Matthew 10:9 Provide neither gold, nor silver,

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

The sending of the Apostles when topic changes to money

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

You should not want to acquire for yourself gold, silver, or copper in your belt.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:9 Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass in your purses,

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Again the verb here is not a command, though it appears that way in all English translations. It is a statement about what "should" or "might" happen. Since the negative is one of opinion, the "should" seems most appropriate. the future.

The words for "gold," "silver," and "brass/copper" have double meanings. The first covers everything precious, the second covers all money, and the third also means military arms.  The words for silver, brass, and purse are only used by Jesus here. People in Jesus's time didn't use "purses." They rolled up their money in their belts. -

NIV : 

Matthew 10:9  Do not get any gold or silver or copper to take with you in your belts—

3rd Translation: 

Matthew 10:9 Don’t take any money in your money belts—no gold, silver, or even copper coins.

Wordplay: 

The words for "gold," "silver," and "brass/copper" have double meanings. The first covers everything precious, the second all money, and the third military arms. 

My Takeaway: 

You cannot buy success with money.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Μὴ (partic) Untranslated" is me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

κτήσησθε [3 verses] (verb 2nd pl aor subj mid or 2nd pl fut ind mid) "Provide" is from ktaomai, which means to "acquire", "get specifically for oneself", "procure for oneself", "win", "bring upon oneself (of consequences)," and "have in store (opposite of echo, "having in hand").

χρυσὸν [3 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Gold" is chrysos, which means "gold", "things made of gold (including stamped coins)." and "anything dear or precious."

μηδὲ (partic) "Neither" is from mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not."

ἄργυρον [1 verse](noun sg masc acc) "Silver" is from arguros, which means "any white metal", "silver", "silver plate", "quicksilver," "silver-money," and, generally, "money."

μηδὲ ( partic ) "Neither" is from mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not."

χαλκὸν [1 verse](noun sg fem acc) "Brass" is from chalkos, which means "copper", "bronze", "anything made of metal (esp. of arms)", "vessels of copper", "cauldron", "urn", "copper money", "bronze plate" and "tablet."

εἰς (prep) "In" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὰς (article pl fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ζώνας [1 verse](noun pl fem acc) "Purses" is from zone, which means "the lower girdle worn by women just above the hips (and therefore related to marrige, intercourse, and childbirth)", " male belt", "a belt used as a purse", "the waist", "anything that goes round like a belt," "one of the zones of the terrestrial sphere," and "one of the planetary spheres."

ὑμῶν, (adj pl masc gen) "Your" is from humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

KJV Analysis: 

untranslated "no"-- (MW) The untranslated word negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

Provide -- (WW, WF) The term translated as "provide" means "to acquire," but specifically for yourself. It also means "to possess" in the sense of having something stored in opposition to echo, having it in hand. With the "in" (below) preposition it is used to mean "store." The form is one of probably, which requires a "should" or "might" as  a helping verb. Because of the form of negative use, the one of opinion, a "should" seems best.

missing "by/for yourself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "by yourself."

neither -- The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

gold, -- "Gold" if from a word that means things made of gold and, poetically, anything precious to a person, including stamped coins.

nor -- The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

silver, -- "Silver" is from a Greek word that means any white metal or anything plated with white metal. It is also used to refer generally to money.

nor -- The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

brass -- "Brass" is from a word that means either "copper" or "bronze", or generally, anything made of metal, specifically weapons.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

your  -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners. It follows "money belt" so "of yours."

purses, -- (WW) "Purses" is a Greek word for the belt of a man, worn at the waist and all related ideas. In Jesus's time, the belt was a rolled up piece of cloth in which money valuables were secured that was tied to your body. In our time, the right terms in "money belt."

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "no" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "take" is not a command, but a statement about what "should" happen.
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "provide" means "get for yourself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "purse" means "belt."

NIV Analysis: 

Do  -- This helping verb is added to make this a negative sentence.

not -- The negative "not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

get --  (WF) he term translated as "get" means "to acquire," but specifically for yourself. It also means "to possess" in the sense of having something stored in opposition to having it in hand. With the "in" (below) preposition it is used to mean "store." The form is one of probably, which requires a "should" or "might" as  a helping verb. Because of the form of negative use, the one of opinion, a "should" seems best.

missing "by/for yourself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "by yourself."

any -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "any" in the Greek source.

gold -- "Gold" if from a word that means things made of gold and, poetically, anything precious to a person, including stamped coins.

or - (WW) The word for "or" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

silver -- "Silver" is from a Greek word that means any white metal or anything plated with white metal. It is also used to refer generally to money.

or - (WW) The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

copper -- "Copper" is from a word that means either "copper" or "bronze", or generally, anything made of metal, specifically weapons.

to take with you  -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "to take with you" in the Greek source.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

your  -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

belts, --  "Belts" is a Greek word for the belt of a man, worn at the waist and all related ideas. In Jesus's time, the belt was a rolled-up piece of cloth in which money valuables were secured that was tied to your body. In our time, the right terms in "money belt."

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "take" is not a command, but a statement about what "should" happen.
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "any" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" means "nor."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" means "nor."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "to take with you" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

3rd Analysis: 

Do  -- This helping verb is added to make this a negative sentence.

n't -- The negative "n't" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

take-- (WF) The term translated as "take" means "to acquire," but specifically for yourself. It also means "to possess" in the sense of having something stored in opposition to having it in hand. With the "in" (below) preposition it is used to mean "store." The form is one of probably, which requires a "should" or "might" as  a helping verb. Because of the form of negative use, the one of opinion, a "should" seems best.

missing "by/for yourself"-- (WV) A phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "by yourself."

any money -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "any money" in the Greek source.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

your  -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

money belts, --  "Belts" is a Greek word for the belt of a man, worn at the waist and all related ideas. In Jesus's time, the belt was a rolled-up piece of cloth in which money valuables were secured that was tied to your body. In our time, the right terms in "money belt."

no -- There is no extra "no" here, but a negative before a verb negates the entire verse.

gold, -- "Gold" if from a word that means things made of gold and, poetically, anything precious to a person, including stamped coins.

untranslated "nor"-- (MW) The untranslated word "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

silver -- "Silver" is from a Greek word that means any white metal or anything plated with white metal. It is also used to refer generally to money.

or - The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

even -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "even" in the Greek source.

copper -- "Copper" is from a word that means either "copper" or "bronze", or generally, anything made of metal, specifically weapons.

coins -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "coims" in the Greek source.

3rd Issue Count: 

8
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "take" is not a command, but a statement about what "should" happen.
  • WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the middle voice requiring the concept of "yourselves" as its object.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase -- The words "any money" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "nor" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" means "nor."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "even" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "coins" doesn't exist in the source.

The Spoken Version: 

“Many of us can’t or don’t want to asked our families for gold,
 complained Thaddeus.
“No, you’re not going to want to acquire gold,” agreed the Master.
“Many of us can’t or don’t want to asked our families for gold,
 complained Thaddeus.
“Silver should be enough for just walking around money, “ suggested the homely Ben Alpheaus optimistically.
“Nor silver,” chuckled the Master in response.
“Just coppers? For maybe weeks of travel?” complained Ben Simon. “Might as well have an empty money belt!”
“Nor copper in those belts of yours,” added the Master.

evidence: 

114.00

Front Page Date: 

Aug 25 2020