Matthew 23:37 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, thou that killest the prophets,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

A long condemnation of the religious leaders of his era or maybe all eras.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the one slaying the prophets, and the one throwing stones at the ones having been sent before her. So many times, I desired to gather up in your children. Which, even as the bird gathers up those chickies of hers under those wings. And you all didn't desire [it].

My Takeaway: 

Bringing people together is difficult when they think they have the power.

KJV : 

Matthew 23:37 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, thou that killest the prophets, and stonest them which are sent unto thee, how often would I have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not!

NIV : 

Matthew 23:37 “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing.

What is Lost in Translation: 

The English translation makes the first part sound like it is in the second person, addressed to Jerusalem, with the "ye" and "you" but nothing in the Greek is in the second person until the last word. This second-person goes back to the Latin Vulgate, indicating that the KJV and NIV are more faithful to the Latin than the original Greek.

There is a small joke here, with the use of opposites, the chick are gather ed"up" (technically "over") but "under" wings. The basic humor is, of course, in the image of the analogy.

This is the first time Jesus uses the term translated as "gather together" (literally, "gather over"). After the later use in this verse, the next time he uses it (Matthew 24:31) to refer specifically to the gathering up of the elect. The term has a sense of someone doing work to bring together something for their own use.

The ending verb is in the second person but it is the plural, but all references to Jerusalem are the third-person feminine, "her." This last verb sounds like the answer to a separate question because it is addressed to a group of people.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "even as" means "this way" seemingly announcing a demonstation,

Christ contrasted what he desires with what Jerusalem desires. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἰερουσαλήμ[15 verses](Aramaic noun) "Jerusalem" is Ierousalēm, which is a form of word that denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms, this form and Hierosolyma, in the NT. This is the first use of this form.

Ἰερουσαλήμ[15 verses](Aramaic noun) "Jerusalem" is Ierousalēm, which is a form of word that denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms, this form and Hierosolyma, in the NT. This is the first use of this form.

[821 verses](article sg fem nom)  "That" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἀποκτείνουσα (part sg pres act fem nom), "killest" is from apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy." It is in the form of a present participle, "destroying" acting as a noun ("those destroying").

τοὺς [821 verses](article pl masc acc)  "The is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

προφήτας (noun pl masc acc) "The prophets" is from prophetes, which means "one who speaks for a god and interprets his will," "interpreter," "keepers of the oracle," "the highest level of priesthood in Egypt," "interpreter," and "herald." It is a verb that means "to shine forth" It is a form of the verb, prophao. which means "to shine forth," or "to shine before."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv)  "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

λιθοβολοῦσα (part sg pres act fem nom) "Stonest" is from lithoboleo, which means "to pelt with stones."

τοὺς  [821 verses](article sg fem nom)  "That" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἀπεσταλμένους (part pl perf mp masc acc) "Was sent" is from apostello, which means "to send off," "to send away," or "to dispatch."

πρὸς [92 verses](prep)  "For" is from pros, which means "on the side of," "in the direction of," "from (place)," "towards" "before," "in the presence of," "in the eyes of," "in the name of," "by reason of," "before (supplication)," "proceeding from (for effects)," "dependent on," "derivable from," "agreeable,""becoming," "like," "at the point of," "in addition to," "against," and "before."

αὐτὴν, [720 verses](adj sg fem acc ) "Thee" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ποσάκις [2 verses] (adv) "How often" is posakis, which means "how many times?." "how often?" and "so many times."

ἠθέλησα [64 verses](verb 1st sg aor ind act") "Would I" is thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)," "to wish," "to ordain," "to decree," "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain," "to hold," "to delight in, and "will (too express a future event)." As an adverb, "willingly," and "gladly." and "to desire." As an adjective, it means "wished for" and "desired."

ἐπισυναγαγεῖν [5 verses] (verb aor inf act) "Gather together" is which means "to collect and bring to a place." It also means to "bring into" a conversation or to "infer" or "conclude."

τὰ [821 verses](article pl neut nom/acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

τέκνα (noun pl neut nom/acc) "Children" is from teknon, which means "that which is born," "child," and "the young."

σου, [144 verses](adj sg masc/neut gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

ὃν [294 verses(pron sg masc/neut acc) Untranslated is hos, which means "this," "that," "he," "she," "which," "what," "who," "whosoever," "where," "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

τρόπον [2 verses](noun sg masc acc) "Even as" is tropos, which means a "turn," "direction," "course," "way," "guise," "how?" "fitting," "suitable," of persons, "a way of life," "habit," "custom," a man's "ways," "habits," "character," "temper," in speaking or writing, "manner," "style," but more generally, "style," and in Music, a particular "mode."

ὄρνις [5 verses] (noun sg masc/fem nom) "A hen" is ornis, which means "bird," including birds of prey and domestic fowls, "bird of omen," a metaphor for "omen" taken from the flight or cries of birds, "cock," "hen," and "fowl."

ἐπισυνάγει [5 verses] (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Gathereth" is from episynago, which means "to collect and bring to a place." It also means to "bring into" a conversation or to "infer" or "conclude."

τὰ [821 verses](article pl neut nom/acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

νοσσία (νεοσσιά) [1 verse] (noun pl neut nom/acc diminutive) "Chickens" is nossion, which means "a young bird," "nestling," "chick," "yolk" of an egg, and, as a metaphor, "chip off the block." A form of "neon" meaning "young" and "youthful."

[αὐτῆς] [720 verses](adj sg fem gen) "Her" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself," "yourself," "himself," "herself," "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him," "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ὑπὸ [29 verses](prep) "Under" is from hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)," "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by," "under," or "with," "under the cover or protection of," "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate," "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection," "control," "dependence," of Time, "in the course of," "during," "about," as an adverb, "under," "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by," "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause).

τὰς [821 verses](article sg fem nom)  "Her" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

πτέρυγας, [2 verses](noun pl fem acc) "Wings" is from pteryx, which means "wings," "winged creature," "bird," "flight," "augury," "omen,"anything like a wing, "flippers" of seals or turtles, "feathery foliage," "blade" of the steering-paddle, "flap" of a cuirass, "broad edge" of a knife or hunting-spear, "shoulder-blade," pl., "sails," anything that covers or protects like wings, and "wings" of a building.

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv)  "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

οὐκ [269 verses](partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

ἠθελήσατε; [64 verses]((verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Ye would" is thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)," "to wish," "to ordain," "to decree," "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain," "to hold," "to delight in, and "will (to express a future event)." As an adverb, "willingly," and "gladly." and "to desire." As an adjective, it means "wished for" and "desired."

KJV Analysis: 

O -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "O" in the Greek source.

Jerusalem, Jerusalem,  - The word "Jerusalem" denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms of this word appear in the NT. This is the only time this form is used in Matthew. It is only used once in Mark, but not in Jesus's words. It isn't used at all in John. This version is used most heavily in Luke, mostly in his narration, but a few times in Christ's words. It seems to be the more formally Greek version of the name.

thou -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "thou" in the Greek source.

that -- The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

killest  - (WF) "Killest" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here. This is a verb used as a noun, "the one slaying."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

prophets,  -- (UW) The Greek word translated as "prophets" means "one who speaks for God," "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt,, but its root words mean "shine light before" and so "shining lights" or "enlightened" seems to capture the idea better. Jesus uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople, but their books in the OT. It is the verb that means "to shine before." Our word "luminaries" captures the idea very well.  It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English. Read this article for more information.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

missing "the one"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

stonest  - (WF)"Stonest" is from a word that means literally "to throw stones." The verb is in the form of a noun, "the one stoning." Like the "slaying" used above, the tense is in the present.

them -- (CW) The word translated as "them" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. It is not the pronoun usually translated as "them."

which -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "which" in the Greek source.

are -- (WT)-- This helping verb indicates that the verb is passive and the present tense of the verb. The actual tense is the past perfect.

sent  - (WF) The "sent" here is from a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle." Here, the verb is in the form a plural, masculine adjective in the past perfect, "the ones having been sent."

unto  - (CW) The word translated as "unto " means "towards," "by reason of (for)," and "against." A "to" or "unto" usually indicates the dative case of the following verb.

thee, (WW)  The word translated as "thee" should be something more like "her." The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The form is feminine.

how often  - The word translated as "how often" means "how many time" or "so many times." It is an uncommon word for Jesus to say this.

would  - (CW) The Greek word translated as "would" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. Its primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. Translating it as "desire" eliminates confusion.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

have -- (WT) This helping verb "have" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb here.

gathered  -  (WF) This is not the common word usually translated as "gathered" but a compound form of it meaning "gather upon" or "collected over," like we would say "gathered up." Its idea is completed below with "together."  This form is an infinitive, "to gather up."

thy - The word translated as "thy" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

children  - The word translated as "children" means "child" but in the more general sense of "offspring." Jesus does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child." Nor is it the word meaning "son" that is also translated as "child,"

together,  - This completes the idea of the verb.

missing "those that"  -- (MW) The untranslated word appears here in Greek, a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause. It matches the form of the following word.

even as  - (CW) "Even as" is from a noun, uncommon for Jesus that means "style," "way," or "custom," plus a lot of other specific meanings. The sense here is "this way." However, it is the form of an object without a verb, so the sense is "[it is] this way." This would announce a demonstration of the following part.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

hen  - (CW) The word translated as "hen" is the general, formal word for "bird," in Greek. It includes birds of prey and domestic fowls. This is not the word Christ normally uses for birds, which literally means "wing ones." This is the only time he uses this word (except for parallel verse in Luke). Nor does it mean a female bird, being in a form that can mean either male or female.

gathereth  - (CW) "Gathereth" is from the word used above the means "collect and bring in." This is the same word as above, but translated without the "together" making it look like the common form of the verb.

her -- The word translated as "her" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun follows the noun so "of hers."

chickens  -  (CW) The Greek word translated as "chickens" doesn't refer to chickens, but to a young bird or chick. It is a diminutive form, so "chickies." The root of the word means "young" so that sense is lost.

under - The word translated as "under" primarily means "by," "under," or "with" (with the genitive and a passive verb). Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion.

her -- (WW) The word translated as "her" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

wings,  - The Greek word translated as "wings" is the common word for "wings," and, like our word, has a lot of related meanings. If is a version of this word that usually gets translated as "birds" in the NT.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

ye  - -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb. Notice the change to plural second-person here. The first section was all singular, third-person, referring to Jerusalem.

would  - - (CW) The Greek word translated as "would" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. Its primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. Translating it as "desire" eliminates confusion.

not! - The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

KJV Translation Issues: 

23
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "O" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "thou" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "killest" is not an active verb but a participle, "slaying."
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "prophets" means "shining light" or "oracle." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "stonest" is not an active verb but a participle, "stoning."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "them" should be something more like "the ones."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "which" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "are" indicates the present tense but the verb is the past perfect tense.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "send" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "unto" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "thee" should be something more like "her."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "would" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" indicates the past perfect tense, but the tense is something that happens at a specific point in time (past, present, or future).
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "gathered" is not an active verb but an infinitive, "to gather."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "children" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "those that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "even as" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "hen" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "gatherest" is not the common word usually translated as "gatherest."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "chickens" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "her" should be something more like "those."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "would" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.

NIV Analysis: 

Jerusalem, Jerusalem,  - The word "Jerusalem" denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms of this word appear in the NT. This is the only time this form is used in Matthew. It is only used once in Mark, but not in Jesus's words. It isn't used at all in John. This version is used most heavily in Luke, mostly in his narration, but a few times in Christ's words. It seems to be the more formally Greek version of the name.

you -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "thou" in the Greek source.

who -- (WW) The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

kill - (WF) "Kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here. This is a verb used as a noun, "the one slaying."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

prophets,  -- (UW) The Greek word translated as "prophets" means "one who speaks for God," "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt,, but its root words mean "shine light before" and so "shining lights" or "enlightened" seems to capture the idea better. Jesus uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople, but their books in the OT. It is the verb that means "to shine before." Our word "luminaries" captures the idea very well.  It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English. Read this article for more information.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

missing "the one"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

stone  - (WF) "Stone" is from a word that means literally "to throw stones." The verb is in the form of a noun, "the one stoning." Like the "slaying" used above, the tense is in the present.

those -- The word translated as "those" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. It is not the pronoun usually translated as "them."

sent  - (WT, WF) The "sent" here is from a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle." Here, the verb is in the form a plural, masculine adjective in the past perfect, "the ones having been sent."

to  - (CW) The word translated as "to " means "towards," "by reason of (for)," and "against." A "to" or "unto" usually indicates the dative case of the following verb.

you , (WW)  The word translated as "thee" should be something more like "her." The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The form is feminine.

how often  - The word translated as "how often" means "how many time" or "so many times." It is an uncommon word for Jesus to say this.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

have -- (WT) This helping verb "have" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb here.

longed - (CW) The Greek word translated as "longed " is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. Its primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. Translating it as "desire" eliminates confusion.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

gather  -  This is not the common word usually translated as "gather" but a compound form of it meaning "gather upon" or "collected over," like we would say "gathered up." Its idea is completed below with "together."

your - The word translated as "your " is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

children  - The word translated as "children" means "child" but in the more general sense of "offspring." Jesus does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child." Nor is it the word meaning "son" that is also translated as "child,"

together,  - This completes the idea of the verb.

missing "those that"  -- (MW) The untranslated word appears here in Greek, a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause. It matches the form of the following word.

as  - (CW) "Even as" is from a noun, uncommon for Jesus that means "style," "way," or "custom," plus a lot of other specific meanings. The sense here is "this way." However, it is the form of an object without a verb, so the sense is "[it is] this way." This would announce a demonstration of the following part.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

hen  - (CW) The word translated as "hen" is the general, formal word for "bird," in Greek. It includes birds of prey and domestic fowls. This is not the word Christ normally uses for birds, which literally means "wing ones." This is the only time he uses this word (except for parallel verse in Luke). Nor does it mean a female bird, being in a form that can mean either male or female.

gathers  - (CW) "Gathers" is from the word used above the means "collect and bring in." This is the same word as above, but translated without the "together" making it look like the common form of the verb.

her -- The word translated as "her" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun follows the noun so "of hers."

chicks  -  The Greek word translated as "chickens" doesn't refer to chickens, but to a young bird or chick. It is a diminutive form, so "chickies." The root of the word means "young" so that sense is lost.

under - The word translated as "under" primarily means "by," "under," or "with" (with the genitive and a passive verb). Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion.

her -- (WW) The word translated as "her" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

wings,  - The Greek word translated as "wings" is the common word for "wings," and, like our word, has a lot of related meanings. If is a version of this word that usually gets translated as "birds" in the NT.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

you - -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb. Notice the change to plural second-person here. The first section was all singular, third-person, referring to Jerusalem.

were -- This indicates the past tense, which is possible but the actual tense is at some point in time, past present or future.

not! - The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

willing- -   The Greek word translated as "willing" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. Its primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. Translating it as "desire" eliminates confusion.

NIV Translation Issues: 

19
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "you" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "who" should be something more like "the one."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "kill" is not an active verb but a participle, "slaying."
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "prophets" means "shining light" or "oracle." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "stone" is not an active verb but a participle, "stoning."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "which" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "sent" indicates the simple past tense but the verb is the past perfect tense.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sent" is not an active verb but a participle, "sending."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "to" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "you" should be something more like "her."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "would" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" indicates the past perfect tense, but the tense is something that happens at a specific point in time (past, present, or future).
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "children" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "those that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "as" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "hen" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "gathers" is not the common word usually translated as "gathers."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "her" should be something more like "those."

Front Page Date: 

Aug 28 2021