Matthew 21:42 Did you never read in the scriptures...

Spoken to: 

group

Context: 

This continues the lesson about authority following a parable about a son being killed.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Don't you ever recognize in the writings: This stone, the one they rejected, those building a house, this one was transformed into a head of a corner issuing from the Lord and it is a marvel in our eyes.
from the Lord
its true self comes into being.
It is wonderful
in our sight.

KJV : 

Matthew 21:42 Did ye never read in the scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner: this is the Lord's doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

A great deal is lost in translation in this verse. It may not have the record for the number of added words, missing words, and confusing words, but it sure works hard for it. I cannot deal with everything hidden here, except in the detailed analysis, but I will highlight a few of the major elements. Of course, the basic idea of the verse, Jesus calling himself misshapen, it funny.

Many translations, including the NIV, confuse "the head of a corner", that is, a "capstone," with a "cornerstone" or a "keystone," which is in most ways its opposite idea. The capstone protects the wall; the cornerstone supports it. Instead of a square, like every other stone, the capstone is slanted to divert water from the top of the wall. The capstones in the corner were slanted in two directions. Jesus is calling himself odd, here, but his oddness serves a purpose.   The "capstone" is a play on words because "head" also means "a leader" and "corner" means a part of the community.

This verse inserts a number of definite articles, the word, "the," which is odd because, usually, the translators drop them, which we see here as well. However, there is a specific theological reason for this mistranslation, the adding of "the's." The translators what the verses to have Jesus characterize himself as more unique than his words did.  "A stone" is less special than "the stone." It is not "the head/cornerstone" but "a capstone." It is not "the corner" but "a corner." It is not that Jesus wasn't unique, we all are, but that in this regard, as a protector of others, Jesus was not unique.

The end of this verse is a direct quote from the Greek version of the Psalms 118:22 and 118:23. This means Jesus's idea was inspired by what was written.

NIV : 

Matthew 21:42  “Have you never read in the Scriptures: “ ‘The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; the Lord has done this, and it is marvelous in our eyes’?

Wordplay: 

The "head of the corner" means both a capstone, protecting a wall and a head of community leaders, which were called "corners" of the community like we call them "pillars" of a community. 

My Takeaway: 

The wrong thing can become the right thing at the right time.

Related Verses: 

Mark 12:10 And have you not read this scripture; The stone which the builders rejected...

Luke 20:17 What is this then that is written, The stone which the builders rejected,

Psalm 118:22  (LXX 117:22) λίθον ὃν ἀπεδοκίμασαν οἱ οἰκοδομοῦντες οὗτος ἐγενήθη εἰς κεφαλὴν γωνίας

Psa 118:23 (LXX 117:23) παρὰ κυρίου ἐγένετο αὕτη καὶ ἔστιν θαυμαστὴ ἐν ὀφθαλμοῗς ἡμῶν

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐδέποτε [5 verses](adv) "Never" is oudepote, which means "and not ever", "nor ever", "not even ever," and "never." It is from two words, oude , which means "but not", "neither", "nor,"and "not even." And pote, which means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

ἀνέγνωτε 9 verses](verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Have ye...read" is anaginosko, which means "to recognize", "to know well", "to know certainly", "to know again", "to own," and "to acknowledge."

ἐν (prep)"In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ταῖς  (article pl fem dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

γραφαῖς [20 verses](noun pl fem dat) "Scriptures" is graphê, which means "drawing", "writing", "the art of writing", "that which is written", "a list", "a prescription," and "official records."

Λίθον [15 verses](noun sg masc acc) "The stone" is lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones.

ὃν (pron sg masc acc) "This" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἀπεδοκίμασαν [5 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Rejected" is apodokimazô, which means specifically "reject on scrutiny", "reject as unfit or unworthy," and "reject for want of qualifications."

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

οἰκοδομοῦντες [18 verses](part pl pres act masc nom) "The builders" is oikodomeo,which means to "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify."

οὗτος [137 verses](adj sg masc nom) "The same" is houtos, which means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

ἐγενήθη [117 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Is become" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

εἰς (prep)  Untranslated is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

κεφαλὴν [12 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Head" is kephalê, which means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing.

γωνίας: [4 verses](noun sg fem gen) "Corner" is gônia, which means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people."

παρὰ (prep) Untranslated is para, which means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "like (metaphor)", "a parody of (metaphor)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)."

Κυρίου [92 verses](noun sg masc gen) "The Lord's" is kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

ἐγένετο [117 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind mid) "Doing" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

αὕτη, (adj sg fem nom) Untranslated is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

θαυμαστὴ (adj sg fem nom) "Marvelous" is from thaumastos, which means "wonderful", "marvelous", "admirable", "excellent," and "to be worshipped."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ὀφθαλμοῖς [26 verses](noun pl masc dat) "Eyes" is ophthalmos, which means "eye", "sight", "the dearest and best", "light", "cheer", "comfort," and "the bud [of a plant]."

ἡμῶν; (pron 1st pl masc/fem gen) "Our" is from hemon, which is the plural possessive (genitive) form of the first personal pronoun.

KJV Analysis: 

Did -- This helping verb is added in English translation to make this clause into a question, However, the Greek is not necessarily a question. It could be a statement.

ye  -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

never -- The word translated as "never" is the combination of the word for "never" and "at any time."

read  --  (CW) "Read" is a verb that means "know well", "recognize," and "know again." It is always translated as "read" in the Gospels, but that always comes from the fact that it is used in reference to the law or written law. However, Jesus is never talking about "reading". He is talking about "knowing well" and "recognizing", which may have been read or heard or memorized, all of which were common in a relationship to scripture. 

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

scriptures,  (CW) "Scriptures" is from a noun which means "drawing", "writing", "the art of writing", "that which is written", "a list", "a prescription," and "official records." Christ uses it to refer to the written books of the Jews that we call "Scripture."

The -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. It was added for clarity.

stone -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones. "Stone" is from the noun which means "a stone," but there is no article introducing it, so not "the stone."

which  -- The word translated as "which" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here it precedes a verb in the form of an adjective. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

builders -- (WF) "Builders" is a verb  in the form of a participle that specifically means "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." In English, we use "construct" to specifically describe house building.  The form in an adjective, "constructing." With the previous article, "the ones building."

rejected -- "Rejected" is a verb that means specifically "reject on scrutiny", "reject as unfit or unworthy," and "reject for want of qualifications."  Referring to a stone used to build a wall, we would say "reject as unfitting."

the  -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used.

same -- (WW) "Same" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer." It is used as a noun that acts as the subject of the sentence. This is not the word for "same."

is -- (CT) This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. The tense is not present, but an action that takes place at some time, past, present, or future. This is confusing because a verb in the same form later in the verse is present.

become -- The word translated as "become" means "to become," "to be born," "to happen," "come into,"  that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. It is in the passive form, but we usually use the word "become" like a passive verb. This Greek verb, however, works differently, as we will see later in the verse.

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated word means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure. With the previous verse, the sense is as we use the phrase "changes into."

the -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. It was added to make Jesus seem more special than he described himself.

head -- "Head" is from a noun that means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing. It means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed). "Head" is from a noun that means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing.

of  -- This word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

the -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. It was added for clarity.It was added to make Jesus seem more special than he described himself.

corner: "Corner" is a noun that means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people." In Greek, another meaning for "corner" is "a leader of a people." We don't use the word "corner" similarly, but the meaning is easier to understand if you think of the corners as supporting a structure, like a pillar does. We do say a "pillar of the community" to describe a leader. In Greek, they would say "the corner of a community" in the same sense.

This -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "this" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. The phrase "this becomes" appears in the previous verse, but not here. When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

was -- (CT) This helping verb "was" indicates that the verb is the past tense. The tense is not past, but an action that takes place at some time, past, present, or future. This is confusing because a verb in the same form earlier in the verse is present tense.

missing "issuing from"  -- (MW) The untranslated word has many meanings, many of which depend on the case of its object. With the genitive, used here,  the sense is motion, "from the side of," "from beside," and generally "from." Here, the sense is "issuing from." The object of this preposition is "Lord."

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "this" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. It is added to recognize that the Hebrew verse source means the name of God, which is Yĕhovah, not just "a lord'.

Lord's -- (WF) The word translated as "Lord" means having power. It means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." Most importantly, it is the word the the Greek Septuagint uses to refer to God's name, Yĕhovah, which is how it is used here, since this is a quote from the Greek OT. This is in the possessive form because of the preposition before it. It does NOT ownership of the "doing" which is not a noun. With the untranslated preposition above, the two words means "from the Lord." It most likely modifies the capstone phrase above. The genitive form does not indicate possession but is required by the untranslated preposition. The following word is an active verb and "Lord" is not its subject,

doing,  - (WW, WF) The verb translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.  This verb appears after the introductory phrase, "from a Lord. The form is third-person, singular so "it becomes" or "it comes into being." The verb is in the middle voice, a change from the passive above, where the subject acts on itself. This is emphasized with the pronoun that appears after it and is not translated. This has no relation to the verb usually translated as "to do" in the NT.

missing "it"  -- (MW) The untranslated pronoun is feminine, which matches "head." Since this information is already in the verb, this pronoun emphasizes that it "it becomes itself." This pronoun is important also because it shows the sex of the subject, something we don't get in the verb. The sex is female, so the pronoun refers to the "head" in the previous verse.

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also")

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It is the opposite of the "was...doing" above. When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

marvelous -- "Marvelous" is from a noun that which means "wonderful", "marvelous", "admirable", "excellent," and "to be worshipped."

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

our -- The "our" is the plural possessive first-person pronoun. 

eyes --The word translated as "eye," also means "sight", "the dearest and best", "light", "cheer", "comfort," and "the bud [of a plant]."

KJV Translation Issues: 

16
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "read" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "scriptures" implies a meaning not in the word.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" before "builders" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "builders" is not a noun but a participle, "constructing."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" before "same" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "same" should be "this."
  • CT - Confusing Tense -- The "is" is not necessarily the present tense.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "into" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" before "head" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" before "corner" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "from" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "doing" should be "become."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "this" before "was" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CT - Confusing Tense -- The "is" is not necessarily the past tense.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "Lord's" is not a possessive but the object of an untranslated preposition.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "it" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

Have -- This helping verb is added in English translation to make this clause into a question, However, the Greek is not necessarily a question. It could be a statement.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

never -- The word translated as "never" is the combination of the word for "never" and "at any time."

read  --  (CW) "Read" is a verb that means "know well", "recognize," and "know again." It is always translated as "read" in the Gospels, but that always comes from the fact that it is used in reference to the law or written law. However, Jesus is never talking about "reading". He is talking about "knowing well" and "recognizing", which may have been read or heard or memorized, all of which were common in a relationship to scripture. 

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

scriptures,  (CW) "Scriptures" is from a noun which means "drawing", "writing", "the art of writing", "that which is written", "a list", "a prescription," and "official records." Christ uses it to refer to the written books of the Jews that we call "Scripture."

The -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. It was added for clarity.

stone -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones. "Stone" is from the noun which means "a stone," but there is no article introducing it, so not "the stone."

missing "this one"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "this" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here it precedes a verb in the form of an adjective. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

builders -- (WF) "Builders" is a verb  in the form of a participle that specifically means "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." In English, we use "construct" to specifically describe house building.  The form in an adjective, "constructing." With the previous article, "the ones building."

rejected -- "Rejected" is a verb that means specifically "reject on scrutiny", "reject as unfit or unworthy," and "reject for want of qualifications."  Referring to a stone used to build a wall, we would say "reject as unfitting."

missing "this one"  -- (MW) The untranslated word means "this", "that", "the nearer." It is used as a noun that acts as the subject of the sentence.

has --  This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. The tense is not present, but an action that takes place at some time, past, present, or future.

become -- The word translated as "become" means "to become," "to be born," "to happen," "come into,"  that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. It is in the passive form, but we usually use the word "become" like a passive verb. This Greek verb, however, works differently, as we will see later in the verse. Here, "transforms" works best because this verb is followed by "into," like we say "transforms into."

missing "head"  -- (MW) The untranslated word means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing. It means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed). "Head" is from a noun that means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing.

the -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. It was added for clarity.It was added to make Jesus seem more special than he described himself.

cornerstone: (WW) "Cornerstone" is a noun that means "corner", "angle", "a quarter of a compass," and "a leader of people." It does not refer to a cornerstone. In Greek, another meaning for "corner" is "a leader of a people." We don't use the word "corner" similarly, but the meaning is easier to understand if you think of the corners as supporting a structure, like a pillar does. We do say a "pillar of the community" to describe a leader. In Greek, they would say "the corner of a community" in the same sense.

missing "issuing from"  -- (MW) The untranslated word has many meanings, many of which depend on the case of its object. With the genitive, used here,  the sense is motion, "from the side of," "from beside," and generally "from." Here, the sense is "issuing from." The object of this preposition is "Lord."

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "this" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. It is added to recognize that the Hebrew verse source means the name of God, which is Yĕhovah, not just "a lord'.

Lord -- (WF) The word translated as "Lord" means having power. It means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." Most importantly, it is the word the the Greek Septuagint uses to refer to God's name, Yĕhovah, which is how it is used here, since this is a quote from the Greek OT. This is in the possessive form because of the preposition before it. It does NOT ownership of the "doing" which is not a noun. With the untranslated preposition above, the two words means "from the Lord." It most likely modifies the capstone phrase above. The genitive form does not indicate possession but is required by the untranslated preposition. The following word is an active verb and "Lord" is not its subject.

has -- (WT) This helping verb "has" indicates that the verb is the past tense. The tense is not past, but an action that takes place at some time, past, present, or future. This is confusing because a verb in the same form earlier in the verse is present tense.

done ,  - (WW) The verb translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.  This verb appears after the introductory phrase, "from a Lord. The form is third-person, singular so "it becomes" or "it comes into being." The verb is in the middle voice, a change from the passive above, where the subject acts on itself. This is emphasized with the pronoun that appears after it and is not translated. This has no relation to the verb usually translated as "to do" in the NT. This is not the past perfect tense as done.

this  --  (WW) This is a pronoun. "it," but not a demonstrative one, "this." It  is feminine, which matches "head." Since this information is already in the verb, this pronoun emphasizes that it "it becomes itself." This pronoun is important also because it shows the sex of the subject, something we don't get in the verb. The sex is female, so the pronoun refers to the "head" in the previous verse.

and  -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also")

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It is the opposite of the "was...doing" above. When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

marvelous -- "Marvelous" is from a noun that which means "wonderful", "marvelous", "admirable", "excellent," and "to be worshipped." However, this is a noun, not an adjective.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among." With the accusative, it means "into," "on," and "for."

our -- The "our" is the plural possessive first-person pronoun. 

eyes --The word translated as "eye," also means "sight", "the dearest and best", "light", "cheer", "comfort," and "the bud [of a plant]."

NIV Translation Issues: 

13
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "read" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "scriptures" implies a meaning not in the word.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" before "builders" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "this one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "builders" is not a noun but a participle, "constructing."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "this one" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "head" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" before "corner" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "cornerstone" should be "corner."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "issuing from" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" indicates the past perfect tense, but the tense is something that happens at a specific point in time (past, present, or future).
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "done" should be "become."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "Lord" is not a subject but the object of an untranslated preposition.

Front Page Date: 

Jun 22 2021