Matthew 7:7 Ask, and it shall be given to you;

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, trust and doubt,  requesting and getting

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Ask, and it will given to you; search and you will discover; examine, and it is going to be disclosed to you:

My Takeaway: 

To learn, we must first act.

KJV : 

Matthew 7:7 Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you:

NIV : 

Matthew 7:7  Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is a simple verse with a lot of hidden meanings.

This verse primarily consists of six verbs. Three of them are in the form of commands. The other three verbs are in the form of future predictions, perhaps promises. The first three of these word, "ask," "give," and "seek," have been used several times before in the Sermon, but next three are used by Jesus for the first time here, "find," "knock," and "open." The last two are uncommon for Jesus.

The two words translated as "ask," and "seek," have secondary meanings of "desire" or "crave." Since they are both commands, there is a strong sense that we are must desire a specific goal in order to take the actions to get them.

Wordplay: 

 All the key verbs in this verse have double meanings that relate to experimentation, testing, and discovery. Two of them also have double meanings relating to craving and desiring. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Αἰτεῖτε, (2nd pl pres imperat) "Ask" is from aiteo, which means "to ask," "to demand," "to beg," "to claim," and "to ask for one's own use."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

δοθήσεται (3rd sg fut ind pass) "It shall be given" is from didomi, which means "to give," "to grant," "to hand over," "appoint," "establish," and "to describe."

ὑμῖν: (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is from humin, which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given.

ζητεῖτε, (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Seek" is from zeteo, which means "inquire for," "search for," "seek after," "desire," and "feel the want of."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

εὑρήσετε ( 2nd pl fut ind act) "Ye shall find" is from heurisko, which means "to find," "to find out," "to discover," "to devise," "to invent," "to get," and "to gain."

κρούετε, [6 verses](2nd pl pres imperat) "Knock" is from krouo, which means to "strike," "smite," "strike one against another," "strike together," "knocking," "examine," "try," "prove," and "knock at the door [on the outside]."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἀνοιγήσεται [9 verses](3rd sg fut ind pass) "It shall be opened" is from anoigo, which means "to open," "to throw open," and "to disclose."

ὑμῖν. (pron 2nd pl dat ) "You" is from humin, which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given.

KJV Analysis: 

Ask,  - The word translated as "ask" primarily means "ask" but it also has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim." It is in the form of a command addressed to all his listeners.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

given  - The term for "given," is one of the most common terms that Jesus uses. It means to "give" or "grant." He often uses it to refer to an ability or, more specifically, knowledge. This word was last used in the previous verse, Matthew 7:6, about giving the sacred to dogs.  Jesus also uses this word to describe those fulfilling other people's desires. It is in the future tense. -

you;  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

seek, -- The Greek verb translated as "sought" has a variety of meanings around the idea of "searching" and "desiring." It has a sense of seeking with a specific aim. Jesus last used this word in Matthew 6:33 to refer seeking the realm of the Divine.  Again, this is in the form of a command addressed to all of his listeners.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

find;  - The term used for "find" means "to find," "to discover," "to devise," "to invent," and similar ideas. This is Jesus's first use of this word.  It is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It also specifically means finding by intellectual inquiry, as in analyzing and understanding something. It is the source word for our idea of heuristic methods, that is, testing our ideas. The ancient view of science was based on intellectual analysis rather than testing.

knock,  - The word translated as "knock" also means "to examine" and "to prove." Even more interesting, the word used for "knock," is a metaphor for "examining," "trying," or "proving" something. This idea comes from tapping an earthen vessel to see if it "rings true." The use of this word is especially telling because, unlike English, the Greek term describes testing appearances. The idea of physical testing as a form of advancing scientific knowledge is the foundation of our modern scientific method rather than the intellectual methods of the ancients.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

opened  -  The term for "open" means "to disclose" or "to lay open." It means revealing something that is there, but that you cannot access.

unto  - -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object,

you:  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

KJV Translation Issues: 

0

NIV Analysis: 

Ask,  - The word translated as "ask" primarily means "ask" but it also has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim." It is in the form of a command addressed to all his listeners.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

given  - The term for "given," is one of the most common terms that Jesus uses. It means to "give" or "grant." He often uses it to refer to an ability or, more specifically, knowledge. This word was last used in the previous verse, Matthew 7:6, about giving the sacred to dogs.  Jesus also uses this word to describe those fulfilling other people's desires. It is in the future tense. to  - -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object,

you;  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

seek, -- The Greek verb translated as "sought" has a variety of meanings around the idea of "searching" and "desiring." It has a sense of seeking with a specific aim. Jesus last used this word in Matthew 6:33 to refer seeking the realm of the Divine.  Again, this is in the form of a command addressed to all of his listeners.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

find;  - The term used for "find" means "to find," "to discover," "to devise," "to invent," and similar ideas. This is Jesus's first use of this word.  It is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It also specifically means finding by intellectual inquiry, as in analyzing and understanding something. It is the source word for our idea of heuristic methods, that is, testing our ideas. The ancient view of science was based on intellectual analysis rather than testing.

knock,  - The word translated as "knock" also means "to examine" and "to prove." Even more interesting, the word used for "knock," is a metaphor for "examining," "trying," or "proving" something. This idea comes from tapping an earthen vessel to see if it "rings true." The use of this word is especially telling because, unlike English, the Greek term describes testing appearances. The idea of physical testing as a form of advancing scientific knowledge is the foundation of our modern scientific method rather than the intellectual methods of the ancients.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

will -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

opened  -  The term for "open" means "to disclose" or "to lay open." It means revealing something that is there, but that you cannot access.

to   -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object,

you:  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you," "for you," etc. 

NIV Translation Issues: 

0

evidence: 

88.00

Front Page Date: 

Jul 3 2020