Matthew 5:39 ...Do not resist evil:

Spoken to: 

audience then an individual

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, debts and repayment

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I myself, however, say to you all, not to compare the worthless. You will be repaid. Anyone who strikes you in that right jaw of yours, turn to him also this other one.

My Takeaway: 

Letting visible debts go creating hidden repayment.

KJV : 

Matthew 5:39 But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also.

NIV : 

Matthew 5:39  But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also.

3rd Translation: 

Matthew 5:39 But I say, do not resist an evil person! If someone slaps you on the right cheek, offer the other cheek also.

What is Lost in Translation: 

The phrase translated as "resist not evil/the evil one" sets the context for the next three verses. All are a comparison with a different type of "evil one." The verb can mean "to stand against" and "to set against," but the word also means "to match with" and "to compare."   It is unlike to mean "resist" because the word requires and object but there is no object here. The "evil/evil one" is in the form that requires a preposition in English, here, it would be "with" as in "compare with." As we will see in subsequent verses, the idea is clearly not "evil" but "worthless." This is of comparison much more sense in the context of the previous verse, Matthew 5:38, which was a comparison of forms of equity.

The word translated as "smite" or "slap" is much more extreme, humorously so. Its primary meaning is "to hit with a club." The phrase is more like "club you in the jaw." This is the only time Jesus uses this word.

Wordplay: 

A play on "right" meaning "good" and "the other" meaning "bad." In this verse, Christ also reuses a lot of words he has used in recent verses for humorous effect. 

The word translated as "turn" is also a metaphor for pain.  

The "sock in the jaw" is connected with the loss of a tooth" ni the previous verse. 

Related Verses: 

Matthew 5:38 ...An eye for an eye,

Matthew 5:37 But let your word be, Yes, yes;

Matthew 5:37 But let your word be, Yes, yes;

Matthew 5:29 And if your right eye offend you,

Matthew 5:30 And if your right hand offend you,

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἐγὼ (pron sg 1st nom) "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I." It also means "I at least," "for my part," "indeed," and for myself.

δὲ (adv) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "Say" is from llego means "pick up," "choose for oneself," "pick out," and "count," "recount," "tell over," "say," "speak," "teach," "mean," "boast of," "tell of," "recite," "nominate," and "command."

ὑμῖν (pron pl 2nd dat) "You" is from humas and humon, which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἀντιστῆναι (aor inf act) "Ye resist" is antihestimi, which "to set against," "to match with," "to compare," "to stand against," "to withstand," "to turn out unfavorably," and "to make a stand."

τῷ (article sg masc dat) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πονηρῷ: (adj sg masc dat) "Evil" is from poneros, which we discuss extensively in this page. In a moral sense, it means "worthless," "base," and "cowardly."

ἀλλ᾽ (conj) "But" is assumed to be alla, which means "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.
OR ( verb 2nd sg fut ind mp) "But" is from  the verb allasso, which means "change." "alter," "give in exchange," "barter," "repay," or "requite."
OR (adj sg neut nom) "But" is from allos, which means "another," "one besides," "of another sort," "different," "other than what is true," "as well," "besides," {with numerals: "yet," "still," "further"), "of other sort," "other than what is," "untrue," "unreal," "other than right," "wrong," "bad," "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest," "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

ὅστις (pron sg masc nom ) "Whoseoever" is from hostis, which means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

σε (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from su which means "you" and "your."

ῥαπίζει [unique](3rd sg pres ind act) "Smite" is rhapizō, which means "hit with a stick," "cudgel," "thrash," "to slap a face," generally, "to strike" or "to beat."

εἰς (prep) "On" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

δεξιὰν (adj sg fem acc) "Right" is from dexios, which means, as an adjective, "on the right hand," "fortunate," "skillful," "ready," "clever," "courteous," and "kindly." As a noun, it means the "right hand," "assurance," "pledge," "treaty,"

σιαγόνα [2 verses](noun sg fem acc ) "Cheek" is siagōn, which means "jaw," "jaw-bone," and "cheek."

[σου], "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

στρέψον [3 verses](2nd sg aor imperat act)"Turn" is from strepho, which means "turn aside," "turn about," "turn over," "rotate," "sprain," "dislocate," "twist," "torture," "return," "plait," "to twist about," "turn and change," "to always be engaged in," "to turn about with oneself," "to wheel about," "give back," and "convert." It is a metaphor for pain.

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "To him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ (coni) "Also" is from kai, is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

τὴν (article sg fem acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἄλλην (adj sg fem acc) "The other" is from allos, which means "another," "one besides," "of another sort," "different," "other than what is true," "as well," "besides," {with numerals: "yet," "still," "further"), "of other sort," "other than what is," "untrue," "unreal," "other than right," "wrong," "bad," "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest," "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

KJV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

I -- (MW) The verse starts with the Greek pronoun "I." Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I, myself."

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching. This Greek word rhymes with the Greek word used above meaning "I."

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

you,  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc.

That  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source.

ye-- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source. The following "verb" is in an infinitive.

resist -- (WF, CW) The Greek translated as "resist" means "to set against," "to match with," "to compare," "to stand against," "to withstand," "to turn out unfavorably," and "to make a stand." Its prefix was the preposition translated as "for" in the previous verse as in "an eye for an eye." The literal meaning is "to stand opposite." The context is compensation for debts. It is an infinitive, not an active verb, certainly not a command.

not -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. Because the negative precedes an infinitive, it negates just that word, not the whole clause.

untranslated "with"-- (MW) The dative case of the following word requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use:  a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on," can all be used depending on the context.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

evil: -- The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." It doesn't have the sense of malevolence that our word "evil" does. This article explores its meaning in more detail. This is an adjective, not a noun.

but -- (MM) The word translated simply as "but" has many possible meanings because its form could be several different Greek words. This is not the common Greek word translated as "but" that separates sentences, but the less common Greek word that usually separates words, phrases, and clauses that are in opposition. That is not its use here. It could be two other Greek words. One is a verb that means "change." "alter," "repay," or "give in exchange" that Jesus uses earlier in Matthew 5:24 to address settling disputes. Its form would mean "you will be repaid."  This obviously fits with the previous phrase. It could also be another Greek word meaning "another," in the form of "another thing," which fits with the end of this sentence.

whosoever -- "Whosoever" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

shall -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "shall" in the Greek source. The following verb is not the future tense nor in a form that requires a "might" or "should."

smite -- The Greek word translated as "smite" primary meaning is much more violent. It means "to beat with a stick," "to cudgel," and "to thrash." When referring to striking a "cheek," or more accurately, a "jaw," "sock" would be the word we typically use in English. The KJV is closer to the sense of this word than other versions which translate it as the milder "slap."

thee -- The "thee" here is singular, meaning that the line was likely addressed to an individual instead of all his listeners. 

on -- The Greek word translated as "on" has a lot of meanings, but "on" isn't usually one of them. Its primary meaning is "into" or "in."

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

right -- The word translated a "right" means "on the right side" but it also has a lot of other meanings, though not the same one as the English word "right." One of those meanings is "courteous," which is the only one that seems to fit with a jaw. However, it could also mean "lucky," which was the sense that Christ seems to have used in another pair of recent verses, Matthew 5:29 and Matthew 5:30.

cheek, -- The Greek word translated as "cheek" means "jaw" or "jawbone." Here is one of the few places it has been translated as "cheek." Given the real meaning of the verb translated as "slaps" as "to beat," the "jaw" seems more appropriate.

turn -- The Greek word translated as "turn" is actually an extreme word than a simple "turn."  The English word that seems the closest is feeling is "twist." It has the same sense of "turn" and "injure by turning. Of course, some of his use of extreme words, like his using extreme statements, is for their entertainment value and their humor. However, it also has the sense of "to convert" as well.

to -- (CW) This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use. The "to" of an indirect object is the most common, but it does not means the "toward" of motion. The most likely meaning here is "for"

him  -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person singular pronouns in English.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

other -- The Greek word translated as "the other" has a lot of different meanings in Greek that are not part of the English word. In a sense, it means "the reverse" because it means "different," "unreal," and even "bad."

also. -- The Greek word translated as "also" is the conjunction usually translated as "and," but it is also used to mean "also" as it is here. It appears before the word "other."

KJV Translation Issues: 

12
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "you" doesn't exist in the source. The following verb is not in a second-person form.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "resist" is not an active verb but an infinitive, "to resist" or "to match."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "resist" does not make perfect sense with the object, which was translated as "the evil one" in the Matthew 5:37.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "shall" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "cheek" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "with" is not shown in the English translation, but some preposition is required because the form of the following word is not a direct object.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" or "the one" before "evil" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MM -- Many Meanings -- This word translated as "but" has several different meanings that work here and is a form of wordplay. The most important one is a verb that means, "You will be repaid."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "shall" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "to" does not mean "toward."

NIV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

I -- (MW) The verse starts with the Greek pronoun "I." Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I, myself."

tell -- The word translated as "tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching. This Greek word rhymes with the Greek word used above meaning "I."

you,  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc.

do -- (WF) This helping verb is used to create commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

not -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. Because the negative precedes an infinitive, it negates just that word, not the whole clause.

resist -- (CW) The Greek translated as "resist" means "to set against," "to match with," "to compare," "to stand against," "to withstand," "to turn out unfavorably," and "to make a stand." Its prefix was the preposition translated as "for" in the previous verse as in "an eye for an eye." The literal meaning is "to stand opposite." The context is compensation for debts. It is an infinitive, not an active verb, certainly not a command.

untranslated "with"-- (MW) The dative case of the following word requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use:  a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on," can all be used depending on the context.

an -- (WW) The word translated as "an" is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

evil: -- The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." It doesn't have the sense of malevolence that our word "evil" does. This article explores its meaning in more detail. This is an adjective.

person -- This is from the singular masculine form of the adjective and article.

 If  -- (WW) The word translated simply as "if" has many possible meanings but none of them are "if." Iits form could be several different Greek words. The most likely is a verb that means "change." "alter," "repay," or "give in exchange" that Jesus uses earlier in Matthew 5:24 to address settling disputes. Its form would mean "you will be repaid."  This obviously fits with the previous phrase. It could also be a conjunction, "but" not the word that usually separates sentences, but the less common Greek word that usually separates words, phrases, and clauses that are in opposition. That does not seem to be not its use here. It could also be another Greek word meaning "another," in the form of "another thing," which fits with the end of this sentence.

anyone -- "Anyone" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

slaps -- The Greek word translated as "slaps " primary meaning is much more violent. It means "to beat with a stick," "to cudgel," and "to thrash." When referring to striking a "cheek," or more accurately, a "jaw," "sock" would be the word we typically use in English. The KJV is closer to the sense of this word than other versions which translate it as the milder "slap."

you -- The "you " here is singular, meaning that the line was likely addressed to an individual instead of all his listeners.

on -- The Greek word translated as "on" has a lot of meanings, but "on" isn't usually one of them. Its primary meaning is "into" or "in."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

right -- The word translated a "right" means "on the right side" but it also has a lot of other meanings, though not the same one as the English word "right." One of those meanings is "courteous," which is the only one that seems to fit with a jaw. However, it could also mean "lucky," which was the sense that Christ seems to have used in another pair of recent verses, Matthew 5:29 and Matthew 5:30.

cheek, -- The Greek word translated as "cheek" means "jaw" or "jawbone." Here is one of the few places it has been translated as "cheek." Given the real meaning of the verb translated as "slaps" as "to beat," the "jaw" seems more appropriate.

untranslated "of yours"-- (MW) The untranslated word "your" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

turn -- The Greek word translated as "turn" is actually a more extreme word than "turn."    The English word that seems the closest is feeling is "twist." It has the same sense of "turn" and "injure by turning. Of course, some of his use of extreme words, like his using extreme statements, is for their entertainment value and their humor. However, it also has the sense of "to convert" as well.

to -- (CW) This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use. The "to" of an indirect object is the most common, but it does not means the "toward" of motion. The most likely meaning here is "for"

them -- (WN) The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person, plural pronouns in English.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

other -- The Greek word translated as "the other" has a lot of different meanings in Greek that are not part of the English word. In a sense, it means "the reverse" because it means "different," "unreal," and even "bad."

also. -- The Greek word translated as "also" is the conjunction usually translated as "and," but it is also used to mean "also" as it is here. It appears before the word "other."

NIV Translation Issues: 

10
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "do" does not indicate an active verb or a command. It is an infinitive, "to resist" or "to match."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "resist" does not make perfect sense with the object, which was translated as "the evil one" in the Matthew 5:37
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "with" is not shown in the English translation, but some preposition is required because the form of the following word is not a direct object.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "an" should be something more like "the one."
  • WW -- Wrong Word  -- This word translated as "if" does not mean "if," but it has several different meanings that work here and is a form of wordplay. The most important ones are the conjunction "but" and a verb that means, "You will be repaid."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "cheek" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "to" does not mean "toward."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "them" is translated as plural but it is singular.

3rd Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

I -- (MW) The verse starts with the Greek pronoun "I." Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I, myself."

say -- The word translated as "tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching. This Greek word rhymes with the Greek word used above meaning "I."

untranslated "you"-- (MW) The untranslated word "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc.

do -- (WF) This helping verb is used to create commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

not -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. Because the negative precedes an infinitive, it negates just that word, not the whole clause.

resist -- ( CW) The Greek translated as "resist" means "to set against," "to match with," "to compare," "to stand against," "to withstand," "to turn out unfavorably," and "to make a stand." Its prefix was the preposition translated as "for" in the previous verse as in "an eye for an eye." The literal meaning is "to stand opposite." The context is compensation for debts. It is an infinitive, not an active verb, certainly not a command.

untranslated "with"-- (MW) The dative case of the following word requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use:  a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on," can all be used depending on the context.

 an -- (WW) The word translated as "an" is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.

evil: -- The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." It doesn't have the sense of malevolence that our word "evil" does. This article explores its meaning in more detail. This is an adjective.

person -- This is from the singular masculine form of the adjective and article.

 If  -- (WW) The word translated simply as "but" has many possible meanings because its form could be several different Greek words. This is not the common Greek word translated as "but" that separates sentences, but the less common Greek word that usually separates words, phrases, and clauses that are in opposition. That is not its use here. It could be two other Greek words. One is a verb that means "change." "alter," or "give in exchange" that Jesus uses earlier in Matthew 5:24 to address settling disputes. Its form would mean "you will be changed."  This obviously fits with the previous phrase. It could also be another Greek word meaning "another," in the form of "another thing," which fits with the end of this sentence.

someone -- "Someone " is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

slaps -- The Greek word translated as "slaps " primary meaning is much more violent. It means "to beat with a stick," "to cudgel," and "to thrash." When referring to striking a "cheek," or more accurately, a "jaw," "sock" would be the word we typically use in English. The KJV is closer to the sense of this word than other versions which translate it as the milder "slap."

you -- The "you " here is singular, meaning that the line was likely addressed to an individual instead of all his listeners.

on -- The Greek word translated as "on" has a lot of meanings, but "on" isn't usually one of them. Its primary meaning is "into" or "in."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

right -- The word translated a "right" means "on the right side" but it also has a lot of other meanings, though not the same one as the English word "right." One of those meanings is "courteous," which is the only one that seems to fit with a jaw. However, it could also mean "lucky," which was the sense that Christ seems to have used in another pair of recent verses, Matthew 5:29 and Matthew 5:30.

cheek, -- The Greek word translated as "cheek" means "jaw" or "jawbone." Here is one of the few places it has been translated as "cheek." Given the real meaning of the verb translated as "slaps" as "to beat," the "jaw" seems more appropriate.

untranslated "of yours"-- (MW) The untranslated word "your" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

offer -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "offer" is actually a more extreme word than "turn."  The English word that seems the closest is feeling is "twist." It has the same sense of "turn" and "injure by turning. Of course, some of his use of extreme words, like his using extreme statements, is for their entertainment value and their humor. However, it also has the sense of "to convert" as well.

untranslated "for"-- (MW) The untranslated word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use. The "to" of an indirect object is the most common, but it does not means the "toward" of motion. The most likely meaning here is "for"

untranslated "him"-- (MW) The untranslated word "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person singular pronouns in English.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

other -- The Greek word translated as "the other" has a lot of different meanings in Greek that are not part of the English word. In a sense, it means "the reverse" because it means "different," "unreal," and even "bad."

cheek, -- -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "cheek" in the Greek source.

also. -- The Greek word translated as "also" is the conjunction usually translated as "and," but it is also used to mean "also" as it is here. It appears before the word "other."

3rd Issue Count: 

13
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "to you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "do" does not indicate an active verb or a command. It is an infinitive, "to resist" or "to match."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "resist" does not make perfect sense with the object, which was translated as "the evil one" in the Matthew 5:37
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "with" is not shown in the English translation, but some preposition is required because the form of the following word is not a direct object.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "an" should be something more like "the one."
  • WW -- Wrong Word  -- This word translated as "if" does not mean "if," but it has several different meanings that work here and is a form of wordplay. The most important ones are the conjunction "but" and a verb that means, " You are going to change yourself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "cheek" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of yours" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "offer" should be something more like "twist."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "for" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "him" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "cheek" doesn't exist in the source.

evidence: 

38.00

Front Page Date: 

May 15 2020