Matthew 19:12 For there are some eunuchs,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Teaching about marriage and divorce.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

There are, consequently, sexless who from a belly of a mother were born in this way. And there are sexless who been desexed by those men. And there are [them] desexing themselves by the realm of the skies. The one being able himself to digest [this], him must digest [it].
OR
Let he who has himself the ability to make room [for another], let him make room.

My Takeaway: 

If we can accept a burden that is good for us, we must.

KJV : 

Matthew 19:12 For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it.

NIV : 

Matthew 19:12 For there are eunuchs who were born that way, and there are eunuchs who have been made eunuchs by others—and there are those who choose to live like eunuchs for the sake of the kingdom of heaven. The one who can accept this should accept it.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There is a unique word for Jesus here, "eunuchs," that is used in both the form of a noun and a verb is adopted from Greek rather than untranslated. The noun form was used before Jesus, but the use of the verb originates here, though it was used after. The word literally means "bed holder," some humorously, since eunuchs were original guards of a king's harem. The word means "sexless."  There is a common Greek word for "castrate" that Jesus does not use here. Instead, he invents a word, making "to make a eunuch" or "desex."

Another rare verb, translated as "receive/accept" is used twice here, in two different forms at the end of the verse. This word is essentially comical, having the sense of being able to "stomach" something or "digest" something the way that Jesus uses it.   Using this verb twice in a row, in two different forms, is especially humorous. "If you can stomach it, you must stomach it."  The last phrase has two very different serious meanings making it a good example of Jesus's wordplay. Humorous meaning aside, the verb means both "to contain" and "to make room for another." The last line can have both meanings at once when referring to staying married. We must both make room for another and contain ourselves. So, "if you can contain it [sexual desire], you must contain it," or "If you can make room [for another], you must make room."

Wordplay: 

 The made-up word for "eunuchified" is used instead of the common Greek words for "to castrate."

The word translated as "receive" means both "to contain" and "to make room for another." The last line can have both meanings at once when referring to staying married. We must both make room for another and contain ourselves. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

εἰσὶν (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "There are" is from eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," and "is possible."

γὰρ (conj) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

εὐνοῦχοι [1 verse][1st historical use](noun pl masc nom) "Eunuchs" is eunouchos, which "castrated person," "eunuch, and "(of dates) without stones." It means literally "bed watcher," that is, acting as a chamberlain, referring to the fact that castrated men were used as guards for woman's bedrooms.

οἵτινες [90 verses](pron pl masc nom) "Which" is from hostis, which means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

ἐκ (pro)"From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of," "from," "by," "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond," "outside of," "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after," "from;" 4) [of rest] "on," "in," 5) [of time] "since," "from," "at," "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of," "made from."

κοιλίας [6 verses ](noun sg fem gen) "Womb" is from the Greek, koilia, which means the "cavity within the body" (from the Greek, koilos, for "hollow"). It means both the belly, the intestines, and the womb. The word is also used to mean "excrement," which fills the hollow.

μητρὸς [27 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Mother" is meter, which means "mother," "grandmother," "mother hen," "source," and "origin."

ἐγεννήθησαν [10 verse](verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Born" is gennao, which means "to beget," "to bring forth," "to produce from oneself," "to create," and "to engender." This is the causal form of gignomai, which is translated as "done" in the NT, but which comes closer in meaning to "become."

οὕτως, [137 verses](adv) "Were so" is from houtos, which means as an adverb, it means "in this way," "therefore," "so much," "to such an extent," and "that is why."

καὶ (conj/adv)"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

εἰσὶν (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "There are" is from eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," and "is possible."

εὐνοῦχοι [1 verse][1st historical use](noun pl masc nom) "Eunuchs" is from eunouchos, which means literally "bed watcher," that is, acting as a chamberlain, referring to the fact that castrated men were used as guards for woman's bedrooms. Again, the word itself is somewhat of a joke, meaning, literally, "bed" (from εὐνή, a Greek word not otherwise used in the Gospels) and "having charge of" one of the meanings of echo, the common verb meaning "to have."

οἵτινες [90 verses](pron pl masc nom) "Which" is from hostis, which means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

εὐνουχίσθησαν [1 verse][1st historical use](verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Made eunuchs" is from a verb form of the word for eunuchs, eunouchizô, that is taken to mean "castrate," but which is only used here in the NT. The normal words for referring to castration are anorchos (without testicles), or alithos (without stones).

ὑπὸ (prep) "Of" is from hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)," "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by," "under," or "with," "under the cover or protection of," "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate," "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection," "control," "dependence," of Time, "in the course of," "during," "about," as an adverb, "under," "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by," "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause).

τῶν (article pl masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἀνθρώπων, [209 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Men" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

καὶ (prep) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

εἰσὶν (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "There are" is from eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," and "is possible."

εὐνούχισαν [1 verse][1st historical use](part sg aor act neut nom) "Made eunuchs" is from a verb form of the word for eunuchs, eunouchizô, that is taken to mean "castrate," but which is only used here in the NT.

ἑαυτοὺς [75 verses](adj pl masc acc) "Themselves" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself," "herself," "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

διὰ [88 verses](prep) "For" is from dia which means "through," "in the midst of," "in a line (movement)," "throughout (time)," "by (causal)," "among," and "between."

τὴν (article sg fem acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

βασιλείαν (noun sg fem acc) "The kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom," "dominion," "hereditary monarchy," "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τῶν (article pl masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

οὐρανῶν. (noun pl masc gen) "Of Heaven" is from the Greek ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky," "heaven as the seat of the gods," "the sky," "the universe," and "the climate." -

(article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

δυνάμενος (part sg pres mp masc nom) "He that is able" is from the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities," "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

χωρεῖν [5 verses](verb pres inf act) "To receive" is from choreo, which means "to leave room for another," "to make way," "to withdraw," "to go forward," "to make progress," "to advance," "to proceed," [of gold] "to be spent," "to have room for," "to hold," "to contain," and "to be capable of."

χωρείτω. [5 verses](verb 3rd sg pres imperat act) "Let him receive is from choreo, which means "to leave room for another," "to make way," "to withdraw," "to go forward," "to make progress," "to advance," "to proceed," [of gold] "to be spent," "to have room for," "to hold," "to contain," and "to be capable of."

KJV Analysis: 

For  - The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

there  - -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

are  - It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

some -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "some" in the Greek source.

eunuchs,  - (UW) The word eunuch is taken from Greek rather than translated. It means literally a "bed holder," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, means "sexless."   On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

which -- "Which" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

were -- This helping verb "were" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

so  - -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "so" in the Greek source.

born  - The word translated as "born" means "to beget," "to bring forth," "to produce from oneself," and "to engender."

from -- The Greek preposition translated as "from" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

their -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "their" in the Greek source.

mother  - -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

's -- This "'s"  comes from the genitive case of the word that requires the addition of a possessive in English. 

womb:  - The word translated as "womb" means both the belly, the intestines, and the womb, meaning any hollow within the body. The word is also used to mean "excrement," which fills the hollow.

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

there  - -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

are  - It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

some -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "some" in the Greek source.

eunuchs,  - (UW) The word eunuch is taken from Greek rather than translated. It means literally a "bed holder," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, means "sexless."   On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

which -- "Which" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

were -- This helping verb "were" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

made eunuchs  - (UW) The word translated as "made eunuchs" is from a verb formed from the noun for "eunuch,  which means "sexless" and adopted from Greek rather than translated. This verb form is only used here in the testament, where is it used not once, but twice in this verse. It is like someone today might make up the word "eunuchized." The form here is passive, "were eunuchized" or "were desexed."

of  - (CW) The word translated as "of," when used with a passive verb, indicates a cause with passive verbs, "by," or "under control of."

men:  - The Greek word for "men" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

there  - -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

be - (WN) It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." The verb is not singular but plural.

eunuchs, - (UW) The word eunuch is taken from Greek rather than translated. It means literally a "bed holder," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, means "sexless."   On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

which -- "Which" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

have -- (WT) This helping verb "have" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb here.

made  -  (UW, WF) The word translated as "made eunuchs" is from a verb formed from the noun for "eunuch,  which means "sexless" and adopted from Greek rather than translated. This verb form is only used here in the testament, where is it used not once, but twice in this verse. It is like someone today might make up the word "eunuchized." The form here is a participle,

themselves  - -- "Themselves" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself," "herself," and so on. Here, it is a plural, masculine, noun.

eunuchs  - This finishes the idea of the verb.

for  - (WW) The word translated as "for" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." It is not the word that is ever used to say "for the sake" of something. Here the "by a cause" used seems the most obvious.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

kingdom -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Jesus does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

heaven: - (WN) The word translated as "heaven" means "sky," the "climate," and the "universe."     It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article.  This word is plural, not singular, so "skies." 

's sake. -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "it" in the Greek source. There is a special preposition in Greek that gives this sense to a phrase and it is not used here.

He -- The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

that is -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "it" in the Greek source. It was added because the previous verb was translated as active rather than a participle.

able  - (WF)  "Able" is from another verbal noun or adjective. The verb means "having the power or ability" to do something. It is often translated as "can" in the NT. It is in the form that is either passive or someone acting on themselves, "being able" "being able himself."

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

receive  - (CW) The repetition of "receive" is from the repetition of the same verb in two different forms, but that word has three meanings none of them really "receive." It means 1) having the capacity to contain something, 2) making progress, and 3) making way or room for someone or something else. So the sense is similar to how we say, you can "stomach" or "digest" something. Humorous meaning aside, the word means both "to contain" and "to make room for another." The last line can have both meanings at once when referring to staying married. We must both make room for another and contain ourselves. This word is an infinitive.

it, -- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

let -- This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second-person. This form is used as something like our word "must."

him -- (WF) This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb. This is the subject of the verb, not the objcct.

receive  - - (CW) The repetition of "receive" is from the repetition of the same verb in two different forms, but that word has three meanings none of them really "receive." It means 1) having the capacity to contain something, 2) making progress, and 3) making way or room for someone or something else. So the sense is similar to how we say, you can "stomach" or "digest" something. Humorous meaning aside, the word means both "to contain" and "to make room for another." The last line can have both meanings at once when referring to staying married. We must both make room for another and contain ourselves. 

it.  - -- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

KJV Translation Issues: 

20
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "some" doesn't exist in the source.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "so" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "their" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "some" doesn't exist in the source.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "made eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "of" is not the word form usually translated as "of."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "be" is translated as singular but the Greek word is plural, "are."
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" indicates the past perfect tense, but the tense is something that happens at a specific point in time (past, present, or future).
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "made eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "made eunuchs" is not an active verb but a participle, "desexing."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for" should be "by."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but the Greek word is plural, "skies."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word " 's sake" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "able" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the common word usually translated as "receive."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "him" should be a subject, "he," not an object.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "receive" is not the common word usually translated as "receive."

NIV Analysis: 

For  - The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

there  - -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

are  - It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

eunuchs,  - (UW) The word eunuch is taken from Greek rather than translated. It means literally a "bed holder," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, means "sexless."   On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

who -- "Which" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

were -- This helping verb "were" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

born  - The word translated as "born" means "to beget," "to bring forth," "to produce from oneself," and "to engender."

that way  - -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "so" in the Greek source.

missing "from"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "from" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

missing "mother"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

missing "womb"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "womb" means both the belly, the intestines, and the womb, meaning any hollow within the body. The word is also used to mean "excrement," which fills the hollow.

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

there  - -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

are  - It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

eunuchs,  - (UW) The word eunuch is taken from Greek rather than translated. It means literally a "bed holder," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, means "sexless."   On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

who -- "Which" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

have -- (WT) This helping verb "have" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb here.

been -- This helping verb "were" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

made eunuchs  - (UW) The word translated as "made eunuchs" is from a verb formed from the noun for "eunuch,  which means "sexless" and adopted from Greek rather than translated. This verb form is only used here in the testament, where is it used not once, but twice in this verse. It is like someone today might make up the word "eunuchized." The form here is passive, "were eunuchized" or "were desexed."

by -   The word translated as "by," when used with a passive verb, indicates a cause with passive verbs, "by," or "under control of."

others:  - (WW) The Greek word for "others" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

there  - -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

are -  It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." The verb is not singular but plural.

those  - -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "those" in the Greek source.

who -- "Who" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

choose to live like - -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "choose to live like " in the Greek source.

eunuchs, - (UW) The word eunuch is taken from Greek rather than translated. It means literally a "bed holder," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, means "sexless."   On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

missing "desexing"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "desexing" is from a verb formed from the noun for "eunuch,  which means "sexless" and adopted from Greek rather than translated. This verb form is only used here in the testament, where is it used not once, but twice in this verse. It is like someone today might make up the word "eunuchized." The form here is a participle.

missing "themselves  "  -- (MW) The untranslated word "themselves" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself," "herself," and so on. Here, it is a plural, masculine, noun.

 for the sake  - (WW) The word translated as "for" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." It is not the word that is ever used to say "for the sake" of something. Here the "by a cause" used seems the most obvious. There is nothing that can be translated as "it" in the Greek source. There is a special preposition in Greek that gives this sense to a phrase and it is not used here.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

kingdom -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Jesus does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

heaven: - (WN) The word translated as "heaven" means "sky," the "climate," and the "universe."     It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article.  This word is plural, not singular, so "skies."

The one -- The word translated as "the one" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who" in the Greek source. It was added because the previous verb was translated as active rather than a participle.

can - (WF) "Can" is from another verbal noun or adjective. The verb means "having the power or ability" to do something. It is often translated as "can" in the NT. t is in the form that is either passive or someone acting on themselves, "being able" "being able himself."

accept - (CW, WF) The repetition of "accept" is from the repetition of the same verb in two different forms, but that word has three meanings none of them really "accept." It means 1) having the capacity to contain something, 2) making progress, and 3) making way or room for someone or something else. So the sense is similar to how we say, you can "stomach" or "digest" something. Humorous meaning aside, the word means both "to contain" and "to make room for another." The last line can have both meanings at once when referring to staying married. We must both make room for another and contain ourselves. This word is an infinitive.

this , -- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

should --  (WW) This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second-person. This form is used as something like our word "must."

accept - - (CW) The repetition of "accept " is from the repetition of the same verb in two different forms, but that word has three meanings none of them really "accept ." It means 1) having the capacity to contain something, 2) making progress, and 3) making way or room for someone or something else. So the sense is similar to how we say, you can "stomach" or "digest" something. Humorous meaning aside, the word means both "to contain" and "to make room for another." The last line can have both meanings at once when referring to staying married. We must both make room for another and contain ourselves. 

it.  - -- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

NIV Translation Issues: 

22
  1. UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  2. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that way" doesn't exist in the source.
  3. MW - Missing Word -- The word "from" is not shown in the English translation.
  4. MW - Missing Word -- The word "mother" is not shown in the English translation.
  5. MW - Missing Word -- The word "womb" is not shown in the English translation.
  6. UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  7. WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" indicates the past perfect tense, but the tense is something that happens at a specific point in time (past, present, or future).
  8. UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "made eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  9. WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "others" should be "men."
  10. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "those" doesn't exist in the source.
  11. IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "choose to live like" doesn't exist in the source.
  12. MW - Missing Word -- The word "desexing" is not shown in the English translation.
  13. MW - Missing Word -- The word "themselves" is not shown in the English translation.
  14. UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "eunuchs" means "sexless." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  15. WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for the sake" should be "by."
  16. WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but the Greek word is plural, "skies."
  17. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" doesn't exist in the source.
  18. WF - Wrong Form -  The "able" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able."
  19. CW - Confusing Word -- The "accept" is not the common word usually translated as "accept."
  20. WF - Wrong Form -  The "accept" is not an active verb but a participle, "to stomach."
  21. WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "should" should be "must."
  22. CW - Confusing Word -- The "accept" is not the common word usually translated as "accept."

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

Jesus offers only one alternative to marriage, abstaining from sex, however, the term here doesn't describe this as a passive, inactive role.

Jesus says that people can abstain from sex either because they are born disinterested in sex, because they are desexed by others, or because they are able to desex themselves but only by heaven's power. None of these states are controlled by one's own power. However, the decision to accept this is different. People may have the power within themselves to accept this or not. This seems to indicate the "make room for another" interpretation AND to contain themselves to the degree they have no need to divorce their wives, the larger topic here.

The bottom line of this section is that, yes, marriage is difficult, but we can "contain ourselves" and "make room for another" if we give ourselves the power. The alternative, that is, "bed watching," is only possible by powers outside of ourselves. As Jesus started by saying, men and women were created to be together. This is our nature no matter how difficult it is to stay together. Making room for another is difficult and doesn't get any easier by changing partners.

Jesus may be referring here to gay people, people born without an interest in the opposite sex as well as being made that way by men or by heaven. After all, how many people are born without sex organs entirely? Not many. However, if this does refer to gay people, the message is clearly are desexed, in the sense that they do not interact productively with the opposite sex. What we called "sex" between males like masturbation would be defined in his era as avoiding sex rather than having it.

Front Page Date: 

Apr 23 2021