Matthew 18:8 Wherefore if your hand or your foot offend thee,

Spoken to: 

group

Context: 

Speaking about the traps of life

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

If, however, that hand of yours or that foot of yours trips you up, cut it out and toss [it] from you! It is good for you to show up into this life limping and deformed than, having two hands or two feet, to be tossed into this pyre, this perpetual one.

My Takeaway: 

Ideas from the Sermon were worked on an developed over time.

KJV : 

Matthew 18:8 Wherefore if thy hand or thy foot offend thee, cut them off, and cast from thee: it is better for thee to enter into life halt or maimed, rather than having two hands or two feet to be cast into everlasting fire.

NIV : 

Matthew 18:8 If your hand or your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life maimed or crippled than to have two hands or two feet and be thrown into eternal fire.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In the KJV, this verse sounds very threatening, but in Greek, it is clearly meant to be a humorous exaggeration and light play on words. Jesus uses a very similar, but less complex line in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:30) so this line was clearly part of his routine and was polished over the years.  Add "foot" to it makes it easier to perform the "tripping up" joke that is part of it.  In this version, he adds a play on words, good versus maimed and halt, which in Greek is kalos versus kullos and cholos. The repetition of five "ors" is also a humorous technique.  See this article on Jesus's Humor.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "cut..off" primarily means to stop, Christ plays on both sense of the word here. Stopping what we are doing and cutting off our body parts. A play on word sounds in good versus maimed and halt, which in Greek is kalos versus kullos and cholos. The repetition of five "ors" is also a humorous technique.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Εἰ (conj)"If" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

δὲ (conj/adv)"But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

(article)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

χείρ [25 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Hand" is cheir,  which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

σου (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is sou is the genitive form of the second-person, singular pronoun that means "of you" and "your." 

(conj) "Or" is from e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

(article sg masc nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

πούς [19 verses](noun sg masc nom) "Foot" is pous, which means a "foot", "a talon [of a bird]," and the concept of "to trample" or "to tred upon." -- The word translated as "feet" refers to human feet, birds's talons, and trampling things. It was the Jewish

σου (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is sou is the genitive form of the second-person, singular pronoun that means "of you" and "your." 

σκανδαλίζει [20 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Offends" is from skandalizô, which means "to cause someone to stumble" and "to give offense." It is from skandalon, which means a "trap" or "snare" for an enemy. This is one of the words that starts with the Greek version of the Old Testament from the Hebrew word for "noose" or "snare." See the article for more.

σε, (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from su which means "you" and "your."

ἔκκοψον [5 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Cut...off" is ekkoptô, which means "to cut out", "knock out", "to make an end to," and "to bring to a stop." It has much the same meaning as when you tell someone, to "cut it out!"

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

βάλε [54 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Cast" is from ballo, which means "to throw", "to let fall," "to cast," "to put", "to pour", "to place money on deposit", "push forward or in front [of animals]", "to shed", "to place", "to pay,"to throw [of dice,]" "to be lucky", "to fall", "to lay as foundation", "to begin to form", "to dash oneself with water," and "to bathe."

ἀπὸ (prep) "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

σοῦ: (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thee" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

καλόν [48 verses](adj sg neut nom) "Better" is from kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "beautiful", "fair", "good", "auspicious", "moral beauty", "virtue," (of good fortune) "well," "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

σοί (pron 2nd sg dat) "For thee" is from soi which is the singular, second person pronoun, "you".

ἐστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible."

εἰσελθεῖν [68 verses](verb aor inf act) "To enter" is from eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the")

ζωὴν [42 verses] (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is from zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

κυλλὸν [2 verses] (adj sg masc acc) "Maimed" is kullos, which means "club-footed", "deformed", "crooked," and "crippled."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

χωλόν, [6 verses](adj sg masc acc) "Halt" is chôlos, which means "lame", "limping," and "defective." A very similar word, cholos, which means "gall", "bitter", "angry," and "wrathful."

(conj) "Rather than" is from e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

δύο [36 verses](numeral) "Two" is duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

χεῖρας [25 verses](noun pl fem acc) "Hands" is cheir which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

(conj) "Or" is from e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

δύο [36 verses](numeral) "Two" is duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

πόδας [19 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Feet" is from pous, which means a "foot", "a talon [of a bird]," and the concept of "to trample" or "to tred upon."

ἔχοντα (part sg pres act masc acc) "Have" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." -- The word translated as "have" means "to possess" or "to keep" but it isn't used in the same way as a "helper" verb than the English "have" is.

βληθῆναι [54 verses](verb aor inf pass) "To be cast" is from ballo, which means "to throw", "to let fall," "to cast," "to put", "to pour", "to place money on deposit", "push forward or in front [of animals]", "to shed", "to place", "to pay,"to throw [of dice,]" "to be lucky", "to fall", "to lay as foundation", "to begin to form", "to dash oneself with water," and "to bathe."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὸ (article sg neut acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the")

πῦρ .[16 verses](noun sg neut acc) "Fire" is from pyr (pur), which means "fire", "sacrificial fire", "funeral fire", "hearth-fire", "lightning", "the light of torches," and "heat of fever."

τὸ (article sg neut acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the")

αἰώνιον. [23 verses](adj sg neut acc) "Everlasting" is aionios, which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age."

KJV Analysis: 

Wherefore -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "wherefore" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

if  - The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not.

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

hand -- The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

foot -- The word translated as "feet" refers to human feet, birds's talons, and trampling things.

offend -- "Offend" is a verb that means "to cause to stumble" or "to trip up." From there it is assumed by its translators to mean "to give offense" and "to scandalize." Our word "scandalize" comes directly from Greek. However, this interpretation of the word only comes from the translators of the Gospels. This is a Koine word that is found originally only in the New Testament, but based on a noun found only in the Greek Old Testament meaning "snare," or "stumbling block."  In English, we would simply say, "trips up" capturing the same idea exactly. See the article on this word here.

thee, -- The word translated as "you" is the objective form of the second-person, singular pronoun.

cut  - "Cut off" is from a verb that means "to cut out", "knock out", "to make an end to," and "to bring to a stop." It has much the same meaning as when you tell someone, to "cut it out!" The listener wouldn't even think of the "cutting off" meaning until the "throw" is added, especially since the pronoun is not them, but "it."

them -- (WN) The word translated as "them" is actually singular, "it." This works better because the sense here is to stop what you are doing and drop "it", while the wordplay makes it sound like cutting off your members.

off, -- This is from the prefix of the previous verb that means "from."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

cast  -- The word translated as "cast" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Jesus often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. The term used for "cast" also means "drop it" like we would drop a bad habit.

from  - The word translated as "from" means "from" in both locations and when referring to a source or a cause. It also means the instrument "by" which a thing is done and "away from."

thee: -- The word translated as "you" is the form of the second-person, singular pronoun that goes with the preposition.

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is  - When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence without a subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

better - (WF) The word translated as "better" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." It is not in the comparative form. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context.

thee -- The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the singular, second-person pronoun. 

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

enter  - "Enter" is from a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."

into  - The word translated as "into" means into a place, but generally takes its "to" and "into" meaning from the context. In English, we would say "through" life but the "into" here is intentional.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  Jesus is talking about a specific type of life.

life -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life. For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

halt  - "Halt" is from an adjective that means "lame", "limping," and "defective." It is a rare word for Jesus only used for wordplay.

or - "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

maimed, -  "Maimed" is from an adjective means "club-footed", "deformed", "crooked," and "crippled."

rather than - "Rather than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

having -- The word translated as "have" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and many specific uses.

two -- The "two" is the numeral, "two," which, like numbers in English, plays a lot of roles.

hands -- The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

two -- The "two" is the numeral, "two," which, like numbers in English, plays a lot of roles.

feet -- The word translated as "feet" refers to human feet, birds's talons, and trampling things. It was the Jewish

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

cast -- The word translated as "cast" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Jesus often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. The term used for "cast" also means "drop it" like we would drop a bad habit.

into - The word translated as "into" means into a place, but generally takes its "to" and "into" meaning from the context. In English, we would say "through" life but the "into" here is intentional.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the" or, with an adjective as we see here, "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  Jesus is talking about a specific type of life.

everlasting  -   "Everlasting" is from an adjective that means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age." This is used to describe the trashed dump outside Jerusalem that was always burning.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  Jesus is talking about a specific type of life.

fire.  -- "Fire" is from the noun that means "fire", "sacrificial fire", "funeral fire", "hearthfire", "lightning", "the light of torches," and "heat of fever." It is the word basis for our word "pyre." Again, Jesus is describing a specific fire.

KJV Translation Issues: 

8
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "wherefore" is the common word usually translated as "but."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "hand" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "foot" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "them" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "better" is not a comparative form.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "life" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "everlasting" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "fire" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

missing "however"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "however" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

If - The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not.

your -- The word translated as "thy" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

hand -- The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

your -- The word translated as "thy" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

foot -- The word translated as "feet" refers to human feet, birds's talons, and trampling things.

causes  - "Causes...to stumble" is a verb that means "to cause to stumble" or "to trip up." From there it is assumed by its translators to mean "to give offense" and "to scandalize." Our word "scandalize" comes directly from Greek. However, this interpretation of the word only comes from the translators of the Gospels. This is a Koine word that is found originally only in the New Testament, but based on a noun found only in the Greek Old Testament meaning "snare," or "stumbling block."  In English, we would simply say, "trips up" capturing the same idea exactly. See the article on this word here.

you , -- The word translated as "you" is the objective form of the second-person, singular pronoun.

to stumble-- This infinitive finishes the meaning of the verb "causes" above.

cut  - "Cut off" is from a verb that means "to cut out", "knock out", "to make an end to," and "to bring to a stop." It has much the same meaning as when you tell someone, to "cut it out!" The listener wouldn't even think of the "cutting off" meaning until the "throw" is added, especially since the pronoun is not them, but "it."

it -- The word translated as "them" is actually singular, "it." This works better because the sense here is to stop what you are doing and drop "it", while the wordplay makes it sound like cutting off your members.

off, -- This is from the prefix of the previous verb that means "from."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

throw -- The word translated as "cast" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Jesus often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. The term used for "cast" also means "drop it" like we would drop a bad habit.

it -- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

away - (CW) The word translated as "away " means "from" in both locations and when referring to a source or a cause. It also means the instrument "by" which a thing is done and "away from." This doesn't have the same connotations as "throw away" in English.

untranslated "you"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "you" is the form of the second-person, singular pronoun that goes with the preposition.

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is  - When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence without a subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

better - (WF) The word translated as "better" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." It is not in the comparative form. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context.

you -- The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the singular, second-person pronoun. 

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

enter  - "Enter" is from a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."

untranslated "into"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "into" means into a place, but generally takes its "to" and "into" meaning from the context. In English, we would say "through" life but the "into" here is intentional.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  Jesus is talking about a specific type of life.

life -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life. For more on how Christ uses this word with other words about human existence (soul, heart, spirits, etc.), read this article.

maimed - "Maimed " is from an adjective that means "lame", "limping," and "defective." It is a rare word for Jesus only used for wordplay.

or - "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

crippled , -  "Crippled " is from an adjective means "club-footed", "deformed", "crooked," and "crippled."

than - "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English. However, this is not the verb form following though  it is the one later.

have -- (WF) The word translated as "have" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and many specific uses. It is a participle, not an infinitive.

two -- The "two" is the numeral, "two," which, like numbers in English, plays a lot of roles.

hands -- The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

or -- "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

two -- The "two" is the numeral, "two," which, like numbers in English, plays a lot of roles.

feet -- The word translated as "feet" refers to human feet, birds' talons, and trampling things. It was the Jewish

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

and -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "and" in the Greek source. It was added because the previous verb was translated as an infinitive rather than a participle.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

thrown -- The word translated as "thrown " has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Jesus often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. The term used for "cast" also means "drop it" like we would drop a bad habit.

into - The word translated as "into" means into a place, but generally takes its "to" and "into" meaning from the context. In English, we would say "through" life but the "into" here is intentional.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the" or, with an adjective as we see here, "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  Jesus is talking about a specific type of life.

eternal -   "Everlasting" is from an adjective that means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age." This is used to describe the trashed dump outside Jerusalem that was always burning.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  Jesus is talking about a specific type of life.

fire.  -- "Fire" is from the noun that means "fire", "sacrificial fire", "funeral fire", "hearthfire", "lightning", "the light of torches," and "heat of fever." It is the word basis for our word "pyre." Again, Jesus is describing a specific fire.

NIV Translation Issues: 

12
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "however" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "hand" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "foot" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "away" is the common word usually translated as "from."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "better" is not a comparative form.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "into" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "life" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "have" is not an infinitive but a participle, "having."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "into" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "everlasting" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "fire" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Mar 21 2021