Matthew 12:35 A good man out of the good treasure

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Pharisees attack,  casting out demons, good trees and fruit,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The valuable person from the valuable stockpile, tosses out valuable things and the worthless person from the worthless stockpiles, tosses out worthless things. 

KJV : 

Matthew 12:35 A good man out of the good treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things: and an evil man out of the evil treasure bringeth forth evil things.

NIV : 

Matthew 12:35 A good man brings good things out of the good stored up in him, and an evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in him.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The vocabulary of this verse connects to the general theme of "casting out" demons. The verb translated as "brings forth/brings" is means "caste out from." It is the same word used for demons, but we cannot see this in  translation. So Jesus is still addressing the Pharisees who accused him of casting out demons by demonic power. But this a play on words, because because casting out demons is a good thing even though the demons are bad.

The economic and broader implications of this verse are hidden in its translation in terms of "good" and "evil." Read this article that discusses the Greek meaning of the key terms here. The contrast is not between "good" and "evil." The Greek words are closer to the ideas of useful and worthless, the brave and the cowardly, the beneficial and useless. The KJV makes the Luke version (Luke 6:45)  look more like this one than it does. 

Wordplay: 

The verb translated here as "bringeth forth" was the same word used to described "casting out" devils earlier in this chapter (Matthew 12:26-Matthew 12:28) . In English, we might say that he "throws out" devils and "throws out" good ideas in the same play on words. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

(article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἀγαθὸς (adj sg masc nom) "Good " is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born," "gentle," "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable," "morally good," and "beneficial."

ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "Man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -

ἐκ (prep) "Out of " is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἀγαθοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "Good " is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born," "gentle," "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable," "morally good," and "beneficial."

θησαυροῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Treasure" is from thesauros, which means a "store," "treasure," "strong-room," "magazine, "granary," "receptacle for valuables," "safe," "casket," "offertory-box," "cavern," and "subterranean dungeon."

ἐκβάλλει (3rd sg pres ind act) "Bringeth forth" is from ekballo and means "throw out," "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of," "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter."

ἀγαθά, (adj pl neut acc) "Good things" is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born," "gentle," "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable," "morally good," and "beneficial."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

(article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

πονηρὸς (adj sg masc nom) "Evil" is from poneros, which we discuss extensively in this page. In a moral sense, it means "worthless," "base," and "cowardly."

ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "Man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -

ἐκ (prep) "Out of " is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

πονηροῦ (adj sg masc gen) "Evil" is from poneros, which we discuss extensively in this page. In a moral sense, it means "worthless," "base," and "cowardly."

θησαυροῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Treasure" is from thesauros, which means a "store," "treasure," "strong-room," "magazine, "granary," "receptacle for valuables," "safe," "casket," "offertory-box," "cavern," and "subterranean dungeon."

κβάλλει (3rd sg pres ind act) "Bringeth forth" is from ekballo and means "throw out," "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of," "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter."

πονηρά. (adj pl neut nom/acc) "Evil" is from poneros, which we discuss extensively in this page. In a moral sense, it means "worthless," "base," and "cowardly."

KJV Analysis: 

A -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

good  - The adjective translated as "good" means "useful," "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

man   - The Greek word for "man" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural,  it means "people" and "peoples." The word is introduced by an article, "the man" or "the person." 

out of  - The Greek preposition translated as "out of" means "out of" or "from." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

good  - The "good" here is the same word as above, meaning "useful," "worthwhile," and "of high quality.

treasure  - The word translated as "treasure" means a "store" of something and its secondary meaning is valuables. "Also meaning a "strong room," "a granary," "a safe," or "a cavern." It is not the valuables themselves, but the place where they are kept, and the basis for our word, "thesaurus."

of the heart -- (OS) There is nothing in the Greek that can be translated as "of the heart" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used. There is in the Luke version (Luke 6:45). 

bringeth forth - (WW) "Brings forth" is a Greek verb that means "cast out," "throw away," "lose," and "produce." For example, this word is applied to "casting out" devils and to women giving birth to children. Jesus uses it more lightly captures by the English as "tosses out."  A different verb is used in Luke that actually does mean "bring forth." 

good  - The "good " here is the same word as above, meaning "useful," "worthwhile," and "of high quality.

things: -- "Things" is from the neuter plural form of the previous adjective.

and -  The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

an -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

evil  - The Greek word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores its meaning in more detail. 

man   - The Greek word for "man" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural,  it means "people" and "peoples." The word is introduced by an article, "the man" or "the person." 

out of  - The Greek preposition translated as "out of" means "out of" or "from." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

evil  - The Greek word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores its meaning in more detail. 

treasure  - The word translated as "treasure" means a "store" of something and its secondary meaning is valuables. "Also meaning a "strong room," "a granary," "a safe," or "a cavern." It is not the valuables themselves, but the place where they are kept, and the basis for our word, "thesaurus."

bringeth forth  - (WW) "Brings forth" is again the Greek verb that means "cast out," "throw away," "lose," and "produce. Christ uses it more lightly captures by the English as "tosses out." 

evil  - The Greek word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless."

things.  - - "Things" is from the neuter plural form of the previous adjective.

KJV Translation Issues: 

3
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "of the heart" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "bringeth forth" should be "tosses out."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "bringeth forth" should be "tosses out."

NIV Analysis: 

A -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

good  - The adjective translated as "good" means "useful," "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

man   - The Greek word for "man" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural,  it means "people" and "peoples." The word is introduced by an article, "the man" or "the person." 

brings- (WW) "Brings" is a Greek verb that means "cast out," "throw away," "lose," and "produce." For example, this word is applied to "casting out" devils and to women giving birth to children. Jesus uses it more lightly captures by the English as "tosses out."  A different verb is used in Luke that actually does mean "bring forth." 

good  - The "good " here is the same word as above, meaning "useful," "worthwhile," and "of high quality.

things: -- "Things" is from the neuter plural form of the previous adjective.

out of  - The Greek preposition translated as "out of" means "out of" or "from." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

goods  - (WN) The "goods" here is the same word as above, meaning "useful," "worthwhile," and "of high quality. This adjective is singular, not plural, nor is it used as a noun.

stored up - (WF) The word translated as "stoed up" means a "store" of something and its secondary meaning is valuables. "Also meaning a "strong room," "a granary," "a safe," or "a cavern." It is not the valuables themselves, but the place where they are kept, and the basis for our word, "thesaurus." This is not a participle, but a noun.

in him, -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "in him" in the Greek source.

and -  The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

an -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

evil  - The Greek word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores its meaning in more detail. 

man   - The Greek word for "man" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural,  it means "people" and "peoples." The word is introduced by an article, "the man" or "the person." 

brings- (WW) "Brings" is again the Greek verb that means "cast out," "throw away," "lose," and "produce. Christ uses it more lightly captures by the English as "tosses out." 

evil  - The Greek word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless."

things.  - - "Things" is from the neuter plural form of the previous adjective.

out of  - The Greek preposition translated as "out of" means "out of" or "from." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

evil  - The Greek word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores its meaning in more detail. 

stored up - (WF) The word translated as "stored up" means a "store" of something and its secondary meaning is valuables. "Also meaning a "strong room," "a granary," "a safe," or "a cavern." It is not the valuables themselves, but the place where they are kept, and the basis for our word, "thesaurus." This is not a participle, but a noun.

in him, -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "in him" in the Greek source.

NIV Translation Issues: 

8
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "brings" should be "tosses out."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "goods" is translated as plural but it is singular, "good."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "stored up" is not a participle but a noun, "stockpile."
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "in him" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "brings" should be "tosses out."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "goods" is translated as plural but it is singular, "good."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "stored up" is not a participle but a noun, "stockpile."
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "in him" doesn't exist in the source.

Front Page Date: 

Nov 10 2020