Matthew 5:24 Leave there your gift before the altar,

Spoken to: 

an individual

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, murder and anger, visible sacrifice and invisible sacrifice

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Drop there the gift of yours in front of the altar and go! First, settle with that brother of yours and then, showing up, present your offering!

KJV : 

Matthew 5:24 Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift.​

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Again, this verse is addressed to an individual with a singular "you" not the plural "you" used for crowds.

The verb translated as "reconciled" here is only used once by Jesus. It means, literally, "through an exchange" and has the sense of changing a relationship by making a trade. This word appears in Greek Septuagint versions of 1Samuel 29:4, but it doesn't appear in the Strong's, which is meant to define all Greek words in the Bible. This word also doesn't appear in the Tuft's Perseus database, which means that it likely comes to us from the Septuagint, where it appears only once. The meaning of the Hebrew word that is translated is "to make yourself pleasing" or, in the passive as used here, "to be made by yourself pleasing."

This verse also the common Greek word for "there" in it, indicating that Jesus's used on the uncommon word for "there" in the previous verse,  Matthew 5:23, was specifically for its double meaning.

NIV : 

Matthew 5:24  leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift.

3rd Translation: 

Matthew 5:24 leave your sacrifice there at the altar. Go and be reconciled to that person. Then come and offer your sacrifice to God.

Wordplay: 

The word in the previous verse that could mean "you make amends" means "there" here. 

My Takeaway: 

Divisions between us demand our making personal contact and letting our minds be changed.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἄφες (2nd sg aor imperat act) "Leave" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

ἐκεῖ (adv) "There" is from ekei, which means "there", "in that place," and in philosophy means "the intelligible world."

τὸ (article sg neut acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). -- untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

δῶρόν (noun sg neut acc) "Gift" is from doron which means "gift", "present," and specifically a "votive gift" or "offering" to a god. The simpler term without the sense of a votive offering is "dorea."

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

προσθεν (adv) "Before" is from emprosthen, which as an adverb means [of place]"in front of", "before", "forwards," [of time] "before", "of old," and as a preposition, "facing", "opposite", "in front," [of time] beforehand," and [of degree] "preferred before." It also denotes a ranking.

τοῦ (article sg neut gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

θυσιαστηρίου, (noun sg neut gen) "The altar" is from thysiastērion , which means "altar."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὕπαγε (verb 2nd sg pres imperat act) "Go thy way" is hypago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you."

πρῶτον (adj sg neut nom/acc) "First" is from protos. In place, this means "the foremost." Of time, it means "the initial." In order, it means "the first." In math, it means the prime numbers. Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." This was the word used to mean "the first" in the parable of the landowner hiring workers.

διαλλάγηθι [unique](2nd sg aor, imper, passive, ) "Be reconciled" is from diallasso, which means "to change", "to change someone's mind," and "to renew a friendship." It is from dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." And from the verb allasso, which means "change." "alter", "give in exchange", "barter", "repay," or "requite". From the Hebrew word ratsah,  using the Hithpael stem, with is used like the middle voice in Greek to show action on oneself ("to make yourself pleasing." Though ratsah, appears dozens of times in the OT, this is the only time it seems to appears in the Hithpael form.

τῷ (article sg masc dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

ἀδελφῷ (noun sg masc dat) "Brother" is from adelphos, which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother."

σου, (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τότε (adv) "Then" is from tote, which means "at that time" and "then."

ἐλθὼν (part sg aor act masc nom) "Come" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. It is almost always translated as "come" in the Gospels, but the sense here seems to be

πρόσφερε (2nd sg pres imperat act) "Offer" is from prosphero, which means "to bring to, " "to bring upon", "to apply to," [without dat] "to apply, use, or use", "to add to", "to present", "to offer", "to address [proposals]", "to convey [property]", "to contribute", "to pay", "to be carried towards [passive]", "to attack", "to assault", "to go toward", "to deal with", "to take [food or drink]," to exhibit", "declare," and "to lead to."

τὸ (article sg neut nom/acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). -- untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

δῶρόν (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Gift" is from doron which means "gift", "present," and specifically a "votive gift" or "offering" to a god. The simpler term without the sense of a votive offering is "dorea."

KJV Analysis: 

Leave -- The word translated as "leave" has a very wide range of meanings.  It means to "let fall," "give up," or even "get rid of." This same word is the same Greek verb often translated as "forgive" in the NT as in "forgiving sins". It is also translated as "leave", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

there -- The Greek word translated as "there" is a the common form of the idea and different from the word translated as there "there" in the previous verse, Matthew 5:23. The difference is that this form doesn't have the same connection to the similar words meaning "cure" and "make amends." In the previous verse, it was in a form that addressed the listener. This doesn't. So the meaning seems more clearly "there" but it creates a play on the previous word.

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gift -- The Greek word translated as "gift" also specifically means "votive offerings" so it is again, a specific word. However, the word is introduced by a definitive article, "the gift" not "a gift." So there is a specific gift being referred to here, so this statement seems to be the answer to a question about a gift. The "your" is also singular.

before -- The Greek word translated as "before" means "in front of" referring to place and when used to apply to time means "beforehand."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

altar, -- "Altar" is a Greek noun that means "altar." It is also an adjective that means "sacrificial." This is not the standard Greek word for "altar" but one that appears first in the Greek OT. It is used only in Judeo/Christian Greek writings.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

go  -- "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

thy way;  -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "thy way;" in the Greek source.

first  -- The word translated as "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially."

 be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

reconciled -- The Greek word translated as "reconciled" is used by Jesus only once. It consists of two other Greek words, a prefix meaning "through", "in the midst of", or "by (a cause)", and a verb meaning "make other than it is", "give in exchange", and "barter".

to  -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

brother -- The word translated as "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

then -- The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then". 

come - (WF) The word translated as "come" is a verb, but in the form of a participle, an adjective ("coming"). The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. 

and -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "and" here in the Greek source. It was added because the previous word was in the wrong form.

offer -- The Greek word translated as "offer" means "to offer" and "to present." It was translated in the previous verse as "bring". The word is specifically used to describe offering sacrifices. The "you" here is singular. It is a command.

thy  -- (WW) The word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gift -- The Greek word translated as "gift" also specifically means "votive offerings" so it is again, a specific word. However, the word is introduced by a definitive article, "the gift" not "a gift." So there is a specific gift being referred to here, so this statement seems to be the answer to a question about a gift. The "your" is also singular.

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "gift" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "thy way" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "brother" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an active verb but a participle, "coming."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "and" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "thy" should be "the" or "that."

NIV Analysis: 

leave -- The word translated as "leave" has a very wide range of meanings.  It means to "let fall," "give up," or even "get rid of." This same word is the same Greek verb often translated as "forgive" in the NT as in "forgiving sins". It is also translated as "leave", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

your -- The word translated as "your " is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gift -- The Greek word translated as "gift" also specifically means "votive offerings" so it is again, a specific word. However, the word is introduced by a definitive article, "the gift" not "a gift." So there is a specific gift being referred to here, so this statement seems to be the answer to a question about a gift. The "your" is also singular.

there -- The Greek word translated as "there" is a the common form of the idea and different from the word translated as there "there" in the previous verse, Matthew 5:23. The difference is that this form doesn't have the same connection to the similar words meaning "cure" and "make amends." In the previous verse, it was in a form that addressed the listener. This doesn't. So the meaning seems more clearly "there" but it creates a play on the previous word.

in front of -- The Greek word translated as "before" means "in front of" referring to place and when used to apply to time means "beforehand."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

altar, -- "Altar" is a Greek noun that means "altar." It is also an adjective that means "sacrificial." This is not the standard Greek word for "altar" but one that appears first in the Greek OT. It is used only in Judeo/Christian Greek writings.

First -- (WP) The word translated as "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially." However, in the Greek, it comes before the "be reconciled" not before the "go."

go  -- "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

reconciled -- The Greek word translated as "reconciled" is used by Jesus only once. It consists of two other Greek words, a prefix meaning "through", "in the midst of", or "by (a cause)", and a verb meaning "make other than it is", "give in exchange", and "barter". It has the sense of changing a relationship by making a trade. It is a Greek word that first appears in the NT. This word doesn't appear in the Tuft's Perseus database that is our prime source for information on the use of words in ancient Greek. The above definitions below comes from the Biblical lexicons only, which come from Biblical translations and so are self-referencing. In these situations, it makes sense to go back to its Greek root and the way this word in used in context but this is the only time this word is used in the NT.

to  -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the "that brother of yours" that was cut. That formt requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

them -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "it" in the Greek source.

untranslated "that"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "brother"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

untranslated "of yours"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "yours" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

then -- The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then". 

come - (WF) The word translated as "come" is a verb, but in the form of a participle, an adjective ("coming"). The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. 

and -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "and" here in the Greek source. It was added because the previous word was in the wrong form.

offer -- The Greek word translated as "offer" means "to offer" and "to present." It was translated in the previous verse as "bring". The word is specifically used to describe offering sacrifices. The "you" here is singular. It is a command.

your -- (WW) The word is the Greek definite article, "your." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gift -- The Greek word translated as "gift" also specifically means "votive offerings" so it is again, a specific word. However, the word is introduced by a definitive article, "the gift" not "a gift." So there is a specific gift being referred to here, so this statement seems to be the answer to a question about a gift. The "your" is also singular.

NIV Translation Issues: 

9
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "gift" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "first" doesn't appear before "go" but before "be reconciled."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "them" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "brother" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "brother" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of yours" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an active verb but a participle, "coming."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "and" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "your" should be "the" or "that."

3rd Analysis: 

leave -- The word translated as "leave" has a very wide range of meanings.  It means to "let fall," "give up," or even "get rid of." This same word is the same Greek verb often translated as "forgive" in the NT as in "forgiving sins". It is also translated as "leave", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

your -- The word translated as "your " is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

sacrifice -- The Greek word translated as "sacrifice" also specifically means "votive offerings" so it is again, a specific word. However, the word is introduced by a definitive article, "the gift" not "a gift." So there is a specific gift being referred to here, so this statement seems to be the answer to a question about a gift. The "your" is also singular.

there -- The Greek word translated as "there" is a the common form of the idea and different from the word translated as there "there" in the previous verse, Matthew 5:23. The difference is that this form doesn't have the same connection to the similar words meaning "cure" and "make amends." In the previous verse, it was in a form that addressed the listener. This doesn't. So the meaning seems more clearly "there" but it creates a play on the previous word.

at -- The Greek word translated as "before" means "in front of" referring to place and when used to apply to time means "beforehand."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

altar, -- "Altar" is a Greek noun that means "altar." It is also an adjective that means "sacrificial." This is not the standard Greek word for "altar" but one that appears first in the Greek OT. It is used only in Judeo/Christian Greek writings.

untranslated "first"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially." However, in the Greek, it comes before the "be reconciled" not before the "go."

Go  -- "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

reconciled -- The Greek word translated as "reconciled" is used by Jesus only once. It consists of two other Greek words, a prefix meaning "through", "in the midst of", or "by (a cause)", and a verb meaning "make other than it is", "give in exchange", and "barter". It has the sense of changing a relationship by making a trade. It is a Greek word that first appears in the NT. This word doesn't appear in the Tuft's Perseus database that is our prime source for information on the use of words in ancient Greek. The above definitions below comes from the Biblical lexicons only, which come from Biblical translations and so are self-referencing. In these situations, it makes sense to go back to its Greek root and the way this word in used in context but this is the only time this word is used in the NT.

to  -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the "that brother of yours" that was cut. That formt requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

that -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

person -- (WW) The word translated as "person" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate. It is not the word, "man," which can be translated as "person."

untranslated "of yours"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "yours" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

Then -- The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then".

come - (WF) The word translated as "come" is a verb, but in the form of a participle, an adjective ("coming"). The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. 

and -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "and" here in the Greek source. It was added because the previous word was in the wrong form.

offer -- The Greek word translated as "offer" means "to offer" and "to present." It was translated in the previous verse as "bring". The word is specifically used to describe offering sacrifices. The "you" here is singular. It is a command.

your -- (WW) The word is the Greek definite article, "your." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

sacrifice -- The Greek word translated as "sacrifice " also specifically means "votive offerings" so it is again, a specific word. However, the word is introduced by a definitive article, "the gift" not "a gift." So there is a specific gift being referred to here, so this statement seems to be the answer to a question about a gift. The "your" is also singular.

to God. -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "to God" here in the Greek source.

3rd Issue Count: 

9
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "gift" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "first" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "person" means "brother."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of yours" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "come" is not an active verb but a participle, "coming."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "and" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "your" should be "the" or "that."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "to God" doesn't exist in the source.

The Spoken Version: 

“Can offering gifts at the temple make up for my offenses against my brother?” the mousy man asked, returning to his earlier topic.
The Master chuckled and gestured for the little man to join him on the speaker’s mound.
“When, in fact, you present that gift of yours on that altar, are you healing yourself?” the Teacher said, restating the man’s question.
“It doesn’t feel like it,” the little man admitted as he walked up. “The rift with my brother remains.”
“You might be remembering,” the Teacher suggested warmly, as he put an arm around him, “that this brother of yours has something against you.”
“A gift at the altar,” the little man recognized solemnly, “changes nothing between us.”  
“Drop it off there, that gift of yours,” the Teacher continued, pretending to put something down on the ground, “in front of the altar and depart!”
“But how do I heal our family’s rift?” the man asked. “It pains my heart.”
The man clutched his chest dramatically.
“First, have your mind changed by that brother of yours,” the Teacher explained.  Then he turned to us and pointed at his head.
“Change your minds,” we chanted on cue.  
“And then to restart our relationship?” the little man asked hopefully.
“And then starting,” the Master explained, gently pulling the man’s hands from his chest and indicating his heart, “offer that gift!”
We smiled and applauded as the Nazarene embraced the man, sending him back into the crowd.

evidence: 

24.00

Front Page Date: 

Apr 30 2020