Matthew 17:9 Tell the vision to no man,

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

After the transfiguration and coming down from mountain.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

To no one should you tell this sight until of it the son of the man from the dead might be raised.

My Takeaway: 

There are somethings we shouldn't talk about until we understand them more fully.

KJV : 

Matthew 17:9 Tell the vision to no man, until the Son of man be risen again from the dead.

NIV : 

Matthew 17:9 Don’t tell anyone what you have seen, until the Son of Man has been raised from the dead.”

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is not a command, but a suggestion, like the beginning of the previous verse. In Greek, these suggestions have a more light-hearted feel than the commands in the translation. There is an untranslated "of it" here that connects Jesus's resurrection to this vision.  The use of "vision" here carries both the sense that the transfiguration was both real and an illusion which is consistent with the Greek, however, more commonly it just means a "sight." The final "risen/raised" is a subjective verb about something that might happen at some time. It is not in the future or the past perfect tense, which would make it more of a prophecy.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Μηδενὶ [7 verses](adj sg dat) "No man" is medeis, which means "nobody," "no one," "not even one," "naught," "good for naught," and "nothing."

εἴπητε [162 verses] (verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Tell" is eipon, which means "to speak," "to say," "to recite," "to address," "to mention," "to name," "to proclaim," "to plead," "to promise," and "to offer."

τὸ (article sg neut acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ὅραμα [1 verse](noun sg neut acc) "Vision" is horama, which means "a sight," "a visible object," "a spectacle," "a vision," and "a dream."

ἕως [63 verses](adv) "Until" is heos which means "until," "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that."

οὗ (pron sg neut/masc gen) Untranslated is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

(article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

υἱὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἐκ (prep) "From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from."

νεκρῶν [23 verses](adj pl masc gen) "Dead" is nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person," "the dead as dwellers in the nether world," "the inanimate," and "the inorganic."

ἐγερθῇ [29 verses](verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "Be risen" is anistemi, which means "to make stand up," "to raise up," "to raise from sleep," "to wake up," "to raise from the dead," "to rouse to action," "to put up for sale," "to make people rise," "to emigrate," "to transplant," and "to rise and leave the sanctuary."

KJV Analysis: 

missing "you"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is from the second-person, plural form of the verb. This is not a command but a subjective statement.

missing "should"  -- (MW) The helping verb is required because the verb describes a possibility, being the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate.

Tell - The word translated as "tell" means "to say" and "to speak." It is one of the two most common words translated "speak," "say" and "tell," but it has more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

vision - "Vision" is from a noun that means "a sight," "a visible object," "a spectacle," "a vision," and "a dream."

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

no man, - The Greek word translated as "no man" here means "no one" and "nothing."

until  - -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "in order that."  

missing "of it"  -- (MW) There is an untranslated neuter, possessive pronoun. It refers to the word "vision" or "sight." This suggests that this vision is part or connected to Jesus's resurrection. 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant." The phrase "the son of man" is the common way Jesus refers to himself. It is discussed in detail in this article. Its sense may be "the child of the man."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of," "which is," "than" (in comparisons), or  "for," "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

man - The Greek word for "man" means "man," "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men," "people," and "peoples." 

missing "should"  -- (MW) The helping verb is required because the verb describes a possibility, being the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

risen  - (CW) "Risen" is from a verb that means of "to rouse from sleep," "to raise from the dead," "to make ascend," and "to rise up and go away." It is passive and, interestingly, it is not in the future tense. It is in a tense indicating something that happens at a specific point in time, past, present, or future. It is usually translated as the past in English.

again -- (IW) There is nothing in the Greek that can be translated as "again" in the Greek source.

from  - The Greek preposition translated as "from" means "out of" of "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

the -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

dead.  - The word translated as the dead" means "corpse" and "a dying man." This is different from the word used just a few verses ago to describe the apostles' death.

KJV Translation Issues: 

7
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "should" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of it" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "should" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "risen" means "to raise," and it is passive so it is not something he does for himself.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "again" doesn't exist in the source.

NIV Analysis: 

missing "you"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is from the second-person, plural form of the verb. This is not a command but a subjective statement.

missing "should"  -- (MW) The helping verb is required because the verb describes a possibility, being the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate.

Do-  - -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

n’t -- (CW) There is no negative applied to the verb but to the pronoun.

tell - The word translated as "tell" means "to say" and "to speak." It is one of the two most common words translated "speak," "say" and "tell," but it has more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

anyone  - - (CW) The Greek word translated as "no man" here means "no one" and "nothing."

what -- (WW) The word translated as "what" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

you have  - -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "you have" in the Greek source.

seen- (WF) "Seen" is from a noun that means "a sight," "a visible object," "a spectacle," "a vision," and "a dream." It is a noun not a verb.

until  - -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "in order that."  

missing "of it"  -- (MW) There is an untranslated neuter, possessive pronoun. It refers to the word "vision" or "sight." This suggests that this vision is part or connected to Jesus's resurrection. 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant." The phrase "the son of man" is the common way Jesus refers to himself. It is discussed in detail in this article. Its sense may be "the child of the man."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of," "which is," "than" (in comparisons), or  "for," "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

Man - The Greek word for "man" means "man," "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men," "people," and "peoples." 

missing "should"  -- (MW) The helping verb is required because the verb describes a possibility, being the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate.

has -- (WT) This helping verb "has" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb here.

been -- This helping verb "been " indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

raised - "Raised" is from a verb that means of "to rouse from sleep," "to raise from the dead," "to make ascend," and "to rise up and go away." It is passive and, interestingly, it is not in the future tense. It is in a tense indicating something that happens at a specific point in time, past, present, or future. It is usually translated as the past in English.

from  - The Greek preposition translated as "from" means "out of" of "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

the -- There is no Greek article "the" here in the source, but the noun is plural and in English an article is used before plural nouns in phrases like this.

dead.  - The word translated as the dead" means "corpse" and "a dying man." This is different from the word used just a few verses ago to describe the apostles' death.

NIV Translation Issues: 

11
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "should" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is not the common word usually translated as "not."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "anyone" is not the common word usually translated as "anyone."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "what" should be "the."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "you have" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "seen" is not an active verb but a noun "vision."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of it" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "should" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" indicates the past perfect tense, but the tense is something that happens at a specific point in time (past, present, or future).

Front Page Date: 

Feb 22 2021