Matthew 13:14 And in them is fulfilled the prophecy

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Parables, Sower, Understanding

Greek : 

Matthew 13:14 καὶ ἀναπληροῦται αὐτοῖς προφητεία Ἠσαίου λέγουσαἈκοῇ ἀκούσετε καὶ οὐ μὴ συνῆτε, καὶ βλέποντες βλέψετε καὶ οὐ μὴ ἴδητε.

Septuagint Isaiah 6:9, "ἀκοῇ ἀκούσετε καὶ οὐ μὴ συνῆτε καὶ βλέποντες βλέψετε καὶ οὐ μὴ ἴδητε."

Literal Verse: 

Also the prophecy of Isaiah is fulfilled by them saying that “By a sense of hearing, you all might hear and might never put it together and watching might watch, but you all might never see.”

My Takeaway: 

We trust in order to believe what we see and hear.

KJV : 

Matthew 13:14 And in them is fulfilled the prophecy of Esaias, which saith, By hearing ye shall hear, and shall not understand; and seeing ye shall see, and shall not perceive:

NIV : 

Matthew 13:14 In them is fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah: “ ‘You will be ever hearing but never understanding; you will be ever seeing but never perceiving.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The quote from Isaiah is the same Greek as found in the Septuagint Isaiah 6:9, but the Greek words are only an approximation of the original Hebrew. If Jesus spoke Aramaic, as the academics want him to, the record wouldn't be the exact words of the Septuagint. This verse offers good support for the Greek Hypothesis. After all Isaiah 6:9 is similar to Jeremiah 5:21 and Isaiah 44:18 and an exact translation from the Hebrew in any other language is very unlikely to be in the exact same words. Look at how differently this Greek is translated by the KJV and the NIV. For more, see this article about the Greek and Aramaic Hypotheses.

The NIV version of this tries to simplify it, making as grammatical misrepresentations as the verse has words. Of course, since Jesus was quoting the OT. Neither the KJV nor the NIV version is faithful to the OT versions.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ Iconj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἀναπληροῦται [1 verse](verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Is fulfilled" is anapleroo, which means "to fill up" a void, "to pay in full," "to supply," and "to make up." In the passive, it is "to be filled up," and "to be restored to its former size or state."

αὐτοῖς (adj pl masc dat) "In them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

(article sg fem nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

προφητεία [1 verse](noun sg fem nom) "The prophecy" in from propheteia meaning the "gift of interpreting the will of the gods," "gift of prophecy," "prophecy," and "oracular response."

Ἠσαίου [3 verses](proper name) "Esaias" is from the Greek Ēsaïas, which is the Greek word for the prophet Isaiah.

  - -  (adv)  "Which" is from hos, an adverb which means to "thus," "as," "how," "when," "where," "like," "just as," "so far as," "as much as can be," "that," "in order that," "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that." OR (article sg fem nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which, when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

λέγουσα (part sg pres act fem nom) "Saith" is from lego, which means "to recount," "to tell over," "to say," "to speak," "to teach," "to mean," "boast of," "tell of," "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself," "pick up," "gather," "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay," "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

Ἀκοῇ [3 verses](noun sg fem dat) "Hearing" is akoe, which means "hearing," "sound heard," "thing heard," "tidings," "sense of hearing," "act of hearing," "ear," "listening to," "obedience," "a hearing," and, in plural, "place where supernatural voices are heard,"

ἀκούσετε (2nd pl fut ind act or verb 2nd pl aor subj ) "Ye shall hear" is from akouo, which means "hear of," "hear tell of," "what one actually hears," "know by hearsay," "listen to," "give ear to," "hear and understand," and "understand."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

οὐ μὴ  (partic) "Not" is from ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

συνῆτε, (2nd pl pres subj act) "Understand" is syniemi which means "to bring together" or "to set together." It is also a metaphor for "perceive," "hear," and "understand" as we would say that we "put it all together" when figuring something out.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

βλέποντες (part pl pres act masc nom) "Seeing" is from of blepo, which means "to look," "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to rely on," "to look longingly," "to propose," "to beware," "to behold," and "to look for."

βλέψετε (verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye shall see" is from of blepo, which means "to look," "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to rely on," "to look longingly," "to propose," "to beware," "to behold," and "to look for."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

οὐ μὴ (partic) "Not" is from ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἴδητε. (verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Perceive" is from eido which means "to see," "to examine," "to perceive," "to behold," "to know how to do," "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

KJV Analysis: 

And  - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

in -- This word "in" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context. In the Greek, it can indicate they are an agent, so "by them."

them  - "Them" is from the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. The form is the plural, dative, usually used for indirect objects. This pronoun follows the verb, which makes more sense.

is -- This helping verb indicates the passive, present tense of the verb. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

fulfilled  -  (CW) "Fulfilled" is from a Greek verb that means "to fill up" a void, "to pay in full," "to supply," and "to make up."  This is not the word that is translated throughout the Bible as "fulfilled." This is the only time this word is used by Jesus. Elsewhere in the NT, this word is translated as "occupy," and "supply" as much as fulfilled.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

prophecy  - "Prophecy" in from propheteia meaning the "gift of interpreting the will of the gods." It is the subject of the sentence.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

Esaias, - "Esaias" is the Greek spelling of the English name, Isaiah.

which  - (CW)  This word could be the adverb that means "which," "how," "when," "where," "just as," "like," and related words, however, it is much more likely to the Greek article since its form matches the following word. -- The word translated as "which" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

saith,  - (WF) The word translated as "saith" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. Jesus usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching. Hear, it is in the form of an adjective modifying prophesy, but it is introduced by an article, "the one saying" or "the one teaching."

By  - - This word "by" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context. In the Greek, it can indicate they are an agent, so "by them."

hearing  - (CW) The Greek word translated as "hearing" is the noun describing the sense of hearing, the ear, and related ideas. One of its meanings is "obedience." As we say, "That child needs to listen to me."This is important because the original Hebrew word, shama, also has this sense of obedience, though it was a verb in the form of a command, rather than a noun. This word is only use by Jesus three times. It is not the common word translated as "hear," which is used below.

ye  - -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

hear,  - "Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.  It is the most common verb that Christ uses meaning "to hear." It also means "to listen" and "to understand."

and  - -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

shall -- (CW) This helping verb "shall" does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

not  - (CW) The "not" here is both forms of the Greek negative, the negative of fact and opinion used together. The sense is a more emphatic negative, as we might use "never."

understand;  - "Understand" is from a Greek verb which means "to bring together" or "to set together." It is also a metaphor for "perceive," "hear," and "understand" as we would say that we "put it all together" when figuring something out. It is in the past or possibly present potential tense, "might never."

and  - -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

seeing  - -- The verb translated as "seeing" means "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to beware," and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding so  "watch" works better. This is in the from of a plural, masculine adjective.

ye  - -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- (CW) This helping verb "shall" does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form

see, -- The verb translated as "seeing" means "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to beware," and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding so  "watch" works better. This is the active form of the verb.

and  - -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

not  - (CW) The "not" here is both forms of the Greek negative, the negative of fact and opinion used together. The sense is a more emphatic negative, as we might use "never."

perceive: -- The verb translated as "perceive" means "to see" but it is used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive." It is also in the form describing something that might happen, or, in this case, might never happen.

KJV Translation Issues: 

9
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "fulfill" is not the common word usually translated as "fulfill."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "which" is more like the article that means "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "saith" is not an active verb but a participle, "saying."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "hearing" is not the common word usually translated as "hearing."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The verb "shall," before "understand" does not indicate the future tense but a possibility requiring "should" or "might" as a helper verb.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is the more emphatic form, "never."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The verb "shall," before "hear" does not indicate the future tense but a possibility requiring "should" or "might" as a helper verb.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The verb "shall," before "perceive" does not indicate the future tense but a possibility requiring "should" or "might" as a helper verb.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The second "not" is the more emphatic form, "never."

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

In -- This word "in" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context. In the Greek, it can indicate they are an agent, so "by them."

them  - "Them" is from the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. The form is the plural, dative, usually used for indirect objects. This pronoun follows the verb, which makes more sense.

is -- This helping verb indicates the passive, present tense of the verb. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

fulfilled  -  (CW) "Fulfilled" is from a Greek verb that means "to fill up" a void, "to pay in full," "to supply," and "to make up."  This is not the word that is translated throughout the Bible as "fulfilled." This is the only time this word is used by Jesus. Elsewhere in the NT, this word is translated as "occupy," and "supply" as much as fulfilled.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

prophecy  - "Prophecy" in from propheteia meaning the "gift of interpreting the will of the gods." It is the subject of the sentence.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

Isaiah, - "Isaiah" is the Greek spelling of the English name, Isaiah.

untranslated "the one"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is adverb that means "which," "how," "when," "where," "just as," "like," and related words, however, it is much more likely to the Greek article since its form matches the following word. -- The word translated as "which" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "saying"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. Jesus usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching. Hear, it is in the form of an adjective modifying prophesy, but it is introduced by an article, "the one saying" or "the one teaching."

untranslated "Hearing"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "hearing" is the noun describing the sense of hearing, the ear, and related ideas. One of its meanings is "obedience." As we say, "That child needs to listen to me."This is important because the original Hebrew word, shama, also has this sense of obedience, though it was a verb in the form of a command, rather than a noun. This word is only use by Jesus three times. It is not the common word translated as "hear," which is used below.

You - -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will - --- (CW) This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be ever  - -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "be ever" in the Greek source. There is no passive verb and not word for "ever." This was added to create a rhyme with "never" in English.

hearing - (WF)  "Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.  It is the most common verb that Christ uses meaning "to hear." It also means "to listen" and "to understand." It is not a participle "hearing," but an active verb. It is not a participle, but an active verb.

but -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "but" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

never  - The "never" here is both forms of the Greek negative, the negative of fact and opinion used together. The sense is a more emphatic negative, as we might use "never."

understanding;  - (WF)  "Understand" is from a Greek verb which means "to bring together" or "to set together." It is also a metaphor for "perceive," "hear," and "understand" as we would say that we "put it all together" when figuring something out. It is in the past or possibly present potential tense, "might never."

untranslated "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

untranslated "seeing"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "seeing" means "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to beware," and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding so  "watch" works better. This is in the from of a plural, masculine adjective.

you - -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- (WW) This helping verb "shall" does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

be ever -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "be ever" in the Greek source. There is no passive verb and not word for "ever." This was added to create a rhyme with "never" in English.

seeing  -- (WF) The verb translated as "seeing" means "to see," "to look to," "to look like," "to beware," and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding so  "watch" works better. This is the active form of the verb in the from of possibility, "might see."

but - -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "but" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

never- (CW) The "not" here is both forms of the Greek negative, the negative of fact and opinion used together. The sense is a more emphatic negative, as we might use "never."

perceiving: -- (WF) The verb translated as "perceiving" means "to see" but it is used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive." It is also in the form describing something that might happen, or, in this case, might never happen. This is the active form of the verb in the from of possibility, "might see."

NIV Translation Issues: 

19
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "fulfill" is not the common word usually translated as "fulfill."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "which" is more like the article that means "the one."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "saying" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "hearing" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "will" before "ever be" should be "might."
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "be ever" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "hearing" is not a participle but an active verb, "hear."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "but" should be "and."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "understanding" is not a participle but an active verb, "understand."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" after "understanding" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "seeing" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "will" before "ever be" should be "might."
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "be ever" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "seeing" is not a participle but an active verb, "see."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "but" should be "and."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is the more emphatic form, "never."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "perceiving" is not a participle but an active verb, "perceive."

Front Page Date: 

Dec 3 2020