Matthew 24:14 And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

A long section about "the end of the world" or, more precisely, "the culmination of an era."

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And it will be proclaimed, this the good news of the realm, within the entire civilized region for a  proof to all these people and then it will be present--the culmination. 

My Takeaway: 

The culmination is the punchline.

KJV : 

Matthew 24:14 And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.

NIV : 

Matthew 24:14 And this gospel of the kingdom will be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word translated a "the end" doesn't mean "end." It means a goal or a purpose, a culmination. It ends the verses as its punchline, as is proper for a culmination, set up by the earlier verses' double entendre.  The word translated as "world" isn't the word usually translated as "world."   This uncommon word is only used by Jesus twice, meaning
"inhabited region" or "civilized part of the world." Nor is the verb translated as "come" the word commonly translated as "come" in the NT, having more the sense of being present.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

κηρυχθήσεται [11 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be preached" is kerysso, which means to "be a herald," "officiate as herald," "to be an auctioneer," "make proclamation as a herald," "summon by herald," "proclaim," "announce," "command publicly," and, of a cock, "crow." In the passive, it means "to be called," "to be proclaimed," and "to be extolled."

τοῦτο [93 verses](adj sg neut nom/acc) "This" is from touto, which means "from here," "from there," "this [thing]," or "that [thing]."

τὸ [821 verses](article sg neut nom/acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

εὐαγγέλιον (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Gospel" is euaggelion a "reward of good tidings," a "thank offering for good tidings, " "good news," and "good tidings." Originally, this term described a reward, like a tip, given to a messenger who brought good news.

τῆς [821 verses](article sg fem gen)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

βασιλείας (noun sg fem gen) "The kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom," "dominion," "hereditary monarchy," "kingly office," "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

ἐν [413 verses](prep) "In" is from en, which means "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," and "with."

ὅλῃ [23 verses](adj sg fem dat) "All" is from holos, which means "the whole," "entire," "complete," "complete in all its parts," "wholly," "altogether," "on the whole," "speaking generally," "utter," "actually," "really, "the universe," and "safe and sound."

τῇ [821 verses](article sg fem dat)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

οἰκουμένῃ [2 verses](noun sg fem dat) "The world" is oikoumene, which means "the inhabited region." It was often used to denote the civilized world as separate from the lands of barbarians.

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "For" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -

μαρτύριον[4 verses] (noun sg neut acc) "A witness" is martyrion, which means "testimony," and proof."

πᾶσιν [212 verses](adj pl masc dat) "All" is from pas, which means "all," "the whole," "every," "anyone," "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way," "on every side," "in every way," and "altogether."

τοῖς [821 verses](article pl neut dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἔθνεσιν, (noun pl neut dat) "Nations" is from ethnos, which means "a number of people living together," "company," "body of men," "tribe," "a people," "nation," and (later) "foreign, barbarous nations."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv)"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

τότε [53 verses](adv) "Then" is from tote, which means "at that time" and "then."

ἥξει [11 verses](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Shall come" is heko, which means "to arrive," "to have come," "to be present," "to have reached a point, "to pass though a point (geometry)," "to have come back," "returned," "to have come to table," "concern," "relate to," "to depend upon," and, as a metaphor, "to be a follower."

τὸ [821 verses](article sg neut nom/acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

τέλος. (noun sg neut nom/acc) "End" is from telos, which means "come to pass," "performance," "consummation," "result," "product," "outcome," "end," "achievement," "attainment," "goal," "state of completion," "maturity," "services rendered," "something done," "task," "duty," "toll," and "custom."

KJV Analysis: 

And  - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

this - The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

gospel  - "Gospel" is from a noun that originally meant "a reward for good tiding given to a messenger." It was customary to reward a messenger who brought good news in the same way that we might tip someone. It later was used to denote "good tidings" and "good news" itself.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

kingdom  - The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

preached  -  (CW) "Preached" is from a verb that means "to be a herald" and "to announce." In the passive, it means "to be proclaimed or announce." It is also the word used to describe the crowing of a cock at dawn. It does not indicate sermonizing on religious topics.

in  - The word translated as "in" also means "within," "with," or "among."

all  - (CW)  The first word translated as "all" means something that is "complete" or "the whole" of something, and can mean "the whole universe" as well as being "safe and sound" in being kept "whole."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

world  - (CW) The noun translated as "world" is not the Greek word usually translated as "the world." This uncommon word means "the inhabited region." It was often used to denote the civilized world as separate from the lands of barbarians.

for  - The word translated as "for" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "for" a purpose.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

witness  - The Greek noun translated as "witness" is from means "testimony" and "proof.

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

all  - The adjective translated as "all" is from the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. This is the word usually translated as "all." This is an indirect object, matching the "nations" below. This is the common word for "all" not the one used above.

nations;  - The noun translated as "nations" means "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. This is the word usually translated as "gentiles" in the NT.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

then -- The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then." With the subjective negative, the sense is "not when."

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

end - (CW) The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal." It is the term Jesus uses to describe the culmination or the purpose of an era or lifetime. It is more of an accomplishment than a simple stopping of something.  Its use in the phrase "end of the world" is discussed in this article.

come.  - (CW) The verb translated as "shall come" means "to arrive," "to have come," "to be present," and "to have reached a point." It is a metaphor for "to be a follower." This is not the common word translated as "come."

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "gospel" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "preached" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "all" is not the common word usually translated as "all."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "world" is not the common word usually translated as "world."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "end" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "come" is not the common word usually translated as "come."

NIV Analysis: 

And  - The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

this - The word translated as "this" means "from here" or "this/that thing."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

gospel  - "Gospel" is from a noun that originally meant "a reward for good tiding given to a messenger." It was customary to reward a messenger who brought good news in the same way that we might tip someone. It later was used to denote "good tidings" and "good news" itself.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

kingdom  - The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

will -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

preached  -  (CW) "Preached" is from a verb that means "to be a herald" and "to announce." In the passive, it means "to be proclaimed or announce." It is also the word used to describe the crowing of a cock at dawn. It does not indicate sermonizing on religious topics.

in  - The word translated as "in" also means "within," "with," or "among."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

whole -  The first word translated as "whole" means something that is "complete" or "the whole" of something, and can mean "the whole universe" as well as being "safe and sound" in being kept "whole."

world  - (CW) The noun translated as "world" is not the Greek word usually translated as "the world." This uncommon word means "the inhabited region." It was often used to denote the civilized world as separate from the lands of barbarians.

as - The word translated as "as " means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "for" a purpose.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

testimony - The Greek noun translated as "testimony " is from means "testimony" and "proof.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object.

all  - The adjective translated as "all" is from the Greek adjective meaning "all," "the whole," "every," and similar ideas. This is the word usually translated as "all." This is an indirect object, matching the "nations" below. This is the common word for "all" not the one used above.

nations;  - The noun translated as "nations" means "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. This is the word usually translated as "gentiles" in the NT.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

then -- The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then." With the subjective negative, the sense is "not when."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, without a noun, it has the sense of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

end - (CW) The word translated as "end" means "purpose," "outcome," "something done," or "goal." It is the term Jesus uses to describe the culmination or the purpose of an era or lifetime. It is more of an accomplishment than a simple stopping of something.  Its use in the phrase "end of the world" is discussed in this article.

will -- This helping verb "will " indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

come.  - (CW) The verb translated as "shall come" means "to arrive," "to have come," "to be present," and "to have reached a point." It is a metaphor for "to be a follower." This is not the common word translated as "come."

NIV Translation Issues: 

5
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "gospel" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "preached" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "world" is not the common word usually translated as "world."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "end" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "come" is not the common word usually translated as "come."

Front Page Date: 

Sep 11 2021