Matthew 25:22 He also that had received two talents came

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

A parable describing a man traveling abroad, turning over his stuff to personal servants.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And coming forward, this one, the one [having] the two weights [of gold] spoke: "Lord, two weights to me you delivered. Look! another two weights I profited!"

My Takeaway: 

Doubling your money is good no matter what you started with.

KJV : 

Matthew 25:22 He also that had received two talents came and said, Lord, you delivered unto me two talents: behold, I have gained two other talents beside them.

NIV : 

Matthew 25:22 “The man with two bags of gold also came. ‘Master,’ he said, ‘you entrusted me with two bags of gold; see, I have gained two more.’

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse echoes Matthew 25:20, while abbreviating and slightly charging it. This is a common technique Jesus uses in his stories. He used repetition, sometimes to make a point, but always to add entertainment value. What is boring to read is entertaining when it is performed because repetition creates patterns that can be interrupted in surprising ways.

"Talents" is an adapted rather than translated word Greek word meaning "weight." It was used to refer to a sum of money like we would say "five large" or "five big ones" referring to large denomination bills. As with bills, its meaning changed depending on the type of currency. Its meaning as "weight" is important to the punchline of the story. It was the name of the scales of Zeus on which was balanced the fortunes of men, an important aspect of this moral of this story.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

προσελθὼν [6 verses](part sg aor act masc nom) "Came" is proserchomai, which means "come," "go to," "approach," "draw nigh," in hostile sense, "attack," "come in," "surrender," "capitulate," "come forward to speak," "appear before a tribunal or official," "apply oneself to," of things, "to be added," "come in (of revenue)" and "have sexual intercourse."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "Also" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

[821 verses](article sg masc nom) "He" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

τὰ [821 verses](article pl neut acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

δύο. [36 verses](numeral) "Two" is from duo, which means the number "two," "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

τάλαντα [8 verses](noun pl neut acc) "Talents" is talanton, which means "a weight," "a pair of scales," "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortunes of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

εἶπεν [162 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Said" is from eipon, which means "to speak," "to say," "to recite," "to address," "to mention," "to name," "to proclaim," "to plead," "to promise," and "to offer." -- "Speak you" is from means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

Κύριε, [92 verses](noun sg masc voc) "Lord" is from kyrios (kurios), which means "having power," "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord," "master of the house," and "head of the family."

δύο. [36 verses](numeral) "Two" is from duo, which means the number "two," "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

τάλαντα [8 verses](noun pl neut acc) "Talents" is from talanton, which means "a weight," "a pair of scales," "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortunes of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

μοι [70 verses](pron 1st sg masc dat) "Unto me" is from moi, which means "I," "me," and "my." -- The "me" is in the dative, which has a number of uses in Greek.

παρέδωκας: [43 verses](verb 2nd sg aor ind act) "Though deliveredst" is paradidomi, which means "to give over to another," "to transmit," "to hand down," "to grant," "to teach," and "to bestow."

ἴδε [52 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Behold" is from idou, which means "to behold," "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

ἄλλα [34 verses](adj pl neut acc/nom) "Other" is from allos, which means "another," "one besides," "of another sort," "different," "other than what is true," "as well," "besides," (with numerals: "yet," "still," "further"), "of other sort," "other than what is," "untrue," "unreal," "other than right," "wrong," "bad," "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest," "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

δύο. [36 verses](numeral) "Two" is from duo, which means the number "two," "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

τάλαντα [8 verses](noun pl neut acc) "Talents" is from talanton, which means "a weight," "a pair of scales," "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortunes of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

ἐκέρδησα.[4 verses](verb 1st sg aor ind act) "I have gained" is kepdaino, which means to "gain," "derive profit," "make profit," and "gain advantage."

KJV Analysis: 

He  - The word translated as "he" is from the Greek article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

also  - The Greek word translated as "also" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In the Greek, it follows the verb translated as "came," which indicates it plays more of an "also" role here.

that had received -- (OS) There is nothing in the Greek that can be translated as "that had received " in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

two -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple." --

talents  - "Talents" is an untranslated word in Greek meaning "a weight" as in a weight balancing a scale. It was used to refer to a sum of money like we would say "five large" or "five big ones" referring to large denomination bills. As with bills, its meaning changed depending on the type of currency. However, there is no English word that quite captures it.

came  - (CW, WF) The word translated as "came" is a special form of the word commonly translated as "come." It has the sense of "coming forward," "coming closer," and "approach" but it is typically used for an inferior approaching a superior. It appears much earlier in the Greek in the form of an adjective, so "approaching."

and  - -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "and" in the Greek source. It was added because the previous verb was translated as active rather than a participle.

said, - The word translated as "said" means "to say" and "to speak." It is one of the two most common words translated "speak," "say" and "tell," but it has more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

Lord,  - The Greek word translated as "lord," means "having power," "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord," "master of the house," and "head of the family."

you -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

delivered  - "Delivered" is a compound word that literally means "to give over."

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object

me -- The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me," though the form has other uses in Greek.

two -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple." --

talents:- -  "Talents" is an untranslated word in Greek meaning "a weight" as in a weight balancing a scale. It was used to refer to a sum of money like we would say "five large" or "five big ones" referring to large denomination bills. As with bills, its meaning changed depending on the type of currency. However, there is no English word that quite captures it.

behold,  - "Behold" is from an adverb meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!" In a humorous vein, this about how Christ uses this like we use the phrase "ta-dah!" in a magic show, or "voilà!" in French.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

have -- (WT) This helping verb "had" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb here.

gained  - The word translated as "gained" is means to "make profit," and "gain an advantage."

two -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple." --

other --  The word translated as "other" means "another," "one besides," "of another sort," "different," "other than what is true," "as well," "besides," with numerals: "yet," "still," "further."

talents - "Talents" is an untranslated word in Greek meaning "a weight" as in a weight balancing a scale. It was used to refer to a sum of money like we would say "five large" or "five big ones" referring to large denomination bills. As with bills, its meaning changed depending on the type of currency.

beside them. -- (OS) There is nothing in the Greek that can be translated as "beside them" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

KJV Translation Issues: 

7
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "that had received" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "two" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "came" is not the common word usually translated as "came."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "came" is not an active verb but a participle, "approaching."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "and" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "have" indicates the past perfect tense, but the tense is something that happens at a specific point in time (past, present, or future).
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "besides them" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "beside them" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.

NIV Analysis: 

missing "and"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The - The word translated as "the" is from the Greek article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

man -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "the man" in the Greek source.

with -- There is no "with" here, but the form of the "two talents" implies "having."

missing "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those"). See this article for more. 

two -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

bags of gold. - The word translated as "bags of gold," is a word in Greek meaning "a weight" as in a weight balancing a scale. It was used to refer to a sum of money like we would say "five large" or "five big ones" referring to large denomination bills. As with bills, its meaning changed depending on the type of currency.

also - -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "also" in the Greek source

came  - (CW, WF) The word translated as "came" is a special form of the word commonly translated as "come." It has the sense of "coming forward," "coming closer," and "approach" but it is typically used for an inferior approaching a superior. It appears much earlier in the Greek in the form of an adjective, so "approaching."

‘Master,’ - The Greek word translated as "Master," means "having power," "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord," "master of the house," and "head of the family."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

said, - The word translated as "said" means "to say" and "to speak." It is one of the two most common words translated "speak," "say" and "tell," but it has more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

you -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

entrusted - (CW) "Entrusted " is a compound word that literally means "to give over." It has nothing to do with "trust."

me -- The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me," though the form has other uses in Greek.

with -- (IW) There is nothing here that can be translated as "with" in the Greek source. It was added because the verb was changed to different action.

two -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

bags of gold. - The word translated as "bags of gold," is a word in Greek meaning "a weight" as in a weight balancing a scale. It was used to refer to a sum of money like we would say "five large" or "five big ones" referring to large denomination bills. As with bills, its meaning changed depending on the type of currency.

See,  - "See" is from an adverb meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!" In a humorous vein, this about how Christ uses this like we use the phrase "ta-dah!" in a magic show, or "voilà!" in French.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

have -- (WT) This helping verb "had" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action completed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb here.

gained  - The word translated as "gained" is means to "make profit," and "gain an advantage."

two -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

more.  --  The word translated as "more" means "another," "one besides," "of another sort," "different," "other than what is true," "as well," "besides," with numerals: "yet," "still," "further."

missing "weight"  -- (MW) The untranslated word means "weight." It was used to refer to a sum of money like we would say "five large" or "five big ones" referring to large denomination bills. As with bills, its meaning changed depending on the type of currency.

NIV Translation Issues: 

8
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted word -- The word "man" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "two" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted word -- The word "also" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "came" is not an active verb but a participle, "approaching."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "entrusted" does not capture the specific meaning of the word.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "with" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "weight" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Nov 8 2021