Matthew 10:22 And you shall be hated by all...

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

Sending of Apostles, Warnings

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And you will exist being hated, benath all through this name of mine. The one, however, staying firm up to the culmination, this one will be rescued.

My Takeaway: 

Staying firm to the end is necessary for a happy ending.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:22 And ye shall be hated of all men for my name's sake: but he that endureth to the end shall be saved.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:22 You will be hated by everyone because of me, but the one who stands firm to the end will be saved.

3rd Translation: 

Matthew 10:22 And all nations will hate you because you are my followers. But everyone who endures to the end will be saved.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There is a keyword here is translated as "of" in the KJV and "by" in the NIV and not translated at all in the NLT.  It primarily means "under," "beneath," and similar meanings. Its phrase means "hated beneath all" not "of all" or "by all." Jesus actually uses this exact same verb/preposition in four different verses. It seems to be equivalent of the English "hated above all."

This "under" or "beneath" word is the prefix of the verb translated as "endure"  or "stand firm." This verb, however, is a bit of sexual innuendo, having the sense of "staying firm." This verb means "stay-behind," "await," and similar meanings but literally means "stay under" or "stat beneath."  A clearer sense of sexual firmness is seen in Matthew 24:13, but in that verse, it is contrasted with "love" from Matthew 24:12.

The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal." It is the term Jesus uses to describe the end or the purpose of an era or lifetime. Its use in the phrase "end of the world" is discussed in this article. However, the "purpose" discussed here may the reunion of Christ with is followers discussed in the next verse. Matthew 10:23. This word, however, does not have a definite article "the end" or "the goal." So it must be translated as "an end" or "a goal."  The verb form of this word is translated as "gone over" in the next verse.

Wordplay: 

 The phrase translated as "hated by all" actually means either "being hated" or "hating yourself under all." 
The word translated as "endure" means "remain under" and it a play on the above phase. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv)"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἔσεσθε (2nd pl fut ind) "You shall be" is from eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," and "is possible."

μισούμενοι (part pl pres mp masc nom) "Hated" is from miseo, which means "to hate" and in passive, "to be hated."

ὑπὸ (prep) "Of" is from hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)," "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by," "under," or "with," "under the cover or protection of," "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate," "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection," "control," "dependence," of Time, "in the course of," "during," "about," as an adverb, "under," "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by," "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause, as here).

πάντων (adj pl masc gen) "All" is from pas, which means "all," "the whole," "every," "anyone," "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way," "on every side," "in every way," and "altogether." -

διὰ (prep) "For" is from dia which means "through," "in the midst of," "in a line (movement)," "throughout (time)," "by (causal)," "among," and "between." The causal "by" could also means "because of" or "due to."

τὸ (article sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

ὄνομά (noun sg neut acc) "Name" is from onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative.

μου: (pron 1st sg gen) "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

(article sg masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ὑπομείνας [6 times](part sg aor act masc nom) "He that endureth" is from hypomeno, which means "stay behind," "stay beneath," "await," "bide," "stand one's ground," "stay firm," and "dare to do."

εἰς (prep) "To" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τέλος (noun sg neut acc) "End" is from telos, which means "come to pass," "performance," "consummation," "result," "product," "outcome," "end," "achievement," "attainment," "goal," "state of completion," "maturity," "services rendered," "something done," "task," "duty," "toll," and "custom."

οὗτος (adj sg masc nom) Untranslated is from houtos, which means "this," "that," "the nearer."

σωθήσεται. (3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be saved" is soizo, which means "save from death," "keep alive," "keep safe," "preserve," "maintain," "keep in mind," "carry off safely," and "rescue."

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

ye  -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

shall -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense . Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- (CW) The verb "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It is NOT a helping verb that indicates that the following verb is passive though that verb is passive. This verb should be translated as "exist" to avoid ignoring it.

hated  -- "Hated" is from a Greek verb meaning "to hate." However, it is in the form of an adjective, "hating." However, it is in a passive form, "being hated."

of -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "of" is very important but this is hidden in translation. It appears lated in the verse as part of a verb. Its primarily means "under," "beneath," and similar meanings. It can indicate a cause, "by," or "with" when it is used with a passive verb, but the verb here is a middle-passive, which is not quite the same. Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion. The sense seemed to be describing the decree of hate, "beneath all." In English, we might say "above all" but the sense here is the same.

all -- The word translated as "all" is one word meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. It is an adjective acting as a noun. The "all" does seem to mean "all people."

men -- (IS) There is no Greek word that is translated as "men" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used.

for -- "For" is a Greek word that means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." Of persons, it means "thanks to," "by aid of," but in prose, "by reason of," "on account of." The sense here the causal "by" that could also means "because of" or "due to." See this article on the various prepositions used in the "my name"  phrases.

my  -- "My" is the Greek pronoun in a form that means "my," or "mine." It actually appears after the following noun.

name's -- (WF) The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

sake: -- (IS) There is no word meaning "sake" in the Greek. This is important because there is a specific Greek word that means "for [some] sake" and Christ uses it frequently. Most recently just a few verses ago in Matthew 10:18. There is a subtle difference in meaning.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better

he -- The word translated as "he " is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here it precedes an verbal adjective. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

that -- These is no "that" here. It is added because the following verb was  changed from an adjective to an active verb in translation. 

endureth  -- (CW, WF) "Endureth" is a verb that means "stay behind," "await," "bide," "stand one's ground," "stay firm," and "dare to do."  It is in the form of an adjective, "awaiting." It starts with the preposition used earlier translated as "of" but meaning "under." It it is a tense that indicates something happening at a specific point in time. It is in the form of an adjective, "staying beneath" or "staying subordinate" used as a noun, "the one staying subordinate." This is, of course, a play on the "below all" earlier in the verse.

to  -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used.  There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

end -- (CW) The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal." It is the term Christ use to describe the end or the purpose of an era or lifetime. Its use in the phrase "end of the world" is discussed in this article. However, the "purpose" discussed here may the reunion of Christ with is followers discussed in the next verse. Matthew 10:23. This word, however, does not have a definite article "the end" or "the goal." So it must be translated as "an end" or "a goal."

shall -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense . Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

untranslated "this one" --  (MW) There is an untranslated Greek word here that means "this" or "this one."

saved.  -- "Saved" is the Greek word that means "to keep alive" when applied to people or "to keep safe" when applied to things. Christ uses it to mean "rescue" in most cases. It has a general sense of pulling someone toward yourself away from danger.

KJV Translation Issues: 

9
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "be" is not a helping verb but is own statement, "exist."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "of" means "beneath."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "men" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "name" is not a possessive form ("name's").
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "sake" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "endureth" means "stay behind" or "stay under."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "endureth" is not an active verb but a participle, "staying beneath."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "end" means the completion or goal of something not simply the stopping or ending of it.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "this one" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

You -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense . Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- (CW) The verb "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It is NOT a helping verb that indicates that the following verb is passive though that verb is passive. This verb should be translated as "exist" to avoid ignoring it.

hated  -- "Hated" is from a Greek verb meaning "to hate." However, it is in the form of an adjective, "hating." However, it is in a passive form, "being hated."

by -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "by" is very important but this is hidden in translation. It primarily means "under," "beneath," and similar meanings. It can indicate a cause, "by," or "with" when it is used with a passive verb, as it is here. Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion. The sense seemed to be describing the decree of hate, "beneath all." In English, we might say "above all" but the sense here is the same. This word is important because is used again later in the verse as a prefix of a verb.

everyone -- The word translated as "all" is one word meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. It is an adjective acting as a noun. The "all" does seem to mean "all people."

 because of -- "Because of" is a Greek word that means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." Of persons, it means "thanks to," "by aid of," but in prose, "by reason of," "on account of." The sense here the causal "by" that could also means "because of" or "due to." See this article on the various prepositions used in the "my name"  phrases.

me -- (WF) "Me" is the Greek pronoun in a form that means "my," or "mine." It actually appears after the following noun.

untranslated "name"-- (MW) The untranslated word"name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better

the one -- The word translated as "the one" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here it precedes an verbal adjective. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more.

who -- These is no "who" here. It is added because the following verb was  changed from an adjective to an active verb in translation. 

stands firm -- (CW, WF) "Stands firm" is a verb that means "stay behind," "await," "bide," "stand one's ground," "stay firm," and "dare to do."  It is in the form of an adjective, "awaiting." It starts with the preposition used earlier translated as "of" but meaning "under." It it is a tense that indicates something happening at a specific point in time. It is in the form of an adjective, "staying beneath" or "staying subordinate" used as a noun, "the one staying subordinate." This is, of course, a play on the "below all" earlier in the verse.

to  -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used.  There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

end -- (CW) The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal." It is the term Christ use to describe the end or the purpose of an era or lifetime. Its use in the phrase "end of the world" is discussed in this article. However, the "purpose" discussed here may the reunion of Christ with is followers discussed in the next verse. Matthew 10:23. This word, however, does not have a definite article "the end" or "the goal." So it must be translated as "an end" or "a goal."

will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense . Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

untranslated "this one" --  (MW) There is an untranslated Greek word here that means "this" or "this one."

saved.  -- "Saved" is the Greek word that means "to keep alive" when applied to people or "to keep safe" when applied to things. Christ uses it to mean "rescue" in most cases. It has a general sense of pulling someone toward yourself away from danger.

NIV Translation Issues: 

9
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "be" is not a helping verb but is own statement, "exist."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "by" means "beneath."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "me" pronoun is possessive, "my" or "of mine."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "name" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "stands firm" means "stay behind" or "stay under."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "stands firm" is not an active verb but a participle, "staying beneath."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "end" means the completion or goal of something not simply the stopping or ending of it.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "this one" is not shown in the English translation.

3rd Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

untranslated "beneath"-- (MW) The untranslated word "beneath" is very important but this is hidden in translation. It primarily means "under," "beneath," and similar meanings. It can indicate a cause, "by," or "with" when it is used with a passive verb, as it is here. Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion. The sense seemed to be describing the decree of hate, "beneath all." In English, we might say "above all" but the sense here is the same. This word is important because is used again later in the verse as a prefix of a verb.

all -- (WF) The word translated as "all" is one word meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. It is an adjective acting as a noun. The "all" does seem to mean "all people" This word is not in the form of a subject but the object of a preposition.

nations - (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "nations" in the Greek source.

will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense . Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

untranslated "exist"-- (MW) The untranslated word "exist" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It is NOT a helping verb that indicates that the following verb is passive though that verb is passive. This verb should be translated as "exist" to avoid ignoring it.

hate  -- (WF, WV) "Hate" is from a Greek verb meaning "to hate." However, it is in the form of an adjective, "hating." However, it is in a passive form, "being hated."

you - (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "you" in the Greek source

because -- (CW) "Because of" is a Greek word that means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." Of persons, it means "thanks to," "by the aid of," but in prose, "by reason of," "on account of." The sense here the causal "by" that could also mean "because of" or "due to."  This is not the Greek conjunction usually translated as "because" but a simple preposition.  See this article on the various prepositions used in the "my name"  phrases.

you are -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "you are" in the Greek source.

my-- "My" is the Greek pronoun in a form that means "my," or "mine." It actually appears after the following noun.

untranslated "name"-- (MW) The untranslated word "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

followers - (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "followers" in the Greek source.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

everyone -- (WW) The word translated as "everyone is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here it precedes a verbal adjective. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more.

who -- These is no "who" here. It is added because the following verb was  changed from an adjective to an active verb in translation. 

endures -- (CW, WF) "Endures " is a verb that means "stay behind," "await," "bide," "stand one's ground," "stay firm," and "dare to do."  It is in the form of an adjective, "awaiting." It starts with the preposition used earlier translated as "of" but meaning "under." It it is a tense that indicates something happening at a specific point in time. It is in the form of an adjective, "staying beneath" or "staying subordinate" used as a noun, "the one staying subordinate." This is, of course, a play on the "below all" earlier in the verse.

to  -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used.  There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

end -- (CW) The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal." It is the term Christ use to describe the end or the purpose of an era or lifetime. Its use in the phrase "end of the world" is discussed in this article. However, the "purpose" discussed here may the reunion of Christ with is followers discussed in the next verse. Matthew 10:23. This word, however, does not have a definite article "the end" or "the goal." So it must be translated as "an end" or "a goal."

will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense . Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

untranslated "this one" --  (MW) There is an untranslated Greek word here that means "this" or "this one."

saved.  -- "Saved" is the Greek word that means "to keep alive" when applied to people or "to keep safe" when applied to things. Christ uses it to mean "rescue" in most cases. It has a general sense of pulling someone toward yourself away from danger.

3rd Issue Count: 

16
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "beneath" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "all" is not a subject by and object of a preposition.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "nations" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "exist" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "hate" is not an active verb but an participle, "hating."
  • WV - Wrong Voice-  The "hate" is not in the active voice but the passive, "being hated."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "you" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "because" is not the conjunction by a preposition "because of."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "you are" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "name" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "followers" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "everyone" means "the one."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "endures" means "stay behind" or "stay under."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "endures" is not an active verb but a participle, "staying beneath."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "end" means the completion or goal of something not simply the stopping or ending of it.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "this one" is not shown in the English translation.

evidence: 

127.00

Front Page Date: 

Sep 7 2020