Matthew 24:6 And you shall hear of wars and rumours

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

A long section about "the end of the world" or, more precisely, "the end of an era." The  Apostles asking a question, meaning literally, "Tell us, when will this happen and what does your presence signify about the end of the age."

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

You are destined, however, to hear battles and news of battles. Look out, you don't want to scare yourselves because this needs to happen. Still, really not yet is it the consummation.

My Takeaway: 

Wars don't dictate the end of an age.

KJV : 

Matthew 24:6 And ye shall hear of wars and rumours of wars: see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet.

NIV : 

Matthew 24:6 You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse begins with a "but" not "and" as in the KJV and most other translations. This conjunction is left out of the NIV. This is changed by translators because they didn't see a conflict with the previous verse, but Jesus could be answering an unrecorded question here.

This is Jesus's first mention of war in the Gospels.

The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal" and a lot of other terms indicating the completion of a task. This is not the negative sense of something coming to an end, as in the destruction of something. If you have studied philosophy or science, you may be familiar with the term teleology, which is from this word root. The sense of this word is the purpose of things, the goal or motivation for them not just their conclusion. This is a different word from the one that is translated as "the end" in the apostle's question about "the end of the age." More about its use in this article.

Wordplay: 

The word for "hear" and "rumors" are from the same root word. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

μελλήσετε [10 verses](verb 2nd pl fut ind act or verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye shall" is from mello, which means to "be destined or likely to," "might have, " "must surely have," "to be about to," "to be always going to do," "delay," and "to put off."

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "And" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἀκούειν [95 verses](verb pres inf act) "Hear" is from akouo, which means "hear of," "hear tell of," "what one actually hears," "know by hearsay," "listen to," "give ear to," "hear and understand," and "understand."

πολέμους [4 verses](noun pl masc acc) "Of wars" is from polemos, which means "war," "battle," or "fight."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv)  "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἀκοὰς [[3 verses](noun sg/pl fem gen) "Rumours" is akoe which means "hearing," "something heard," "the sense of hearing," and "ear." This is the noun form of the verb above.

πολέμων: [4 verses](noun pl masc gen) "Of wars" is from polemos, which means "war," "battle," or "fight."

ὁρᾶτε,, [20 verses] (2nd pl pres ind/subj/imper act) "See" is horao, which means "see," "look," "have sight," "see to," "look to," "take or give heed," "see an object," "behold," "perceive," "observe," of mental sight, "discern," "perceive," "see visions," and "interview."

μὴ [447 verses](partic) "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

θροεῖσθε: [2 verses](verb 2nd pl pres ind/imper mp) "That ye be...troubled" is throeo which means "to speak," "to say," "to speak out," "to utter aloud," "to scare (causal)," "to terrify (casual)," and "to be stirred or moved (passive)." The passive is used here.

Δεῖ [28 verses](verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "Must" is from, dei, which means "needful," and "there is need."

γὰρ [205 verses](partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for," "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

γενέσθαι,” [117 verses](verb aor inf) "Come to pass" is ginomai, which means "to become," "to come into being," "to happen," "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

ἀλλ᾽ [154 verses](conj) "But" is from alla, which means "otherwise," "but," "still," "at least," "except," "yet," nevertheless," "rather," "moreover," and "nay."

οὔπω [9 verses](adv) "Not yet" is oupo, which means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

ἐστὶν .[614 verses](verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." -- The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

τὸ [821 verses](article sg neut nom/acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -

τέλος. [11 verses](noun sg neut nom/acc) "End" is from telos, which means "come to pass," "performance," "consummation," "result," "product," "outcome," "end," "achievement," "attainment," "goal," "state of completion," "maturity," "services rendered," "something done," "task," "duty," "toll," and "custom."

KJV Analysis: 

And  - (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" joins phrases in an adversarial way and it is usually translated as "but." Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall  - (CW) The verb translated as "shall" is not a normal future tense. It is a special verb that means "be destined or likely to," "must surely have ," and "to put off."

hear  - (WF) "Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding. It is in the form of an infinite, "to hear" not an active verb.

of  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "of" in the Greek source.

wars  - The word translated as "wars" means "war," "battle," and "fight." This is its first use in the Gospels.

and  - -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

rumours  - Rumours" is from the same root as "hear" above and means "hearing," and "something heard." It is an uncommon word for Jesus.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

wars:  - - The word translated as "wars" means "war," "battle," and "fight." This is its first use in the Gospels.

see  - The Greek word translated as "see" means "see," "observe," "to look," "to look out for," and "to see visions." It is one of three common words translated as "see" in the Gospels. He uses this word solely in the sense of "look out for" and "take heed." The verb form could be a statement, a command, or a possibility.

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb could be passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. It could also be the middle voice, "scare yourself." It could also be a command.

not  - (CW) The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used. This negative makes the verb, which it precedes, look more like a command.

troubled: - The Greek word that is translated as "troubled" means "to speak," "to utter aloud," "to scare," and "to terrify." It is an uncommon word for Christ and not one of the common words translated as "speak" or "say" in the Gospels. Jesus uses it for its "scare" meaning. However, it is not that passive in which it is translated. It is a form with the subject acts on themselves, "scare yourselves."

for  - The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, to prevent a run-on sentence, translated as a "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

all these things  -- (OS) There is nothing in the Greek that can be translated as "all these things" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

must  - "Must" is from a special verb that means "there is need" as we would say "it is necessary."

come to pass,  - The word translated as "comes to pass" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state.  In describing events, it means "happen," which is the sense here. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

but  - The Greek word translated as "but" denote an exception or simple opposition. It is different than the word that begins this verse that is also usually translated as "but." "Still" or "however" work well when the word isn't being used as a conjunction, especially when it begins a sentence or phrase.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

end  - (CW)  The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal," and a lot of other terms indicating the completion of a task. This is not the negative sense of something coming to an end, as in the destruction of something.  More about its use in this article.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. 

not yet. - "Not yet" is an adverb that is a strong "not yet, which combines a softer form of "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

KJV Translation Issues: 

8
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" should be "but."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "shall" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "hear" is not an active verb but an infinitive, "to hear."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "of" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is the subjective negative of opinion with the sense of "not wanting," "not thinking" or not seeming when used with a non-opinion verb.
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "all these things" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "end" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.

NIV Analysis: 

You -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

missing "however"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "however" joins phrases in an adversarial way and it is usually translated as "but." Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

will - (CW) The verb translated as "shall" is not a normal future tense. It is a special verb that means "be destined or likely to," "must surely have ," and "to put off."

hear  - (WF) "Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding. It is in the form of an infinite, "to hear" not an active verb.

of  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "of" in the Greek source.

wars  - The word translated as "wars" means "war," "battle," and "fight." This is its first use in the Gospels.

and  - -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

rumours  - Rumours" is from the same root as "hear" above and means "hearing," and "something heard." It is an uncommon word for Jesus.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

wars:  - - The word translated as "wars" means "war," "battle," and "fight." This is its first use in the Gospels.

but -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "but" in the Greek source.

see  - The Greek word translated as "see" means "see," "observe," "to look," "to look out for," and "to see visions." It is one of three common words translated as "see" in the Gospels. He uses this word solely in the sense of "look out for" and "take heed." The verb form could be a statement, a command, or a possibility.

to it that -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "to it that" in the Greek source.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

are -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb could be passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. It could also be the middle voice, "scare yourself." It could also be a command.

not  - (CW) The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used. This negative makes the verb, which it precedes, look more like a command.

alarmed: - The Greek word that is translated as "alarmed" means "to speak," "to utter aloud," "to scare," and "to terrify." It is an uncommon word for Christ and not one of the common words translated as "speak" or "say" in the Gospels. Jesus uses it for its "scare" meaning. However, it is not that passive in which it is translated. It is a form with the subject acts on themselves, "scare yourselves."

missing "for"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, to prevent a run-on sentence, translated as a "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

Such things  -- -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "such things" in the Greek source.

must  - "Must" is from a special verb that means "there is need" as we would say "it is necessary."

happen - The word translated as "happen" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state.  In describing events, it means "happen," which is the sense here. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

but  - The Greek word translated as "but" denote an exception or simple opposition. It is different than the word that begins this verse that is also usually translated as "but." "Still" or "however" work well when the word isn't being used as a conjunction, especially when it begins a sentence or phrase.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

end  - (CW)  The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal," and a lot of other terms indicating the completion of a task. This is not the negative sense of something coming to an end, as in the destruction of something.  More about its use in this article.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. 

still. - (WW) "Still" is an adverb that is a strong "not yet, which combines a softer form of "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

 to come. -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "to" in the Greek source.

NIV Translation Issues: 

11
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "however" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "will" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "hear" is not an active verb but an infinitive, "to hear."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "of" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase -- The phrase "to it hat" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is the subjective negative of opinion with the sense of "not wanting," "not thinking" or not seeming when used with a non-opinion verb.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "for" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase -- The phrase "such things" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "end" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "still" should be "no yet."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "to come" doesn't exist in the source.

Front Page Date: 

Sep 3 2021