Matthew 7:4 Or how do your say to you brother, L

Spoken to: 

an individual

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, temporary and permanent, criticism and acceptance

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Truly! How will you say to the brother of yours, "Let go. I am going take the speck from the eye of yours." Just look! That beam in the eye of yours.

My Takeaway: 

Our faults prevent us from seeing and fixing the faults of others.

KJV : 

Matthew 7:4 Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye?

NIV : 

Matthew 7:4  How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when all the time there is a plank in your own eye?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

As Matthew 7:3, understanding this verse is easier if we understand that "light" and "sight" are the metaphors that Jesus uses for knowledge and understanding (see this article). Here, however, the tone is clearly humorous and Jesus uses a form of a word, meaning "toss," that he usually uses humorously.

The image is one of trying to get a friend to relax when you don't know what you are doing. Notice how the "beam/plank" blocking one sight can be understood as a structural beam blocking one's view. The same word also means the bar that blocks a door.

Wordplay: 

 The word for "see" also means "to understand" and "know." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." OR (exclam) "Or" is e which is an exclamation meaning "hi!" OR (adv) "Or" is e, which is an adverb meaning "in truth" and "of a surety".

πῶς (pron indeclform) "How" is from pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any mean", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose."

ἐρεῖς [7 verses](verb 2nd sg fut ind act) "Wilt thou say" is ero, which means "to speak", "to say", "to pronounce", "to tell", "to let suffice", "to announce", "to proclaim," (in passive) "to be pronounced", "to be mentioned", "to be specified", "to be agreed," and "to be promised."

τῷ (article sg masc dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἀδελφῷ (noun sg masc dat) "Brother" is from adelphos (adelphos),which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother."

σου (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

Ἄφες (2nd sg aor imperat act) "Let" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." -

κβάλω (1st sg fut ind act) "Me pull out" is from ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter."

τὸ -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

κάρφος (noun sg neut acc) "Mote" is from karphos, which means "any small dry body", "dry stalk", "dry twigs", "chips," "chaff," "straws", "bits of wool", "toothpick", "a small piece of wood on which the watchword was written," and "ripe fruit[plural],."

ἐκ (prep) "From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ὀφθαλμοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Eye" is ophthalmos, which means "eye", "sight", "the dearest and best", "light", "cheer", "comfort," and "the bud [of a plant]."

σου, (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thine" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

καὶ (adj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἰδοὺ (2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold" is from oida which is a form of eido which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

-- (WW) The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

δοκὸς (noun sg fem nom ) "Beam" is from dokos, which means "bearing-beam", "main beam", "plank", "support", "beam", "strut", "brace", "firewood", "bar [of a gate or door]," and "a kind of meteor."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τῷ (article sg masc dat))  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ὀφθαλμῷ (noun sg masc dat) "Eye" is from ophthalmos, which means "eye", "sight", "the dearest and best", "light", "cheer", "comfort," and "the bud [of a plant]."

σοῦ; (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

KJV Analysis: 

Or  -  "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

how  - The Greek word translated as "how" usually does mean "how," but here it doesn't seem to be part of a question. It also means "I suppose" and "in this manner."

wilt -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

thou -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

say  - The word translated as "say" is an unusual form of the Greek word that means "to say" and "to speak" also. The form is a special one of the future tense. Jesus only uses this word a few times.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

thy -- The word translated as "thy" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

brother  -  The word translated as "brother" also means anyone close to you much as it is used in modern English. We would often say "friend" in the same way.

Let -- (CW) The word translated as "let" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. This is in the form of a command or request. The word is confusing because it is usually used to translate a special Greek form called a third-person command, that is not the form here.

me -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "me" in the Greek source.

pull out  - "Pull out" is from verb that is normally translated in the NT as "cast out" or "throw out." It has a humorous feel, like "toss" in English.  It is not an infinitive, but a statement in the future tense of the first person, so "I am going to toss out." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

mote The Greek term translated as "the mote" means something small like "twig", "straw," or "chaff." These terms, especially "chaff" have the sense of "trash", "rubbish," and "remains."

out  - The Greek preposition translated as "out" means "out of" of "from."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

thine  -- The word translated as "thine  " is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

eye;  -- The Greek word for "eye" is the more technical terms for "eye" but it also means "sight". In Greek, an eye is a metaphor for comfort and cheer.

and, -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." The word "just" seems to work with the command form of the verb.

behold,  - The Greek verb translated as "behold" means "to see" and it is used to mean "know" and "perceive". It is in the imperative, which makes it a command. In this case, "recognize" captures the sense of seeing and knowing in a command.

a -- (WW) The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

beam  - The term translated as "beam" means the main bearing beam in a house that holds up the roof or floor but also covers any stick of wood. It is perhaps meaningful that it is the term for the bar on a door.

is -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within", "with," or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.

thine -- The word translated as "thine " is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

own -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "own" in the Greek source.

eye?   -- The Greek word for "eye" is the more technical terms for "eye" but it also means "sight". In Greek, an eye is a metaphor for comfort and cheer.

KJV Translation Issues: 

8
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "brother" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "let" is not a helping verb for another verb in the third-person command form.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "me" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before the first "eye" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be "the."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before the second "eye" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "own" doesn't exist in the source.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "or" or "truly"-- (MW) The untranslated word "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

How - The Greek word translated as "how" usually does mean "how," but here it doesn't seem to be part of a question. It also means "I suppose" and "in this manner."

can -- (WW) This helping verb "can" should indicate that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. A different verb form is required for "can" in Greem.  Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

you -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

say  - The word translated as "say" is an unusual form of the Greek word that means "to say" and "to speak" also. The form is a special one of the future tense. Jesus only uses this word a few times.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

your -- The word translated as "your" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

brother  -  The word translated as "brother" also means anyone close to you much as it is used in modern English. We would often say "friend" in the same way.

Let -- (CW) The word translated as "let" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. This is in the form of a command or request. The word is confusing because it is usually used to translate a special Greek form called a third-person command, that is not the form here.

me -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "me" in the Greek source.

take   - "Pull out" is from verb that is normally translated in the NT as "cast out" or "throw out." It has a humorous feel, like "toss" in English.  It is not an infinitive, but a statement in the future tense of the first person, so "I am going to toss out."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

mote The Greek term translated as "the mote" means something small like "twig", "straw," or "chaff." These terms, especially "chaff" have the sense of "trash", "rubbish," and "remains."

out  - The Greek preposition translated as "out" means "out of" of "from."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

your -- The word translated as "your" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

eye;  -- The Greek word for "eye" is the more technical terms for "eye" but it also means "sight". In Greek, an eye is a metaphor for comfort and cheer.

when , -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "when" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." The word "just" seems to work with the command form of the verb.

all the time there is -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "all the time there is" in the Greek source.

untranslated "behold"-- (MW) The untranslated word "behold" means "to see" and it is used to mean "know" and "perceive". It is in the imperative, which makes it a command. In this case, "recognize" captures the sense of seeing and knowing in a command.

a -- (WW) The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more.

plank - The term translated as "beam" means the main bearing beam in a house that holds up the roof or floor but also covers any stick of wood. It is perhaps meaningful that it is the term for the bar on a door.

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "within", "with," or "among"  with a dative object as the one here.

your -- The word translated as "your " is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

own -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "own" in the Greek source.

eye?   -- The Greek word for "eye" is the more technical terms for "eye" but it also means "sight". In Greek, an eye is a metaphor for comfort and cheer.

NIV Translation Issues: 

9
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "brother" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "let" is not a helping verb for another verb in the third-person command form.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "me" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before first "eye" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "when" should be "and."
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "all the time there is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be "the."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before second "eye" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "own" doesn't exist in the source.

evidence: 

85.00

Front Page Date: 

Jun 30 2020