to speak

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because no, you yourselves are not the ones reporting, but the spirit breath of that Father of yours, the one reporting within you.

My Takeaway: 

We all have the spirit of the Divine echoing within us.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:20 For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit of your Father which speaketh in you.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:20  for it will not be you speaking, but the Spirit of your Father speaking through you.

3rd Translation: 

Matthew 10:20 For it is not you who will be speaking—it will be the Spirit of your Father speaking through you.

What is Lost in Translation: 

The "you" is emphasized here because the pronoun is used, which is like saying "you yourselves."  The negative comes before the pronoun, specifically nullifying that word, "not your yourselves," not the entire clause.

The verb translated as "speaking" means passing on or repeating something you have heard. This was the same word used in the previous verse, Matthew 10:19. This is not the two common words that mean "to say" or "to speak" but a more humorous one that Jesus uses to refer to his own speaking, It is humorous because it has the sense of "chattering" and "gossiping," its primary meanings.

This is the first used of "spirit" referring to the Divine spirit. The only earlier use of the word for "spirit" referred to the "poort in spirit."  Note, the spirit is also just "repeating" or "reporting"  something, not originating it.

 

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "spirit" also means "breath," which is what we need to speak. The word translated as "speak" has the sense of passing on information, that is, communicating it rather than originating it, the idea of "echoing" information.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

οὐ (partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "You" is from hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

ἐστὲ (2nd pl pres ind act) "It is" is from eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative. --

οἱ (article pl  masc nom) "That " is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

λαλοῦντες (part pl pres act masc nom) "speak" is from laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle," "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech.

ἀλλὰ (adv) "But" is from alla, which means "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay."

τὸ (article sg neut nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πνεῦμα (noun sg neut nom) "The Spirit" is from pneuma, which means "blast," "wind," "breath," "the breath of life," "divine inspiration," "a spiritual or immaterial being," and "the spirit" of a man.

τοῦ (article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

πατρὸς (noun sg masc gen) "of...Father" is from pater, which means "father," "grandfather," "author," "parent," and "forefathers."

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

τὸ (article sg neut nom) "Which" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

λαλοῦν (part sg pres act neut nom) "Which speaketh" is from laleo, which means "to talk," "to speak" "to prattle," "to chat," and [for oracles] "to proclaim." It also means "chatter" as the opposite of articulate speech.

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," and "with."

ὑμῖν.(pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given.

KJV Analysis: 

For  -- The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

it --  (IW) This indicates the third-person, singular form of the verb, but the verb is second person plural.

is -- (WF) The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. However, it is not in the form of "it is" but "you are."

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" in English captures this difference. Read more about the two Greek negatives in this article.

ye -- The pronoun is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use creates emphasis on the "you." It is like saying "you yourselves" in English, a bit redundant, but with a purpose. The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

that -- The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

speak,  -- (CW, WF) The Greek word translated as "that speak" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek. This word means both "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Christ uses it to capture the idea of "pass on" or "report," because that captures both what someone gossiping does and what an oracle does. Christ uses this word selectively. The word is somewhat self-effacing. Christ uses it to characterize passing on the words of the Father or the Spirit. It is in the form of an adjective, "passing on" or "reporting," used as a noun in the form of a subject of the phrase, "the ones reporting."

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" denote an exception or simple opposition. It is not the most common form of "but" use in the NT. It is an adverb, more than a conjunction. It can mean, "but," "except," or "rather."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Spirit -- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath," "wind," "blast," and "divine inspiration." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of," "which is," "than" (in comparisons), or  "for," "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

your -- The word translated as "your" is plural genitive, but it appears after the word so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is from the word meaning male parent or ancestor. It is in the possessive form.

which -- The word translated as "which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

speaketh  -- (CW, WF) The Greek word translated as "which speaketh" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek, but it is the same word as used above. This word means both "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Again, it is acting as a noun, but here is it singular, "the one reporting."

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within," "by," or "with."

you. -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

KJV Translation Issues: 

7
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "is" is second person, plural form, "are.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speak" is not a common word, but one that means "report" or "pass on."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "speak" is not an active verb but a participle, "reporting."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speaketh" is not a common word, but one that means "report" or "pass on."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "speak" is not an active verb but a participle, "reporting."

NIV Analysis: 

for  -- The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

it --  (IW) This indicates the third-person, singular form of the verb, but the verb is second person plural.

will  -- (WT) This helping verb "will" indicates the future tense, but the verb is not the future.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" in English captures this difference. Read more about the two Greek negatives in this article.

be -- (WF) The verb "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. However, it is not in the form of "it is" but "you are."

you -- The pronoun is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use creates emphasis on the "you." It is like saying "you yourselves" in English, a bit redundant, but with a purpose. The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

untranslated "the"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

speaking,  -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "that speak" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek. This word means both "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Christ uses it to capture the idea of "pass on" or "report," because that captures both what someone gossiping does and what an oracle does. Christ uses this word selectively. The word is somewhat self-effacing. Christ uses it to characterize passing on the words of the Father or the Spirit. It is in the form of an adjective, "passing on" or "reporting," used as a noun in the form of a subject of the phrase, "the ones reporting."

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" denote an exception or simple opposition. It is not the most common form of "but" use in the NT. It is an adverb, more than a conjunction. It can mean, "but," "except," or "rather."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Spirit -- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath," "wind," "blast," and "divine inspiration." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of," "which is," "than" (in comparisons), or  "for," "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs.

your -- The word translated as "your" is plural genitive, but it appears after the word so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is from the word meaning male parent or ancestor. It is in the possessive form.

untranslated "the"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

speaking -- (CW,) The Greek word translated as "which speaketh" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek, but it is the same word as used above. This word means both "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Again, it is acting as a noun, but here is it singular, "the one reporting."

through -- (WW) The word translated as "through" also means "in," "within," "by," or "with."

you. -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

NIV Translation Issues: 

9
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" indicate the future tense but the verb is the present tense. 
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "be" is second person, plural form, "are.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speaking" is not a common word, but one that means "reporting."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speaking" is not a common word, but one that means "reporting."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "through" should be something more like "in."

3rd Analysis: 

For  -- The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

it --  (IW) This indicates the third-person, singular form of the verb, but the verb is second person plural.

is -- (WF) The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. However, it is not in the form of "it is" but "you are."

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" in English captures this difference. Read more about the two Greek negatives in this article.

you -- The pronoun is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use creates emphasis on the "you." It is like saying "you yourselves" in English, a bit redundant, but with a purpose. The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners.

who -- (WW) The untranslated word "who" is the Greek definite article, "the,: which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

will be -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "will be " in the Greek source.

speaking,  -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "that speak" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek. This word means both "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Christ uses it to capture the idea of "pass on" or "report," because that captures both what someone gossiping does and what an oracle does. Christ uses this word selectively. The word is somewhat self-effacing. Christ uses it to characterize passing on the words of the Father or the Spirit. It is in the form of an adjective, "passing on" or "reporting," used as a noun in the form of a subject of the phrase, "the ones reporting."w

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but" denote an exception or simple opposition. It is not the most common form of "but" use in the NT. It is an adverb, more than a conjunction. It can mean, "but," "except," or "rather."

it will be -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "it will be " in the Greek source.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Spirit -- The word translated as "spirit" primarily means "breath," "wind," "blast," and "divine inspiration." It also means the "breath of life," from which we get to "spirit" and "spiritual." Its meaning as "the breath of life" is brought out by the idea of creating life. Its meaning as "spiritual" is brought out by the contrast with "physical."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of," "which is," "than" (in comparisons), or  "for," "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs.

your -- The word translated as "your" is plural genitive, but it appears after the word so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Father -- "Father" is from the word meaning male parent or ancestor. It is in the possessive form.

untranslated "the"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

speaking -- (CW,) The Greek word translated as "which speaketh" is not the ordinary "to say" or "to speak" in Greek, but it is the same word as used above. This word means both "idle chatter," "gossip," and "the proclamations of an oracle." Again, it is acting as a noun, but here is it singular, "the one reporting."

through -- (WW) The word translated as "through" also means "in," "within," "by," or "with."

you. -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

3rd Issue Count: 

10
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" indicate the future tense but the verb is the present tense. 
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "be" is second person, plural form, "are.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "will be" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speaking" is not a common word, but one that means "reporting."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "it will be" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "speaking" is not a common word, but one that means "reporting."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "through" should be something more like "in."

evidence: 

125.00

Front Page Date: 

Sep 5 2020